Author Topic: Canadian Privacy Law Blog  (Read 3602 times)

kuri

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Canadian Privacy Law Blog
« on: July 03, 2008, 10:59:40 PM »
I'm finding this blog really good - don't know if anyone else is as interested in the goings on of Information and Privacy Commissioners, but I think we're all concerned about preserving democracy. These guys are quietly making preserving a lot of what we value, checking the excessives of the government. You can see it in the contrast between Canada and US, where privacy and freedom of information/access to information is much more of a voluntary practise than it is here.

link

skdadl

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Re: Canadian Privacy Law Blog
« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2008, 07:04:17 AM »
Looks great, kuri. Must look to see whether he's on PB. I see that he does privacy; does he do AI as well? It's true that we have a lot of catching up to do in Canada.

GDKitty

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Re: Canadian Privacy Law Blog
« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2008, 11:36:59 PM »
I have a feeling that's going to be a great resource, kuri. Great find!

Quote from: skdadl
does he do AI as well?
I'm dense: do you mean "AI," as in artificial intelligence?  :oops:

deBeauxOs

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Re: Canadian Privacy Law Blog
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2008, 01:18:10 AM »
Access to Information, I'd guess.

GDKitty

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Re: Canadian Privacy Law Blog
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2008, 01:56:24 AM »
Quote from: deBeauxOs
Access to Information, I'd guess.
Thanks!  That makes a *lot* more sense.

I think I have 'overloaded acronyms' syndrome ;)

skdadl

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Re: Canadian Privacy Law Blog
« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2008, 06:29:12 AM »
Quote from: GDKitty

I think I have 'overloaded acronyms' syndrome ;)

Sorry about that, and no kidding, eh? I'm picking up bad habits from American bloggers, whose posts are so often paved with government acronyms and abbreviations. I have actually referred in conversation recently to the DoJ OIG's report (pronounced dodge oyg), which led to some crossed eyes. Next time I'll toss in the DoD OIG and SSCI reports just for fun.

As I understand it, "freedom of information" is the USian notion and "access to information" is us. I'm told their FOIA system works efficiently and is free, whereas our AI system is clunky (and costs money?), although their system is also now run by such crooks that I'm sure they can sabotage FOIA any time they need to.

GDKitty

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Re: Canadian Privacy Law Blog
« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2008, 11:58:01 AM »
It looks like the USians have to pay fees, too, but they can have them waived if they're under a certain $amount (they use $14 in this set of instructions).  That said, each Agency has the discretion to assess large "copying fees" if they want to give you the runaround (e.g. Lee and Paulette Albright).

American FOIA site
vs.
Canadian Access to Info site.  

Back in May, the Tories removed one of the best databases for this service--the one that journalists used to do quick searches for obscure documents.

Here's the Guardian UK's guide to British and Scottish 'Freedom of Information' procedures.  Some of the UKs laws in this regard are surprisingly recent--less than 3 years old.

The Hegemo

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Re: Canadian Privacy Law Blog
« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2008, 09:13:37 AM »
I've not dealt too much with the federal FOIA. I do deal with state level public records requests pretty frequently at work.

There's a useful compendium of the freedom of information laws in the U.S. states at The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press.

Of course, beyond the individual state's laws, there's always a range of responsiveness between states, or between agencies within a state. Surprisingly, Texas is a pleasure to deal with. Florida, New Jersey, and Connecticut are the worst. Of the states I deal with most often, Ohio is a pain pretty much across the board, but West Virginia is great, and Kentucky's pretty easy to deal with, but slower than WV.

The states also vary a lot in what they charge for records requests. Just about all charge for copying (although it's increasingly common to get records e-mailed in PDF format with no charge) and some tack on charges for staff time.

kuri

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Re: Canadian Privacy Law Blog
« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2008, 09:49:32 AM »
Quote from: GDKitty
Some of the UKs laws in this regard are surprisingly recent--less than 3 years old.

The UK resisted ATI legislation for some time. I'm unclear on what they have on the privacy side, but they've used the Privy Council privilege exception in way much broader than ever contemplated in Canada. The idea being that the government is only accountable to people through Parliament. There some thinking around that here, but since opposition members of Parliament are making ATIP requests, I find the opposition between ATI and Parliamentary accountability odd.

Holly Stick

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Re: Canadian Privacy Law Blog
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2010, 05:25:21 PM »
To revive this thread about Access to Information and Privacy:
Gloria Galloway about Access requests taking years
Quote
...Justice Minister Rob Nicholson's office said in an e-mail this week that proposed reforms to the Access to Information Act that were tabled in Parliament in 2006 have yet to be considered by the Commons Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics. "This work [of the committee] is essential before the government can proceed further," the e-mail stated.

In fact, opposition members of the committee said they did not learn of the proposals until this fall...

hat tip HarperBizarro
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Holly Stick

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Re: Canadian Privacy Law Blog
« Reply #10 on: October 01, 2010, 03:18:01 PM »
Paradis aide interfered with Access requests:
 
http://www.canada.com/news/national/Opposition+call+Paradis+resignation+over+aide+gaffe/3609102/story.html
 
 
Quote
... In the meantime, there's a valuable lesson for all journalists. File requests. When you don't get what you want, file a formal complaint to the Information Commissioner. And then file another request to the same department or agency asking for records that were generated by your initial request. Such an approach demonstrates, persistence, patience and strategic thinking. It doesn't always work, but in this case, it did, and a window into the shady and troubling practice of manipulating and interfering with Canadians' legal right to information has been exposed. "It paints a picture of a government that has a minimalist attitude to releasing information," says Beeby. "(A government) that badgers and bullies civil servants. And insists on tight information control from the (Prime Minister's Office.)"...

http://www.cbc.ca/politics/insidepolitics/2010/10/behind-the-numbers-resignation-of-tory-ministerial-aid-seen-as-access-to-information-victory.html?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter
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Holly Stick

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Re: Canadian Privacy Law Blog
« Reply #11 on: October 02, 2010, 11:53:32 AM »
Maher about Togneri:
 
Quote
...In 2007, after Tories held a 12-hour filibuster to prevent a committee looking into the censorship of an Afghan human rights report, I wrote: "Take note, civil servants who work in federal access-to-information offices: Your political masters will back you to the hilt if you hide embarrassing information from the people of Canada."...

http://thechronicleherald.ca/Opinion/1204992.html
 
And background from twitter:
 
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1309013
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

Holly Stick

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Re: Canadian Privacy Law Blog
« Reply #12 on: October 02, 2010, 02:21:41 PM »
Impolitical says government interference with access requests in 15 departments is being investigated (it's not clear in the article if Togneri is connected to any of them).
 
http://impolitical.blogspot.com/2010/10/saturday-notes.html
 
From this article:
 
http://www.canada.com/news/national/Opposition+call+Paradis+resignation+over+aide+gaffe/3609102/story.html
« Last Edit: October 02, 2010, 02:22:09 PM by Holly Stick »
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Holly Stick

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Re: Canadian Privacy Law Blog
« Reply #13 on: October 04, 2010, 05:32:53 PM »
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

Alison

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Re: Canadian Privacy Law Blog
« Reply #14 on: October 04, 2010, 05:55:40 PM »
Further to Holly's link, Baird has already stated he will not cough up the emails to/from one of those Paradis staffers - Jillian Andrews - that were requested by the Ethics Committee in August.

 

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