Author Topic: Celebration suppers  (Read 10162 times)

pookie

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Re: Celebration suppers
« Reply #15 on: December 29, 2009, 09:27:56 PM »
I adore Marcella Hazan, imperious nature and all!

This probably won't float your boat, skdadl, but for hubby and me, I'm making a mess of sticky, glossy ribs, skillet cornbread and buttered green beans.  Still trying to decide on dessert, possibly something with mascarpone as I bought a mess of it and only needed a couple of tablespoons for Xmas morning cinnamon buns.

lagatta

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Re: Celebration suppers
« Reply #16 on: December 29, 2009, 09:56:47 PM »
skdadl, I don't suppose you can buy a decent tourtière where you are?

I'm feeling tired to make one, but I suppose I should snap out of feeling so tired. Life is hard in the winter.

shaolin, if you should happen by for a celebration summer in cool weather, I'll definitely make you a tourtière, as a vegetarian one is about the most celebratory (Western) wintertime vegan thing I know how to make.

I'm just wondering whether soft nuts might be a good addition. I was thinking of the proverbial British vegetarian nut roast (which can be horrible pseudo meat stodge or very, very good - the latter involves a lot of vegetables and not TOO much nuts, tasty though they are) and thinking they could be very nice in a pie,

Pookie, your menu sounds utterly delicious - especially the cornbread!
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
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pookie

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Re: Celebration suppers
« Reply #17 on: December 29, 2009, 10:22:04 PM »
Quote from: lagatta
Pookie, your menu sounds utterly delicious - especially the cornbread!

Heh - I made the cornbread for a dinner party in the fall and the recipe was a revelation.  The trick was to heat up veg oil in the skillet beforehand, then tip the mixture in and pop it in the oven.  Baked very quickly and stayed incredibly moist!

Speaking of nuts, I bought some chestnuts a week ago and have been planning to roast them in the oven (supermarket had a v. simple recipe).  Very curious to see how they turn out...

Nigella Lawson's spiced nuts recipe is incredible.  She says it would be a fantastic dinner all on its own.  Having made it, many times, I'm inclined to agree.

lagatta

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Re: Celebration suppers
« Reply #18 on: December 29, 2009, 11:02:10 PM »
I bought myself a tiny gift - one of these: http://www.kuhnrikon.com/products/tools ... hp3?id=210

The red one, of course. Not for paring, for travelling. It is like a miniature chef's knife with a safety sheath. That, a microplane type grater (actually a cheaper brand), a fine, flexible cutting board from a dollar store or something similar.

The nut recipe sounds wonderful - and not too much sugar (no more thant he salt) for my terribly soft teef.

I find nuts are much more digestable if heated a bit, in a pan or toaster oven.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

deBeauxOs

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Re: Celebration suppers
« Reply #19 on: December 30, 2009, 02:02:43 PM »
One could probably create, with a little bit of experimentation, a vegan better-than-meat filling for tourtière, using a combination of lentils, roasted chestnuts and other tasty nuts such as pecans.

skdadl

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Re: Celebration suppers
« Reply #20 on: December 30, 2009, 05:27:28 PM »
Quote from: pookie
I adore Marcella Hazan, imperious nature and all!

This probably won't float your boat, skdadl, but for hubby and me, I'm making a mess of sticky, glossy ribs, skillet cornbread and buttered green beans.  Still trying to decide on dessert, possibly something with mascarpone as I bought a mess of it and only needed a couple of tablespoons for Xmas morning cinnamon buns.

I've never done skillet cornbread before, pookie (always just made it in a loaf pan), but I've read about it, seen the tempting pictures -- there's something very seductive about that yellow cake rising out of a pure black cast-iron skillet -- so I'm trying that tomorrow, along with my beans and veggies. I may be too late to get a ham hock now, but in a pinch I'll go with some back bacon to finish off the Hoppin' John.

Mandos

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Re: Celebration suppers
« Reply #21 on: December 31, 2009, 03:01:31 AM »
There's a Southern Soul Food restaurant near my home in the USA that serves an amazing square of skillet cornbread along with every meal.  They seem to sweeten it slightly with some kind of light honey-butter sauce, just a dab.  Or so I'm guessing.  It's the best cornbread I've ever had.

Boom Boom

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Re: Celebration suppers
« Reply #22 on: December 31, 2009, 07:37:48 AM »
I used to cook with cornmeal often, but gave it up as it started to irritate my stomach, plus I was getting tired of it. Even today - twenty years later - I don't have a strong desire to have anything made of cornmeal again.

Croghan27

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Re: Celebration suppers
« Reply #23 on: December 31, 2009, 11:50:40 AM »
Quote from: Mandos
There's a Southern Soul Food restaurant near my home in the USA that serves an amazing square of skillet cornbread along with every meal.  They seem to sweeten it slightly with some kind of light honey-butter sauce, just a dab.  Or so I'm guessing.  It's the best cornbread I've ever had.

That is something I never see in Canada. One time while driving through New Orleans I stopped at a soul food place and they also served a side of cornbread with my ribs.

It was so good that I order some to take with me and nibble as I drove along.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

skdadl

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Re: Celebration suppers
« Reply #24 on: December 31, 2009, 12:15:05 PM »
I've never made perogies. Does anyone here have experience? A lot of people are making perogy jokes at the moment, for the obvious reason.

Boom Boom

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Re: Celebration suppers
« Reply #25 on: December 31, 2009, 12:53:22 PM »
When I'm in the south, instead of cornmeal, I opt for white biscuits with gravy, such as served up at the Cracker Barrel chain, but with better gravy. There's a restaurant just before you enter Savannah, Georgia, that does everything well - biscuits with gravy, but especially flapjacks.

lagatta

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Re: Celebration suppers
« Reply #26 on: December 09, 2010, 10:31:43 AM »
I thought I'd ressurect this thread rather than starting a new one, as it concerns year's end or Winter Solsticetime holidays and there are some good ideas here. We are almost too late for Chanukah, which ends today, though latkes (traditional potato ones or incorporating other veg as well) are good any time.

While I can and do make vegetarian tourtières and always eat a lot of veg (rapini seem especially nice this time of year), I do associate holiday suppers with a modicum of dead creature, in particular fish and seafoods.

IGA have announced La Fée des Grèves frozen smoked Atlantic salmon, 300g, for about 1/2 price. http://www.feedesgreves.qc.ca/ They are a very good smokehouse. I'll pick up a package to keep in the freezer to share with guests.

It is a good idea to make some wintry salads - celeriac, carrot, radish etc grated or finely sliced. There are many in Central and Eastern European cuisines, and they lighten the otherwise heavy fare considerably. Anna Thomas of the Vegetarian Epicure series is Polish, and has many good ones in her books
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

lagatta

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Re: Celebration suppers
« Reply #27 on: December 19, 2010, 12:00:40 PM »
I confess to a most carnivorous Solstice party on Friday...

A small lamb's liver, heart and kidneys: I busied myself cutting this offal stuff up into little bites, also chopping up garlic and flatleaf parsley, then sautéeing in olive oil. Also the smoked salmon mentioned in my previous posts. Various local cheeses, baguettes and savoury crackers rounded out the spread. Prosecco and Catalan Cava as the sparklers, then mostly Argentine wines, if I recall, to treat our Argentine friend C who hosted us.

No meat yesterday and doubt there will be today!

I want to make some kind of savoury tart - a full-sized tart, not tartlets - but have to figure out what to put in it. No meat (meat overload at that last spread) and I'm not making a short crust or puff pastry (I never make the latter, though I do know how). I like a rustic tart with a "yeasted olive-oil crust", sort of a rich pizza that forms up better for calzones and co. as it contains some egg.

There are many recipes for this type of crust - Deborah Madison has one in her "Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone" book and here is another from the New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/22/science/22recipehealth.html I don't really use a recipe any more. Martha Rose Shulman is using whole wheat flour, but I don't: just unbleached organic flour. In the pic she is also making a two-crust pie; I always make a tart for this type of dish; I only make meat pies with two crusts. Another friend is making us duck tourtière this year.

Local chef-personality Josée Di Stasio advises making a lot of stock for the holiday period and simply having "meal soups" on non party-meal days. Or simply a lot of vegetables... Mmm rapini.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Toedancer

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Re: Celebration suppers
« Reply #28 on: December 19, 2010, 12:29:50 PM »
Maybe the usuals, tomatoes/zucchini/eggplant/red pepper/garlic/s*p, perhaps some garbonzo beans. Say, would you spread cream cheese on the bottom of the pastry?

Cream cheese/parmesan and 1 egg, mixed until creamy. And served with home made sugar beets. That sounds nice for Xmas eve. I still have no idea what dead meat I'm serving for Xmas dinner, no idea. One wants a stuffed chicken, one wants a duck, no one wants a turkey.
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

lagatta

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Re: Celebration suppers
« Reply #29 on: December 19, 2010, 01:02:46 PM »
I wound up making the "green" vegetable mix as I had frozen spinach turds in my freezer compartment, along with finely-chopped mushrooms and onion, sautéed a bit and of course with garlic added. Also some tinned artichoke slices and some parsley.

I sprinkled a Swiss cheese on the pastry surface - they had a very good semi-hard one on sale at La Vieille Europe cheesemonger's, called "Mont-Vully" after the village where it is made. It is part-skim and although it is a cow's milk cheese, it is lactose-free. I don't eat cow's milk cream cheese - I might have a bit at a party but I have to take Lactaid with that and can well have to pay for it later on. I did buy a 300g log of plain goat's milk fresh cheese at Loblaws - seasonal sale, but still not dirt cheap. There is a bit in the vegetable and egg mix, as well as other odds and ends.

Yes, I like making the "Provençale" type you mention as well, but am not making more than one in advance. Even though I use a much higher portion of vegetable matter and less egg and dairy than a traditional quiche, it remains a rather rich dish.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

 

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