Author Topic: Which Canadian Stars ring a bell for you?  (Read 4231 times)

lagatta

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Which Canadian Stars ring a bell for you?
« Reply #15 on: May 14, 2010, 10:29:24 AM »
Job done. Thanks all!
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
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Croghan27

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Which Canadian Stars ring a bell for you?
« Reply #16 on: May 15, 2010, 04:45:20 PM »
Quote from: Boom Boom;182374
I could never stand Pierre Berton, but I loved Peter Gzowski and Farley Mowat.

In one of the golden opportunities in this life I got to quaff an few with W.O. Mitchel ..... (wadda marvellous man) - he and Farley, Farley had a dispute going back several decades - I always took Bill's part in this.
 
I mostly recall Berton on Front Page Challenge ... he served a good foil for the totally irksome Gordon Sinclair.
 
A small vignette about Farley-Farley. My brother went to a lot of trouble to interview him once for the CBC. He was no end of pleased with the turnout - felt it revealed a lot of the man and his books.
 
A technician at the home of the mothercorp, accidental erased the tape .. (Perhaps he found future work with the CIA?). Brother was destroyed at the loss of what he took as his signature interview and embarrassed when he had to go to Mowat to request a replay.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

skdadl

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Which Canadian Stars ring a bell for you?
« Reply #17 on: May 15, 2010, 05:22:16 PM »
Berton was an interesting guy. It's hard for a woman who knows much about some of his, ah, private activities not to feel a little uncomfortable about admiring him -- he was a guy of his generation who felt entitled where women were concerned, and that in spite of the fact that he had a good marriage (by all reports) to a strong and interesting woman, and brought up a passel of interesting kids. He was politically admirable, though, no question -- he was at least a social democrat and never hesitated to speak publicly to principle even though he knew he was probably to the left of conventional opinion -- that just didn't bother him. Unusual in figures who gain his kind of public profile and status, especially now.

I worked a couple of times, very briefly, with Mowat, and I found him amazingly responsive and generous. I'm sure he was glad to help your brother out by redoing the interview, Croggy. He understood the business; he understood that what matters is getting the stuff out there, and he was so willing to do whatever that took. I think he also got a kick out of encouraging youngsters. I never actually met him -- all our contact was by letter -- but he was an editor's dream, y'know? So practical, no temperament, a real pro. I only found out years later that he and my dad had been in an army training camp together just before they went overseas in, I think, 1940. I have a picture of the two of them in a group shot, which I sent to Mowat, got a sweet letter back, although I couldn't really tell how well Farley remembered Dad.

I worked with Peter too, and knew him quite well at one point. One of his partners is a close friend, so. Sometimes I imagine him looking down on me and wagging a finger at me for still smoking. He finally managed to quit -- too late, unfortunately -- but for a long time, he smoked more than anyone I've ever known (except maybe me). The first time I met him, we were walking up one flight of stairs in the old CBC building on Jarvis, and I was really afraid he wasn't going to make it -- that was in 1973. By the late 80s, he had turned things around and was happily settled down with a rest-of-lifetime partner, and of course he'd made a successful return to radio after the unhappiness of the TV experiment.
He was a very smart guy who disguised some of that under the sentimentality that worked so well on radio -- I think that was a conflict for him when he was younger, but he ended up going with what worked, and that worked out well for him.

Holly Stick

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Which Canadian Stars ring a bell for you?
« Reply #18 on: May 15, 2010, 05:52:55 PM »
So yesterday I was checking out the DVDs at the local library and found the first season of Slings and Arrows. It's good so far.
 
I don't know if it was ever available in Alberta, maybe on cable somewhere. Lord knows CBC could use more of the good old TV shows instead of repeating the same comedy shows and movies over and over and over all summer.
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

Boom Boom

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« Reply #19 on: May 15, 2010, 06:29:08 PM »
Like a lot of my generation, I grew up on the CBC, and, later, CTV. By the time Global reached us, I was watching a lot of US stuff - especially the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. I never liked Global TV much, and I stopped watching CTV long ago.

Holly Stick

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« Reply #20 on: May 15, 2010, 07:31:33 PM »
Since I am still too cheap to get cable my TV reception is limited.  Global's reception is too crappy to watch, so I don't see Bones or House anymore, but they'll show up in the library eventually. Channel 5 which belongs to CTV and Channel 13 Access are so-so and occasionally have something interesting.  CTV is not a bad picture and does have a few good new shows like The Bridge and Flashpoint.  CBC has by far the best picture on my TV and some good shows in winter; but right now it's either hockey or much-repeated stuff.
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

skdadl

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« Reply #21 on: May 15, 2010, 08:05:33 PM »
I seem to be able to catch up with a lot of stuff on YouTube sooner or later. Just from surfing teh blogs, I've ended up familiar with series that passed me by back in the days when I did have a teevee. I could get a set; I thought I was going to when I moved, but now ... I wonder. Why would I? Maybe if Armageddon actually arrived I'd need to watch in real time ...

Holly Stick

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« Reply #22 on: May 15, 2010, 08:11:27 PM »
Yeah, I've watched one Dr. Who special on youtube, though it was in about six pieces. I'm not getting any Dr. Who this year since I don't have Space channel. :(
 
My sister says she doesn't watch TV at all, just DVDs.
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

Boom Boom

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« Reply #23 on: May 15, 2010, 09:50:04 PM »
Here on the coast everyone has a satellite dish because there's no other means of TV reception, and most, like me, have probably 100 English and 30 or so French channels to choose from. I have seven 24-hour movie channels to choose from! Right now I just finished watching a terrific Vicar Of Dibley episode on PBS. :couch2:

Croghan27

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« Reply #24 on: May 15, 2010, 10:35:48 PM »
There is no way anyone could be in Fort McMurray as long as I was without working with and getting to know a lot of the fine people from Newfoundland. (The clan croghan27 has strong familial connections with there as well.)
 
Being in the oil business there were many that had worked for the Sheheen Oil Refinery project at Come-By-Chance. It was in that area that Farley-Farley set his book, A Whale for the Killing.
 
To put it gently, he did not put the locals, that had taken him sincerely into their society, in a good light. I have not read the book - but they tell me that it portrays them as blood crazed animal killers - even as they exerted much energy to rescue the beached animal and return it to the sea.
 
After reading the book it became obvious that the next book should be "A Mowat for the Killing" - they felt very hurt and betrayed. He, being no dummy, then moved to British Columbia - as far away as he could and remain in Canada.
 
As for Peter - that I shall forever call it "This Country in the Morning" says a lot about my view ... I had just graduated and moved to Halifax, beginning a newbie life and listened to every morning. (Except when I scored a stint at supply teaching.)
 
Twice he reduced me to tears .... the first when he gave a eulogy for Phil Ochs. ("Soon your sailing will be over; Come and take the pleasures of the harbour ..") (here by Glen Yarborough) Like all good eulogies it was about the deceased, Ochs ... but more than that about the mortality in everyone and the connect with permanence and principles, visions and life styles.
 
Ochs had gone on a tour that included Nigeria - and one night, filled with his faith of the goodness of all, had gone out walking one night and gotten rolled, his throat cut. He survived, but his larynx was damaged and he sounded like a frog with laryngitis. But his life was singing and performing - and he tried a come back. It failed. Unable to taste the pleasures of the harbour, he took his life.
 
Yes, it was sad that Ochs was dead, but Peter made that into an inspiration to remain true to visions and ideas and principles and all that good stuff. For all his failings, and he indeed had many, he remained true to his visions. Like in the song to Vincent, "the world could never take someone as beautiful as you .."
 
I will never forget Peter for that. Damn that man, did he not do it again on the last program of his first stint on the mornig show. Don Harron and (the wonderful) Alan McFee and and Laurier LaPierre and Judy LaMarsh did yoman's work at it - no one could replace Peter.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2010, 10:44:17 PM by Croghan27 »
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Boom Boom

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« Reply #25 on: May 15, 2010, 10:57:31 PM »
double post - sorry
« Last Edit: May 15, 2010, 11:03:20 PM by Boom Boom »

Boom Boom

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« Reply #26 on: May 15, 2010, 11:01:31 PM »
Before Peter Gzowski, two of my favourite media personalities in this country were Max Ferguson and Richard J. Needham. I won a contest Needham had sponsored every year, and he printed the article I wrote in the Mope and Wail, which is where he was employed, and invited me down to the King Eddy for a meal with him, and I gladly boarded the train from Ottawa to Toronto for the pleasure of his company. He was a cranky old curmudgeon but nowhere as evil as he depicted himself in his daily columns. He had such a cast of incredible characters! We kept up correspondence until I finished my college diploma in journalism - he was a mentor - and we gradually ended our communications. I still have the books I won in his contest - I wrote about Orwell's 1984 and the relevance I felt it had in Canada at the time.
 
Max Ferguson - gosh, I loved him. And insane Allen McFee, and Shelagh Rogers. I absolutely loved the CBC back then.
 
ETA: Oh, and Don Harron.

Croghan27

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« Reply #27 on: May 16, 2010, 08:21:24 AM »
Quote
Max Ferguson - gosh, I loved him. And insane Allen McFee, and Shelagh Rogers. I absolutely loved the CBC back then.

Oh so true there, Boom Boom - the character of Rawhide was one of the cardinal inventions of the half century. :) The mind of McFee was something to be constantly amazed at and appreciated. His later Eclectic Circus (who else could come up with that name?) was one of the few CBC music shows worth listening to just to hear his comments.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Boom Boom

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« Reply #28 on: May 16, 2010, 08:40:44 AM »
I have a couple of books by Max Ferguson, and my oldest brother had one of his recordings of Rawhide on the old Folkways label. I still think of Max Ferguson as the dean of Canadian comedy - him and Wayne and Shuster, whom I watched on CBC very often, on the Ed Sullivan Show, and on their own insane specials. There's a channel on my satellite list that occasionally runs Ed Sullivan originals, and W&S are often the highlights.

Croghan27

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« Reply #29 on: May 16, 2010, 08:53:48 AM »
Max and his crew of created characters was the first comic I heard that deal with the actualities of life, as I knew it. Always I shall remember the fast mandolin playing of his theme. (Who's name escapes me, damnit!) In looking for the name of the piece I ran into old recordings of Max on the CBC site.This particular one was at the time when, in school, we practised hiding under desks in anticipation of nuclear attacks.
 
As for Wayne and Shuster - forever burnt into my mind is the terrible and beautiful line: "We hope that you'll be a booster; For Wayne and Shuster ..." :pound:
« Last Edit: May 16, 2010, 08:54:34 AM by Croghan27 »
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

 

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