Author Topic: Disastrous weather and other natural catastrophes  (Read 35566 times)

Holly Stick

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Disastrous weather and other natural catastrophes
« on: February 28, 2010, 01:29:23 PM »
This thread is for bad weather events and other natural catastrophes.  The bad weather may or may not be evidence of global warming, we  often cannot be sure.  

A violent storm in Europe:
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A violent late winter storm with fierce rain and hurricane-strength winds has battered France, Spain Portugal and Germany, leaving at least 45 people dead.

Many of the 40 victims in France drowned, while others died when hit by parts of buildings or trees and branches that were ripped off by the wind. At least a dozen people were missing Sunday and 59 others were injured.

The storm, named Xynthia, was the worst in France since 1999 when 90 people died...
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

Toedancer

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Re: Disastrous weather
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2010, 02:20:11 PM »
I will post my fave site: http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMa ... ticle.html
especially the webcams all over the world, link below.

A wee fact I found fascinating re: Chile's earthquake -

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Today's quake was so strong, that it triggered a seiche in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, over 4,500 miles (7,000 km) away. The lake sloshed back and forth, creating a wave 0.4 - 0.51 feet on either side of the lake.

Webcams from all over the world on Wundercam

This is Spain, but one can choose any country, then click on wee pic for whole screen.
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Holly Stick

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Re: Disastrous weather
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2010, 02:44:53 PM »
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

lagatta

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Re: Disastrous weather
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2010, 03:16:49 PM »
Hi all. I've survived Xynthia lite, from the Belgian coast to Amsterdam. Strong lateral winds on the highway - ironically I was being driven in a car (not mine, nor my choice, though the car was full) - big pile-ups caused by what seemed fender-bender accidents. I am not even going out of my room this evening. (Room is a "fellow room", like a little flat with a study/work area below and a single bed on a mezzanine, though the WC is shared among three of us). Awaiting more news as I'm more than a bit worried about friends in Chile...
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

brebis noire

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Re: Disastrous weather
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2010, 03:26:22 PM »
Technically, does an earthquake count as a weather event? It is more of a geological event, and doesn't have effects on weather per se - ?

Disastrous weather makes me think that the earth is too heavily populated. Really, that's my first thought, and I'm sorry for that. Can we conclude that there are more of these events, or that they just have greater consequences because we are so menny? I don't like to think about them as being more frequent because that seems sensationalist to me, and I don't like having apocalyptic vibes.

Glad to know you are OK lagatta, and I hope that your friends are all OK in Chile, another nation that is well-represented in Montreal...

Holly Stick

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Re: Disastrous weather
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2010, 03:39:48 PM »
Quote from: brebis noire
Technically, does an earthquake count as a weather event? It is more of a geological event, and doesn't have effects on weather per se - ?

Disastrous weather makes me think that the earth is too heavily populated. Really, that's my first thought, and I'm sorry for that. Can we conclude that there are more of these events, or that they just have greater consequences because we are so menny? I don't like to think about them as being more frequent because that seems sensationalist to me, and I don't like having apocalyptic vibes.

Glad to know you are OK lagatta, and I hope that your friends are all OK in Chile, another nation that is well-represented in Montreal...
I was debating that in my head before I started this thread, and have now decided to amend the title.

I think the increased population is a main reason for the greater consequences; but also we hear about the events more because of better communications and instruments for measuring things like earthquakes.  I read somewhere that there has been increased earthquake activity in the past 15 years, but it's probably natural, that is, it probably isn't apocalyptic or anything.
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

deBeauxOs

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Re: Disastrous weather and other natural catastrophes
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2010, 04:15:21 PM »
Volcanic eruptions can disrupt the weather because of the ash spewed and carried in the upper atmosphere.

Krakatau

Mount St. Helens

Toedancer

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Re: Disastrous weather
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2010, 07:01:57 PM »
Quote from: brebis noire
Technically, does an earthquake count as a weather event? It is more of a geological event, and doesn't have effects on weather per se - ?

The science is still out I believe.  The earthquake doesn't effect weather, but the weather can effect earthquakes. New Scientist

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For now, it is unclear just how much climate change will affect the frequency and intensity of quakes and eruptions, says McGuire, because Earth's sensitivity to climate is only now emerging. There is not yet enough data to build predictive climate models linking the two systems. But it's crucial that we consider just how easily our actions could provoke the planet, he argues. "It's serious science, not scaremongering."

Remember when our grandparents taught us we could know there were coming rains watching the swallows fly in different altitudes, or that the leaves of deciduous reversed and turned upside down? Or that horses would not step on familiar ground, but buck and avoid it, when they knew an earthquake was coming? I have seen all these things, so nature and weather is still a complete mystery we have not cracked, yet the Chinese managed to control it for their Olympics and even boasted/announced that.  Weather control is fucked-up, but it is happening and prolly for military use as well.
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Toedancer

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Re: Disastrous weather
« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2010, 07:10:06 PM »
Quote from: lagatta
Hi all. I've survived Xynthia lite, from the Belgian coast to Amsterdam. Strong lateral winds on the highway - ironically I was being driven in a car (not mine, nor my choice, though the car was full) - big pile-ups caused by what seemed fender-bender accidents. I am not even going out of my room this evening. (Room is a "fellow room", like a little flat with a study/work area below and a single bed on a mezzanine, though the WC is shared among three of us). Awaiting more news as I'm more than a bit worried about friends in Chile...

Oops, glad to hear your just fine Lagatta, will keep a candle for your friends in Chile.
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

skdadl

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Re: Disastrous weather and other natural catastrophes
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2010, 07:30:50 PM »
I've read in several places now that almost all the wildlife in the Asian countries hit by the 2004 tsunami moved inland or to higher ground some time before the waves hit. That could be myth -- does anyone have a good source?

Holly Stick

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Re: Disastrous weather and other natural catastrophes
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2010, 08:01:15 PM »
I don't know about that, but on one island the people remembered through oral history that if the earth shakes, run for high ground.  There had been a huge and deadly tsunami in 1907.

http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/world/archives/2005/03/02/2003225170

http://scitation.aip.org/getabs/servlet/GetabsServlet?prog=normal&id=EASPEF0000220000S300S661000001&idtype=cvips&gifs=yes&ref=no

Article about tsunamis in Canada:
http://atlas.nrcan.gc.ca/site/english/maps/environment/naturalhazards/tsunami/1
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

Toedancer

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Re: Disastrous weather and other natural catastrophes
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2010, 08:11:55 PM »
So they say - The elephants broke their tethers and started running UP, the herders yelled to the tourists, 'follow the elephants', as far as I know, but.... I know Thai scientists discovered 'fish' in the sea moved immediately to calmer waters. But I don't think the elephants are recognized by scientists.

Young elephants in Thailand/Tsunami

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A herd of elephants in the mountains seemed to know it was coming. They began behaving strangely, stamping the ground and tugging at their chains, eventually breaking away to run to the hills.

Elephants have special bones in their feet that enable them to sense seismic vibrations long before we can. Animals taking to the hills was not the only sign that something was about to happen.

Animal hero series including Amber in Phuket and the young elephant

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As Amber and her parents enjoyed a Christmas Day barbeque on the beach, there was little sign anything out of the ordinary was about to happen. But in the early hours of Boxing Day, the continental plates collided. Despite news of the earthquake hitting nine on the Richter scale, all was calm on Phuket beach. However, at the Elephant Riding Centre 50 miles away, handler Aniway Jongkit realised all was not well with the elephants. “They suddenly shook off their chains and ran up the mountain,” he recalls. Less than two hours after the earthquake, disaster struck on the beach. The sea suddenly disappeared –a sure sign a tsunami was approaching. Although no one reacted on the beach, Ning Nong was acting strangely. “Ning Nong kept pulling my arm and running to get away from the sea,” says Amber.

As the killer wave rushed towards the beach, Ning Nong raced away just in time, carrying Amber safely on his back. His quick reaction made the difference between life and death. But others were not so lucky –within minutes Phuket was swamped by the wave. Twenty minutes after the wave hit, Amber’s mother Sam rushed back to the beach to look for her daughter. “I was so frightened, but something told me she wasn’t dead,” she says. But how can Ning Nong’s courageous behaviour be explained?

Wildlife vet Roman Pizzi believes that the girl and the animal had formed a deep connection thanks to the hours they spent playing together. “It’s perfectly possible [Ning Nong] saw Amber as another young elephant,” he remarks. And because of the way elephants form long-lasting bonds, it could be a relationship that lasts a lifetime

I don't agree that Ning Nong saw Amber as a young elephant, in fact I think it is preposterous, ha! Just like I don't think the Orca that killed his handler, thought it was playtime with her ponytail in the water. Animals do deliberate things.

ETA - There was also no objective examination of the lack of animal corpses, which sucks of course. But the Chinese seem more interested than Merkins.

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What is holding this research back is not money but dogmatism and narrow-mindedness
National Geographic '03

I guess I out myself as a nature lover/believer, altho I think scientific instruments have great future abilities.  :D
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

transplant

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Re: Disastrous weather and other natural catastrophes
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2010, 08:45:16 AM »
From The ghosts of Rita and Katrina thread at EM:

Quote from: Hephaestion
Former New Orleans police supervisor pleads guilty to aiding in "a cover-up of stunning breadth" in police shootings

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Admitting a cover-up of shocking breadth, a former New Orleans police supervisor pleaded guilty to a federal obstruction charge on Wednesday, confessing that he participated in a conspiracy to justify the shooting of six unarmed people after Hurricane Katrina that was hatched not long after police stopped firing their weapons.

The guilty plea of Lt. Michael Lohman, who retired from the department earlier this month, contains explosive details of the alleged cover-up and ramps up the legal pressure on police officers involved in the shooting and subsequent investigation. It's unclear when Lohman's cooperation with federal authorities began, but he presumably is prepared to testify against the officers he says helped him lie about the circumstances of a shooting he immediately deemed a "bad shoot."

Lohman, who pleaded guilty in federal court to conspiracy to obstruct justice, admits he failed to order the collection of evidence or canvassing of witnesses, helped craft police reports riddled with false information, participated in a plan to plant a gun under the bridge and lied to investigators who questioned police actions.
Hope has met reality

brebis noire

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Re: Disastrous weather and other natural catastrophes
« Reply #13 on: March 02, 2010, 09:22:48 AM »
Earthquake shortened day and shifted Earth's axis. Ok, we're talking microseconds and centimeters, but still.

Toedancer

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Re: Disastrous weather and other natural catastrophes
« Reply #14 on: March 21, 2010, 06:47:22 PM »
Icelandic Volcano Eyjafjallajokull has erupted twice since Saturday  I'm placing this here because there is potential it could set off Katla.

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"Eyjafjallajokull has blown three times in the past thousand years," Dr McGarvie told The Times, "in 920AD, in 1612 and between 1821 and 1823. Each time it set off Katla." The likelihood of Katla blowing could become clear "in a few weeks or a few months", he said.
 snip

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A quarter of the island's population died in the resulting famine and it transformed the world, creating Britain's notorious "sand summer", casting a toxic cloud over Prague, playing havoc with harvests in France — sometimes seen as a contributory factor in the French Revolution — and changing the climate so dramatically that New Jersey recorded its largest snowfall and Egypt one of its most enduring droughts.

Quotes from TimesOnline
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

 

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