Author Topic: Bill C-61 Send a Letter to your MP via Online Rights Canada  (Read 1650 times)

radiorahim

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You can send a letter to your MP expressing your opposition to Bill C-61 (the U.S. dictated amendments to the copyright act) using the form at Online Rights Canada at the link below:

http://www.onlinerights.ca/get_active/copyright_reform_action/

If you're interested in following this issue and the net neutrality issues, Michael Geist's blog is a great "clearing house" of info:

http://www.michaelgeist.ca/

There's a bit of a war on this summer with the Harpocons over who's going to control how the internet works.

There's one very interesting commentary on Michael Geist's blog from one of the posters who shows how easy it will be to become a "criminal" under Bill C-61.

He upgraded his CD-ROM drive on his computer from an "old fashioned" IDE one to a new-fangled "SATA" (Serial ATA) drive.

A video game he particularly liked would no longer work.   The disk was "digitally locked" and wouldn't work on the new SATA drive.    So he downloaded some software that broke the lock so he could play his legally purchased video game.

Right now in Canada that's a perfectly legal thing to do.

Under Bill C-61, that's very illegal!    The rights of the corporation that creates the "digital lock" are more important than your rights to use the things you buy with the equipment you own.   Not only that, but distributing anything that breaks a digital lock is illegal.
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skdadl

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Re: Bill C-61 Send a Letter to your MP via Online Rights Canada
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2008, 06:30:15 AM »
radiorahim, why do companies put that "digital lock" on in the first place? More particularly, what is the public rationale that they give for doing that?

I mean, I get the greed and control parts, but I can't grasp how it is that they ever make this sound respectable.

Mandos

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Re: Bill C-61 Send a Letter to your MP via Online Rights Canada
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2008, 11:03:41 AM »
The argument is that if they cannot control who runs it, then it will be copied everywhere and everyone will use it for free and they won't make money and they'll starve---or at least, it won't be profitable to make commercial software anymore.

Thing is, the commodity software model is highly problematic and can only survive if only a few people can make changes to the code.  In a world where volunteers can put together enormous, reliable systems in their spare time, and people can pick up where other people left off, this model actually stifles a lot of creativity and access.  Most software employment, in any case, is not in commodity software, but in custom-designed systems optimized for particular organizations and applications, or in developing the infrastructure to create these things.  Certainly that's been the case for me.

As for entertainment software like games, I have a feeling that the video game industry hasn't suffered terrible from the fact that it is and always has been the most pirated industry as far as I know.

skdadl

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Re: Bill C-61 Send a Letter to your MP via Online Rights Canada
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2008, 11:07:04 AM »
Well, can you explain to me why the software can't tell the difference between one user switching his stuff from one mode to another and pirating?

Mandos

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Re: Bill C-61 Send a Letter to your MP via Online Rights Canada
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2008, 11:11:45 AM »
Software as yet has no reliable awareness of the identity of the user himself/herself.  Consequently, some software uses identities encoded in the hardware to represent the license-holder.  So if you change hardware, that's the equivalent of using a different driver's license.  Since the software is using the old hardware as a proxy for "you", you've become someone different.  This prevents you from giving the software to your friend.  However, it also has the side-effect of preventing you from "giving" the software to yourself over new hardware.

Your wasted investment in new hardware becomes collateral damage from the point of view of the copyright holder, who has little incentive in the short run to accomodate your desire to buy new stuff, but lots of short-term incentive to prevent you from giving the software to a friend to run it on his/her own hardware.

Mandos

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Re: Bill C-61 Send a Letter to your MP via Online Rights Canada
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2008, 11:16:10 AM »
I should add that some companies offer techniques to unlock the software for new hardware if you contact them and reveal information about yourself to them.  Some companies (M$) REQUIRE you to reveal your information, or at least let them scan your computer over the internet, in order to use their software.

sparqui

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Re: Bill C-61 Send a Letter to your MP via Online Rights Canada
« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2008, 12:47:35 PM »
An excellent entry at World Report today:

An approach to the Conservative's Bill C-61
If my grandmother had wheels, she'd be a tractor. -- Gilles Duceppe

radiorahim

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Re: Bill C-61 Send a Letter to your MP via Online Rights Canada
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2008, 08:51:14 PM »
This youtube video entitled "DRM=CRAP" by ZDNet Executive Editor David Berlind is probably one of the best "primers" on so-called "Digital Rights Management" (what the Free Software Foundation more accurately describes as "Digital Restrictions Management")

[youtube:i9frg2ww]YKI_w_VBoTQ[/youtube:i9frg2ww]


Under Bill C-61, DRM will have legal protection just as it does under the U.S. Digital Millenium Copryright Act.
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