Author Topic: Preparing for the Post-Carbon Age by Doris Haddock  (Read 2000 times)

Toedancer

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13966
    • View Profile
Preparing for the Post-Carbon Age by Doris Haddock
« on: May 30, 2006, 09:31:22 PM »
Wow she sure can write a kick-ass article. I especially love her demand that the internet will always be free so people can communicate.

Here is a snippet.

This carbon addiction is a nasty sort, worse than heroine. The heroine addict has, surrounding him or her, the larger society of people who are productive and loving and healthy. As compelling as the heroine addiction may be, this other world is always there, always visible, always pulling and ready for a welcoming return.

    Where is the saner, sustainable, more democratic, more human-scaled and human-celebrating community offering a visible and attractive alternative to the over-mortgaged, over-consuming, over-stressed carbon addict? Have we put in place the better world we would have people move toward?

    It is interesting to be in a region where so many people escaped that corporate lemming treadmill in the 1960s and 70s to create just such communities. Some of the places survive as small communities or weekend retreats where friends may be free and happy. The parties are good, I am told. But gray heads cannot change the world alone, and, while escapism is healthy for personal renewal, it is not revolution, and revolution is what we need. It will come from people now in junior high school and younger.

    Do not despair; they are but a few years from voting, if voting will mean anything. We do not have to tell them about fairness or about the value of a healthy earth or the value of freedom. But we do have to give them ways to move their ideals into effective political action. Can we help them be more effective than we have done for ourselves? I think we can, and I will get to that.


Whole article from Truthout
http://www.truthout.org/docs_2006/053006S.shtml#
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

 

Return To TAT