Author Topic: Democracy Doesn't Fit Into the Ballot Box  (Read 9140 times)

Toedancer

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13966
    • View Profile
Re: Democracy Doesn't Fit Into the Ballot Box
« Reply #45 on: June 27, 2009, 09:33:18 PM »
LMAO, apparently democracy and Canadian values don't even fit into a gov't official's mouth.

Quote
"Canada Day is all about celebrating freedom of expression and the values we cherish here," said one senior government official, who asked not to be named because of the delicate nature of all diplomatic discourse involving Iran at the moment.
OOoo boogeyman is coming to get you unnamed gov official.
Delicate and brainwashed.

woops - StarPhoenix
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Berlynn

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6363
    • View Profile
    • http://politicsnpoetry.wordpress.com
Re: Democracy Doesn't Fit Into the Ballot Box
« Reply #46 on: June 27, 2009, 11:22:39 PM »
I don't know much about govt officials but I do know a few federal civil servants and they are all keeping their mouths shut about everything these days.  There's a real chill there.  Brrrr!
Never retreat, never explain, never apologize--get the thing done and let them howl.  -- Nellie McClung

Toedancer

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13966
    • View Profile
Re: Democracy Doesn't Fit Into the Ballot Box
« Reply #47 on: June 27, 2009, 11:57:21 PM »
Indeed and Canada waits for the U.S. to tell them wht's on agenda to yay for.
And my gawd these articles make me wonder wtf is going on.
Tips to Star, Board of Internal Economy and
Marleau's threat got some documents, not all

We're not Canada anymore, are we? The SPP is complete and we weren't told.

eta - for fear of derailing the subject I'll add for discussion:

Quote
A survey conducted for the agency found 57 per cent of those who didn't vote in the last election blamed "everyday situations" -- such as being on holiday, family obligations or work schedules -- for their failure to cast ballots.

Thirty-six per cent cited negative attitudes toward politics or political parties, including 14 per cent who said they were too apathetic and 8 per cent who said they were too cynical to bother voting.

The survey also found 58 per cent of electors said they'd be likely to register online and 54 per cent said they'd be likely to use it to vote.

Among those who didn't vote in the last election, the survey found 55 per cent said they'd be likely to go online to vote if it were available.
Spec on E-voting

As usual all the write-ups continue to put forth the apathy angle, as in  who bother to exercise their democratic rights, Elections Canada suggests. But the articles (everywhere) emphasize Canadians are just too busy to vote, which I find ridiculous.

Hon. Stephen Greene on Electronic Voting (is he a shareholder? gawd I'm cyncial) - Senate Debate, June 22, 2009

Quote
Hon. Stephen Greene: Honourable senators, I begin by thanking His Honour for wisely cutting me off last week during my statement on electronic voting as I approached the bewitching time limit of three minutes. No doubt, you will recall that I was waxing on the waning of voter participation in Nova Scotia and, by extension, Canada.

The Nova Scotia election on June 9 had a record low turnout of 58 per cent, despite the fact that it was an historic election with the issues clear to all voters. There were real reasons for Nova Scotians to vote this time but they did not, in record numbers, with many ridings turning out less than 50 per cent of the vote.

Last fall, there were municipal elections in Nova Scotia. Some districts like mine were given the option of electronic voting for mayor, councillors and school board officials. I voted from my laptop at about 11 p.m. one night. For the positions I had no opinion on because I did not know the people running or what they stood for, I could choose not to select, thereby voting not to vote.

The whole experience took me about three minutes — three minutes for multiple candidates in multiple elections versus the seventy minutes it took me to vote for one person in my advance poll. Electronic voting was a wonderful experience.

I have become an advocate of electronic voting by Internet, telephone or your favourite hand-held device. For some people, voting is already too tedious and time consuming for them to bother. I believe that, over time, physically going to a poll will become increasingly tedious, especially in relation to the rest of the things we do in our busy lives. I fear that our democracy is diminishing because of lack of participation. Electronic voting, coupled with proper civics education, can save our democracy.

There is a Nova Scotia company called Intelivote Systems Inc. — a world leader in electronic voting. Intelivote has managed many electronic elections in the United Kingdom and other countries, as well as Nova Scotia's municipal elections last year. It has recently won a contract to manage the electronic portion of the Romanian presidential elections later this year.

Honourable senators, the technology is proven, available and Canadian. I urge all municipal and provincial governments to run experiments on electronic voting in their next elections. Eventually, there should be electronic voting in federal elections. Electronic voting is our future; let us embrace it.
http://www.parl.gc.ca/40/2/parlbus/cham ... 40&Ses=2#4

Umm, no, I think one reason this is suddenly on the agenda is because what percentage of turnout make the winner illegitimate?

eta #2  Intelivoate who Greene calls for the contract says it is capable of a Audit Trail.
http://www.intelivote.com/default.asp?mn=1.33
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Toedancer

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13966
    • View Profile
Re: Democracy Doesn't Fit Into the Ballot Box
« Reply #48 on: June 24, 2012, 02:49:54 PM »
From last Thursday. Brandon Laraby.


So I had a conversation with Parliamentary Budget Officer [/size]Kevin Page[/color][/size] today. [/size]Lil' ol' me.I picked up the phone, called 613-992-8026, spoke to his secretary, explained who I was and left my number.  About 15 minutes later, I get a phone call back and there he was.Huh.



http://aboyandhistvshow.blogspot.ca/
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Toedancer

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13966
    • View Profile
Re: Democracy Doesn't Fit Into the Ballot Box
« Reply #49 on: July 14, 2012, 08:14:52 PM »

Rick Salutin @ the Star is doing a series on Democracy. Part 1 - Thinking outside the box
http://www.thestar.com/news/insight/article/1226296--democracy-thinking-outside-the-box


Part 11 - Correcting Canada's Democratic Deficit  (PR)
http://www.thestar.com/news/insight/article/1226296--democracy-thinking-outside-the-box


Good articles, except one thing is missing and I'm hoping he gets there eventually. Regardless of Democracy & not consulting with the people who vote the basturds in, what about the larger agendas the people pretend don't exist but absolutely do in Foreign Affairs. I hope he gets to the fact this gov't (to me) is a special interest group and leaves out the rest of us as well as I don't personally exist to serve this gov't's agenda. And of course the digital democracy where people are taking matters in their own hands and to hell with the faux democracy that currently exists in govt's or how the UN (as non credible as it is) is setting our agendas for us and again everyone pretends this isn't happening. How G20 gestapo tactics rather undermined the 'democracy' and we learned the gob just doesn't have our best interests at heart. I could go on, but still it's interesting to see how a member of the 4th estate sees things, and will he recognize that there is a viable 5th estate now and by that I mean bloggers who are engaged and wanting to contribute to political change. 
« Last Edit: July 14, 2012, 08:17:40 PM by Toedancer »
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Toedancer

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13966
    • View Profile
Re: Democracy Doesn't Fit Into the Ballot Box
« Reply #50 on: August 10, 2012, 08:36:00 AM »

Which of the following Canadian federal policy topics is more important to you?


http://loudmouse.me/policytopics
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Toedancer

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13966
    • View Profile
Re: Democracy Doesn't Fit Into the Ballot Box
« Reply #51 on: September 18, 2012, 11:15:19 AM »
http://ontarionewswatch.com/onw-news.html    - lots of interviews and articles re: Democracy Week. I just loved the constitutional expert Peter Russell's interview. Was done in his garden, lovely to listen to an older, smart man use words like 'disgusting' to describe Harperites, much the same way Broadbent used the word 'liar' in his '08 interview re: the coalition.


Mr. Russell -A "propaganda campaign" by "disgusting" Harperites to "deliberately mislead" voters helped push Michaelle Jean to prorogue parliament in 2008, reveals her advisor Peter Russell.  :applause
« Last Edit: September 18, 2012, 11:16:00 AM by Toedancer »
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Toedancer

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13966
    • View Profile
Re: Democracy Doesn't Fit Into the Ballot Box
« Reply #52 on: September 21, 2012, 10:38:39 AM »
http://oncampus.macleans.ca/education/2012/09/21/dont-tell-me-non-voters-cant-complain/#.UFx4dFnpWvg.twitter


Prof. Pettigrew on why he'd rather not vote

I personally like Cliche #2 best

Cliché 2. If you think all parties are the same, you aren’t paying attention.
In fact, I have been paying attention. It’s paying attention that’s made me so pessimistic. I read the news every single day, and I never see anything going on in government that’s worthy of the leaders of a great democracy.
All of the arguments I see are over minutia of economic policy. How many jobs? Which taxes on which people? This is not leadership. It’s management.
Still worse, pay attention for a while and you will see that none of these policy choices seem to come out of a genuine vision of how a civilized country should function. It’s all a matter of polling, and branding, and demographics. It’s name calling, and scandal mongering and positioning, and pandering.
They may all clothe themselves in different sheeps’ clothing, but they’re all the same wolf underneath.
« Last Edit: September 21, 2012, 10:39:17 AM by Toedancer »
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

 

Return To TAT