Author Topic: Lunch at desk  (Read 4191 times)

Audrey

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Lunch at desk
« on: January 24, 2009, 07:49:25 PM »
What is your favourite lunch to bring to work ?
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Croghan27

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Re: Lunch at desk
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2009, 08:58:22 PM »
Quote from: Audrey
What is your favourite lunch to bring to work ?

Most of the places I work are 12 hour shift places and so we (usually) have a kitchen. At the moment I am lucky to work with Dave. Dave is a bar-b-quing fool - he will bar-b-que at any excuse, and often when there is not one. The shifts got together and bought a communal gas bar-b-que. All I have to do is give him some cash occasionally or the meat - and that is not demanded either.

When I bring in my own meals I will often take in some bacon and eggs for breakfast (I begin around 6:30AM). (Some others keep serials there for the breakfast - the diabetics at work need to eat regularly.)  Lunch will be something easy to make or heat up ... often I will cook up some hamburger with some mushrooms and spaghetti and put that into several containers to bring to work.

The other options are to get some bread, most of da gyus keep a supply of bread/butter and peanut butter/jam in case of forgotten lunches. The chip waggon out on Prince of Wales is always an option in summer.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

arborman

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Re: Lunch at desk
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2009, 09:13:54 PM »
One of my favourite parts of my current job is that we spend a good 2-3 hours each day on meal preparation.  Lunch is some kind of home made soup with buns.  Supper is something more complicated.  I'm learning tons of new recipes.
The pleasures of the table are for every man, of every land, and no matter what place in history or society; they can be a part of all his other pleasures, and they last the longest, to console him when he has outlived the rest.

skdadl

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Re: Lunch at desk
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2009, 07:33:10 AM »
I like sandwiches that I can add a long strip or two of very thinly sliced English cucumber to -- egg salad or fish salad sandwiches really come to life with that slice of cucumber (and of course lots of chopped little green onions in the salad).

The greatest sandwich to me is the pan bagna (literally, bathed bread), for which there are many variations. It's called a wet sandwich because it's mostly or entirely vegetables, but it doesn't dribble because once you have constructed it, you wrap it tightly in cling film and leave it in the fridge weighted down with something, for as long as overnight. Next day, the bread will have absorbed all the wetness, and will be easy to slice into fingers.

M F K Fisher (mentioned at the end of that recipe) was one of the wittiest food writers ever. Here is her famous recipe for a simple ham and cheese pan bagna. Instead of putting it in the fridge, she advised wrapping it tightly and then sitting on it for an hour. I've never done that, but it's a thought.

Somewhere I've got a much older Gourmet recipe for pan bagna. Instead of just oil and garlic for dousing the bread, it calls for making a paste of oil and garlic and some green things, but I forget how that is done. Will try to find it. All this, unfortunately, requires forward planning.

lagatta

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Re: Lunch at desk
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2009, 08:00:15 AM »
Normally all Gourmet recipes (as well as Bon Appétit recipes) should be archived at www.epicurious.com - but I suspect a lot of the older content is still not archived, alas. And not all the witty writing, durn.

Yes, I like those thin cubumber slices as well. Italian sandwiches often include sliced (grille) eggplant/aubergine, artichokes and other veg. Often no meat at all, over there.

But in the winter I usually have soup, either a strong chicken broth done in a semi-Vietnamese style with fresh, barely cooked greens, bean sprouts, carrot slivers etc, or a more substantial soup with a lot of cooked veg and legumes. A vehicle to make sure I eat enough greens every day without thinking, and a means of consuming legumes that I find more digestable than most.

In warmer weather, more likely a salad with chopped vegetables and some kind of protein.

I know that ideally we'd eat a heavier lunch and lighter supper. I eat out of a tapas dish to keep supper on the small side, but it is more my real "food". I don't like to eat a heavy lunch as it makes me drowsy in the afternoon, when attention is often flagging after several hours on the computer anyway (both working and fucking off on e-mail and internet). And I don't drink coffee after 10 am.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Antonia

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Re: Lunch at desk
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2009, 10:54:57 AM »
I eat mostly at home, since that's where I work.

I go through waves, when I will eat the same thing for days, if not weeks, until I get tired of it or crave something else.

Currently, I am back to salads. A big bowlful of organic greens (spinach or mache or mesclun etc.), some fruit in season (currently Marocs), some sort of protein (chicken currently), some grain (I cook kamut or bulger or whatever) or beans (canned lentils right now), maybe some grape tomatoes, maybe some nuts or pumpkin seeds, tossed with a homemade lowfat dressing (currently yoghurt mixed with balsamic, garlic and a bit of blue cheese.)

These can be packed, with the dressing in a separate container.
It is when we all play safe that we create a world of utmost insecurity. It is when we all play safe that fatality will lead us to our doom. It is in the "dark shade of courage" alone that the spell can be broken.
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skdadl

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Re: Lunch at desk
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2010, 11:36:21 AM »
I could eat a horse, as they say, although I wouldn't. Opted instead for a toasted Cambozola sammidge. Will probably have to take a nap soon -- #butterfatoverload.

Antonia

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Re: Lunch at desk
« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2010, 03:37:26 PM »
I've been going to the newsroom past couple of weeks. Been packing different things.

One day, a salad of tabbouleh, rapini, grape tomatoes, green onions, mint.

Another day, sliced roasted eggplant with cheese and tomato sauce on a whole wheat thintini, melted at home and eaten at room temp at work, with a side of that rapini. (I made A LOT.)

I'm being pretty creative I think. I am trying not to use the microwave at the office.
It is when we all play safe that we create a world of utmost insecurity. It is when we all play safe that fatality will lead us to our doom. It is in the "dark shade of courage" alone that the spell can be broken.
-- Dag Hammarskjöld

skdadl

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Re: Lunch at desk
« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2010, 04:05:31 PM »
Microwaves are the work of the devil. (Trans: skdadl never figured out what to do with a microwave beyond heating coffee, and even that turned into disaster when she tried heating up cup with gold detailing on it.)

Actual cooking doesn't take that long, unless you're doing a turkey or something. Rice is one cigarette's worth; lots of meats are two cigarettes' worth. Where is teh problem?
« Last Edit: November 20, 2010, 04:12:22 PM by skdadl »

Antonia

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Re: Lunch at desk
« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2010, 02:46:06 PM »
I cook my Red River in my microwave. I do it right in the bowl so there's no pot to scrub.

I also nuke veggies for omelets and soups there too. Cuts back on fat. For example, I put sliced onions and mushroom in a bowl, nuke em and then use them in an omelet.
It is when we all play safe that we create a world of utmost insecurity. It is when we all play safe that fatality will lead us to our doom. It is in the "dark shade of courage" alone that the spell can be broken.
-- Dag Hammarskjöld

deBeauxOs

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Lunch at desk
« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2010, 02:54:55 PM »
I cook my Red River in my microwave. I do it right in the bowl so there's no pot to scrub.
Agreed, microwaves are handy, though not necessary.
 
My house had one, built-in, when I moved in.  It's now over 20 years old and still works adequately for thawing broth for my cat's food, heating milk for my café au lait, and warming assorted left-over dishes.
 
I prefer to use glass bowls, never plastic and certainly nothing with metal on it.  ::)
« Last Edit: November 21, 2010, 03:06:57 PM by deBeauxOs »

sparqui

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Re: Lunch at desk
« Reply #11 on: November 21, 2010, 03:04:59 PM »
I have a microwave that is at least 20 years old. Use it to reheat coffee and left overs but try to limit its use.

I'm pretty lazy about cooking for one so if there are no leftovers to heat up and eat at my desk, I usually rely on easy to access nibbles. Hummus with sesame rice crackers and crudités is an easy favourite. Sliced avocado with simple olive oil and lemon juice vinaigrette is another standby favourite. 
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lagatta

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Re: Lunch at desk
« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2010, 03:16:49 PM »
I have a largish toaster oven which I love to use for cooking small portions of fish and other foods. No room or desire for a microwave. I really don't like them very much.

I wouldn't like microwaved veg in an omelette. I sautée that kind of thing in my well-seasoned wok, just brushing wok with a bit of oil w/ my silicone brush. Don't think it adds a significant amount of fat. Sautéed veg browns a bit and adds a lot of flavour.

I've been making a lot of soup recently; that is what I usually have for lunch at desk. Milano had two good-sized packages of chicken-wing tips for $1 each - I think that will make good stock. Smells good, anyway. Cooking all day in the crockpot, then I'll transfer the stock to heatproof glass jars and set them out on the balcony to cool, and remove the congealed fat that rises to the top (like bourgeois scum).

In days of old, Indigenous people here called European colonizers "fat-skimmers" - not like contemporary fat-conscious Westerners, rather the opposite. The Whiteys ate all the fat (needed in the cold with no central heating) without thinking of the whole group around the fire.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

jrootham

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Re: Lunch at desk
« Reply #13 on: November 21, 2010, 11:56:38 PM »
If you are concerned about energy use microwaves are better than ovens or stoves.


The gastronomic effects are different, it's up to you to make the call.


lagatta

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Re: Lunch at desk
« Reply #14 on: November 22, 2010, 12:12:57 AM »
I'm very concerned about energy use (and ecology in general). I've never owned or driven a car in my life, I live in a smallish flat near good public transport and usually take my bicycle, I don't consume a lot of crap, even when I can afford it. And try to eat local as much as feasable (Québec doesn't produce coffee, and Québec wine is shite).

But I'm not going to buy another appliance (which has other serious health concerns) and "cook" something that would produce a gloppy substance that would make me gag. That would waste the food, the production of the device, and the energy it takes to power said device.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

 

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