Author Topic: Goodnight, Aileen  (Read 12201 times)

schooner

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 91
    • View Profile
Goodnight, Aileen
« Reply #15 on: July 21, 2006, 06:28:09 PM »
Locusts usually do very well in TO, but they're bushy; the branches grow twisted and all over the place. The flowers all through June are heavenly!

Any of the viburnums would be all right; their bloom is lovely (if brief) and their fruit is edible - though hardly worth collecting, since it's mostly pit. Saskatoon berry and choke-cherry are hardy and the fruits are quite palatable, but the tree is on the short side and shrubby - many thin trunks - and tent caterpillars love them.

If you prefer a single trunk, mountain ash might be worth a shot. Hardy, tolerant; pretty berries in fall. Linden would probably do well and it produces a lovely, edible flower (like, right now) that's good in herb tea. I love poplars - partly because they're unkillable, but even more for their soft laughter in May, their scent on a hot July night and their colour changes in all seasons. Al;l of these are softwoods; won't live very long. You might consider and ordinary maple? (l love aspens best of all, but you probably don't want a pyramid-shaped tree in a small space, and they don't transplant well.)

So, now i'm thinking: Why don't we plant a flowering pink crabapple (my mother's favourite tree) and call it Elizabeth? The kids would like that idea. The only problem is, we may not be able to stay here. We'll know by fall. I'll keep that in mind.

skdadl

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32874
    • View Profile
    • http://www.pogge.ca
Goodnight, Aileen
« Reply #16 on: July 22, 2006, 10:59:28 AM »
I couldn't decide which tree thread to come back to, but this --

Quote
Saskatoon berry and choke-cherry are hardy and the fruits are quite palatable, but the tree is on the short side and shrubby - many thin trunks - and tent caterpillars love them.


-- is definitely a deal-breaker.   :shock:

No way am I inviting in any extra caterpillars.   :shock:  :shock:

anne, the trees that get lovingly transported from somewhere nearby so often turn out well, don't they. At our old place, we had a couple of cedars that ended up as tall as a three-storey house -- planted thirty years ago by Thorfinn's then-wee daughter, who had brought shoots down from a farm near Orangeville. Dear trees -- dear daughter to boot. I shall post a photo sometime, of the cedars, anyway.

Boom Boom

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9962
    • View Profile
Goodnight, Aileen
« Reply #17 on: July 22, 2006, 11:07:00 AM »
Two years ago we had caterpillars everywhere, last year grasshoppers. This year's biblical plague is blackflies. :(

skdadl

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32874
    • View Profile
    • http://www.pogge.ca
Goodnight, Aileen
« Reply #18 on: July 22, 2006, 11:24:59 AM »
Boom Boom, I hate to deliver the message this way, but the wedding is off, ok?  :wink:

Boom Boom

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9962
    • View Profile
Goodnight, Aileen
« Reply #19 on: July 22, 2006, 12:38:04 PM »
Aw, shucks. I was so hoping!  :(

'lance

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3468
    • View Profile
Goodnight, Aileen
« Reply #20 on: July 22, 2006, 02:40:19 PM »
I hate to sound pessimistic, Boom Boom, but I'm not sure it would have worked out anyway.

Would you have wanted to move to Toronto? Because I have a hard time imagining skdadl moving to the lower North Shore.

I happen to know (sorry, skdadl, but deny it if you can) she's still adjusting to the different climatic conditions north of Dupont Street -- as I would be, too. "Halfway up the hill," indeed.

Boom Boom

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9962
    • View Profile
Goodnight, Aileen
« Reply #21 on: July 22, 2006, 02:44:53 PM »
I love Toronto in the fall and maybe winter, but I couldn't handle the heat from May to October. The hottest we've had so far this year was 82F, no humidity. It was great. Blackflies are still a pain, though. But where else can you get a refurbished 26-year-old fully furnished waterfront home plus garage, woodshed, and garden for 28K? (even if they all need just a little work)

brebis noire

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4707
    • View Profile
Goodnight, Aileen
« Reply #22 on: July 22, 2006, 02:47:01 PM »
Quote
So, now i'm thinking: Why don't we plant a flowering pink crabapple (my mother's favourite tree) and call it Elizabeth? The kids would like that idea. The only problem is, we may not be able to stay here. We'll know by fall. I'll keep that in mind.


That is a lovely idea. You could plant one everywhere you go...

My mum's favourite is white-flower crabapple. She makes lovely red and very tart applesauce with it every year. The house where she used to live had one in the backyard, and since she moved, she's managed to find another source.

I also think mountain ash is lovely. Sorbier de montagne we call it over here, and it has beeyootiful clusters of hard orange berries in the fall.

fern hill

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10640
    • View Profile
    • http://scathinglywrongrightwingnutz.blogspot.com/
Goodnight, Aileen
« Reply #23 on: July 22, 2006, 02:47:49 PM »
Boom Boom, I gotta tell you, you keep this up about the coolth and I'll come up there and hit you (and lie on your basement floor) despite the blackflies.

Boom Boom

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9962
    • View Profile
Goodnight, Aileen
« Reply #24 on: July 22, 2006, 02:52:38 PM »
Quote from: fern hill
Boom Boom, I gotta tell you, you keep this up about the coolth and I'll come up there and hit you (and lie on your basement floor) despite the blackflies.


Bring some fresh basil and dried green tomatoes when you come, won't you? That's a dear.  :D

 

Return To TAT