Author Topic: Signs that the world is going to hell in a handbasket  (Read 8068 times)

Antonia

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Re: Signs that the world is going to hell in a handbasket
« Reply #15 on: March 07, 2009, 12:46:02 PM »
Oh it was gradual, throughout the 80s and 90s.

That's when cable started becoming a force and people, especially in the US which lagged behind Canada in cable penetration, started subscribing, especially with the advent of so-called superstations and specialty services. (Blame Ted Turner for CNN and TBS.) The growth of MTV and HBO in the US, MuchMusic and Newsworld, and other such services started to fragment audiences.

In radio, the advent of walkmans, CDs and other advanced music tech stole audience from radio.

In the early 90s for example in Canada, the FM talk regs were eliminated so that news and any other serious FM talk was no longer required.

Corporate concentration also served to mess things up. Sure broadcasters were able to cut costs and obtain synergies by, say, producing programming centrally for stations across their networks, but that resulted in homogenous shit that drove more listeners away to their own music devices.

VCRs and DVD players were also a factor.

They used to say that a broadcast licence was a licence to print money, and it was.

In Canada especially, where the industry has long been coddled and protected.

I can remember a time, as late as the early 80s, when local stations not only did local newscats but also local current affairs programming. Now? Forget about it. And the broadcasters are petitioning regulators to do even less.
It is when we all play safe that we create a world of utmost insecurity. It is when we all play safe that fatality will lead us to our doom. It is in the "dark shade of courage" alone that the spell can be broken.
-- Dag Hammarskjöld

pogge

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Re: Signs that the world is going to hell in a handbasket
« Reply #16 on: March 07, 2009, 12:53:09 PM »
Quote from: Antonia
:lol:  :lol:
 Commercial broadcasting has ALWAYS been to deliver eyeballs (or ears) to advertisers.
There's more to media than commercial broadcasting. I'm not saying that they were always totally objective purveyors of information but I think that once upon a time, newspapers regarded their purpose as conveying information and commentary and the advertising as a means to an end. Somewhere along the line I think those two functions flipped and to a great extent the marketing mentality began to really run the show (with the possible exception of the National Post where they seemed quite content to lose money year after year in order to present a particular point of view -- as long as the rest of the conglomerate was successfully selling soap).

skdadl

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Re: Signs that the world is going to hell in a handbasket
« Reply #17 on: March 07, 2009, 01:31:22 PM »
Me, I think it always has been a mix of both and still is, although as pogge says, what bothers is the tipping of the scale.

I mean -- remember William Randolph Hearst? The guy helped to start a war with Spain/Cuba in 1898 because he was more politician than publisher, and then also because he knew he could get away with it, owning all those newspapers and all.

At the same time, I think there always have been and there still are a lot of reporters -- probably the majority of reporters -- who do what they do because they believe in the work and in finding out the truth. At both the Star and the Grope we still have people doing great work on all kinds of stories, often (especially in the case of the Grope) pretty obviously at loggerheads with their management.

Publishing of all kinds is so weird: it forces together two srsly opposed groups of people, the propagandizing or merely greedy bosses and the crusading kids who still believe that their mission is to afflict the comfortable and comfort the afflicted. Or maybe just to ferret out the truth.

My dad never wanted to be called a journalist, even though he became a semi-boss late in his career. He was proud to be a reporter, and always described himself that way.

Antonia

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Re: Signs that the world is going to hell in a handbasket
« Reply #18 on: March 07, 2009, 02:45:43 PM »
But I don't blame the journalists, most of whom are in it not for the money (laughable, really) or the recognition (if you count hate mail as glory.)

For the most part, media owners always have had an agenda, noble or (mostly) otherwise.

The Star was founded as a paper for the people, as a result of a strike/lockout at an other paper. We have certain principles to which we adhere, although I must admit that, at certain times, when corporately expedient, we have strayed a bit.
http://www.thestar.com/aboutus/history
http://www.thestar.com/aboutUs/atkinson
I think the appointment of John Honderich to the chairmanship bodes very very well.

But other papers -- look at the Los Angeles Times -- were all about furthering the owners' self-interests. http://www.experiencefestival.com/a/Los_Angeles_Times_-_History/id/1729070

Broadcasters always had to have balanced editorial policies.

Then Reagan et. all dumped the Fairness Doctrine, which gave us Rushbo and his ilk.
http://www.museum.tv/archives/etv/F/htmlF/fairnessdoct/fairnessdoct.htm

In Canada, editorial policy is still subject to regulation but what has happened is broadcasters took over the newspapers (CanWEst, Quebecor, CTV) and they have used the print editorial freedom to further their interests indirectly.
It is when we all play safe that we create a world of utmost insecurity. It is when we all play safe that fatality will lead us to our doom. It is in the "dark shade of courage" alone that the spell can be broken.
-- Dag Hammarskjöld

BCseawalker

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Re: Signs that the world is going to hell in a handbasket
« Reply #19 on: March 07, 2009, 04:15:06 PM »
If The Star would stop its hate-on for proportional representation, it would get my respect back. In the meantime, no amount of leftist rhetoric on poverty, equality, etc. resolves the dissonance.

Antonia

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Re: Signs that the world is going to hell in a handbasket
« Reply #20 on: March 07, 2009, 04:15:45 PM »
Like I said, we have strayed in recent years.
It is when we all play safe that we create a world of utmost insecurity. It is when we all play safe that fatality will lead us to our doom. It is in the "dark shade of courage" alone that the spell can be broken.
-- Dag Hammarskjöld

Toedancer

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Re: Signs that the world is going to hell in a handbasket
« Reply #21 on: March 12, 2009, 11:56:05 PM »
Crack Reporting from Corporate Media about terrists. I post almost entire article to demonstrate. So who did these things? People.

AMSTERDAM (AP) — Dutch police on Thursday arrested seven people suspected of preparing a terrorist attack in Amsterdam, including a relative of one of the attackers who died in the 2004 bombings in Madrid.

Mayor Job Cohen said police were acting on an anonymous tip that warned an Ikea outlet or other stores in the southeast of the city might be targeted.

"It wasn't a regular bomb warning, but a warning of a planned action aimed at creating casualties in shops," Cohen said.

"Men were planning to put explosives in the shops and wanted to cause casualties in busy places," he said.

Police received the tip Wednesday night from an unregistered cell phone in Belgium. The tip also included names of one suspect and locations for police to search.

Early Thursday, authorities shut down a major Amsterdam shopping street near the ArenA soccer stadium and sealed off the nearby Ikea store. A concert by the American band "The Killers" was canceled.  (:shock:)

District Attorney Herman Bolhaar said six men and one woman, aged 19-64, were arrested in Amsterdam. All are Dutch nationals of Moroccan ancestry.

"As far as we can tell, none involved has a history of terrorist involvement," he said at a news conference, though one suspect is related to "a person who exactly five years ago was involved in the attack in Madrid."

Police Commissioner Bernard Welten said the suspect's relative died shortly after the Madrid attacks "as a result of a suicide action."

Names of the suspects were not released. (Yeah, cause their bad to the bone, never having been involved in terrism before)


http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/art ... QD96SONL82
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

lagatta

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Re: Signs that the world is going to hell in a handbasket
« Reply #22 on: March 13, 2009, 08:31:40 AM »
In the meantime, they had some economics wonks on CBC joyously announcing that "even the Great Depression eventually came to an end, in large part due to the oversight of central banks"...  :roll:  :roll:  :roll:

Er, I thought a little WAR had something to do with that "recovery"?

And yes, Toe, truly sterling reporting. Good to know that humans, and not foxes or ravens, were allegedly involved in the alleged plot.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Toedancer

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Re: Signs that the world is going to hell in a handbasket
« Reply #23 on: March 13, 2009, 10:56:02 PM »
Sorry to be concentrating on the media, but my gawd they are so pathetic and have contributed so much to the world going to hell in a handbasket. Now lookee -

WaPo cuts out Business section Like we have to wonder why?  They even say so -
The Post has a strong line-up of business news reporters, and has written many large, investigative stories about companies involved in the ongoing financial crisis, including a three-part series on the downfall of insurer American International Group.

Berkshire Hathaway owns about a fifth of the company's Class B shares, and Chairman Warren Buffett sits on the board.


Because they were told to and they are going to gaol. And yet still no revolution.
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Alison

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Re: Signs that the world is going to hell in a handbasket
« Reply #24 on: March 14, 2009, 02:18:32 PM »
Well, Toe, they are pathetic, and desperate.
Here's a really dumbass headline : Obama Signs Law Banning Federal Embryo Research Two Days After Signing Executive Order to OK It
Dickey-Wicker amendment  *snerk*
The guys against stem cell research probably all have dickey wickers.

Croghan27

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"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Toedancer

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Re: Signs that the world is going to hell in a handbasket
« Reply #26 on: November 07, 2009, 10:48:28 PM »
Expenses purge will 'castrate' Parliament warns Labour veteran as MPs' wives launch High Court bid to keep their jobs

# MPs complain that £65,000 is not enough to live on
# Wives take legal advice on challenging ban on spouses working for MPs
# MPs claim new rules could force many to retire early at next election
# Alan Duncan cleared of overclaiming on mortgage repayments
Ifanyone has a kick dummy, pls. exercise it for me. And kick 1-2-3, and Kick! Let the 'castration' begin!
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Toedancer

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Re: Signs that the world is going to hell in a handbasket
« Reply #27 on: December 07, 2009, 11:45:38 PM »
Do you ever feel like you're in a Parallel World where nothing makes sense and the unbelievable is believed. Van transit Buskers may soon be asked to pay $1,500 annually for a performance licence.

Quote
the Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada -- is demanding royalties for songs performed in stations.
 :evil:  Well there goes that great program, asshats.
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

deBeauxOs

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Re: Signs that the world is going to hell in a handbasket
« Reply #28 on: December 08, 2009, 12:37:34 AM »
The royalties' demand by SOCAN is probably based on the observation that buskers are performing many songs written by their members.

People are more likely to give buskers money for songs and music they recognize.  But a 1500$ annual fee?  That's ridiculous, especially for artists who also play their own compositions.

skdadl

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Re: Signs that the world is going to hell in a handbasket
« Reply #29 on: December 08, 2009, 07:06:06 AM »
Well, the original says "as much as" $1,500, which implies that some buskers wouldn't have to pay that. In Toronto, anyway, a lot of the subway buskers I've seen are playing classical music, which is not in copyright, and there must be a fair amount of folk and pop music that is too old or too international to be fairly of SOCAN interest. It would be interesting to know the numbers, but it's outrageous to be charging most of the buskers more than a nominal licence fee.

Once as I was threading my way through the passages of a Paris Metro stop, I caught the sound of a deep voice coming from ... somewhere, so I followed it from one corridor to another until I finally got to an opening where a very large middle-aged man was sitting on the floor, leaning against a wall, head thrown back and singing The Volga Boatman song (I think). Incredibly powerful deep voice. A couple dozen Parisians (or who knows) were standing around him in a semi-circle, rapt and silent, which is really unusual for Parisians. At the end we all gave him an ovation -- the man standing next to me turned to me and said, "Formidable!" And of course we all gave the singer some money. That was in 1978, a scene I've never forgot. Life needs these moments.

 

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