Author Topic: Women's Election issues (formerly 'anti-choice candidates')  (Read 3641 times)

fern hill

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Re: Women's issues (formerly 'anti-choice candidates')
« Reply #15 on: September 26, 2008, 12:26:30 PM »
Debra, that's not an election issue. We have Gardasil and/or HPV threads.

Women smartening the fuck up.

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Female support for Liberals firming, poll suggests

Updated Fri. Sep. 26 2008 10:55 AM ET

The Canadian Press

OTTAWA -- The latest polling numbers suggest Liberal support among women has been firming in recent days at the expense of Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

The most recent Canadian Press Harris-Decima poll had 43 per cent of respondents reporting a positive impression of Harper, down 10 points since the start of the campaign, with Liberal rival Stephane Dion largely unchanged at 32 per cent.

Liberal support among urban women was at 29 per cent, up from a low of 25 per cent last week, and at 25 per cent among rural women, up from last week's low of 17 per cent.

sparqui

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Re: Women's issues (formerly 'anti-choice candidates')
« Reply #16 on: September 26, 2008, 12:29:03 PM »
Quote from: fern hill
The Star:

Read some of the comments. The Star is scare-mongering. :roll:

I read about the article as posted by Take Off Eh! and sure enough the anti-abortion trolls showed up to comment:

Get the message out: Tories anti-abortion agenda

They are such freaking liars. They always start off with the bogus need for limits on when abortions are performed. When you challenge them, they reveal their true colours -- it's about the human rights of the unborn babeh from conception on.
If my grandmother had wheels, she'd be a tractor. -- Gilles Duceppe

fern hill

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Re: Women's Election issues (formerly 'anti-choice candidates')
« Reply #17 on: September 29, 2008, 03:31:39 PM »
David Akin: Abortion and the election.

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Though no leader likely to be prime minister -- neither Harper nor Dion -- would introduce any abortion law in the next Parliament, there are MPs on both sides of the House who have in the past and can be expected to again in the future introduce private members bills that address abortion. Liberal Paul Steckle had just such a bill introduced in the House in 2007. He wanted to to make it a criminal offence to have an abortion in the 21st week of pregnancy or later.

And if it did ever come to a vote, NDP and BQ MPs would be "whipped" to vote against any changes. That means NDP and BQ MPs would risk explusion from their caucuses if they voted to change abortion laws. (In late 2005, NDP MP Bev Desjarlais did just that, voting against same-sex marriage laws. She subsequently was stripped of her official critics role and then resigned from the caucus.)

If, on the other hand, you are hopeful of restricting abortion access then you to ask both your local Liberal and Conservative candidates who they would vote. There are a number of sitting MPs from both those parties who would, in fact, vote to restrict abortion access rights.

In fact, so far as we know, it is only MPs from the Liberals and the Conservatives who make up a parliamentary anti-abortion caucus. Many members of this caucus appear each year at a rally held on Parliament Hill to oppose abortion but, we are told, there are other MPs who prefer to keep their membership in this caucus a secret.

A spokesman for the Liberals says that, if there were a vote on a bill that would restrict a woman's right to choose,  Dion, like Layton and Duceppe, would whip his caucus to vote against it.

And Kory Teneycke, the Prime Minister's chief spokesman, said that Harper would whip his front bench -- i.e. his cabinet -- to prevent an abortion bill from becoming law though backbenchers would be free to vote their conscience.

Now what about the Green Party? Leader Elizabeth May was asked - by a nun, no less - about this issue during a byelection she ran in London, Ont. You can review her complete answer here, but she did refer to "a frivolous right to choose" and told her audience that she is against abortion and that she has talked women out of having them. That said, the official line of her party is to preserve abortion access rights as it now stands. May was in the air when I phone the Green Party war room. They expect to have her answer on this issue later today.

 

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