Author Topic: Regime change in Egypt, too?  (Read 31824 times)

Toedancer

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Re: Regime change in Egypt, too?
« Reply #30 on: January 26, 2011, 03:23:06 PM »
Yes, european reaction is coming in now.

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Guido Westerwelle, the German foreign minister, said  he was "very concerned" and called on all concerned to show restraint:<blockquote>The   situation in Egypt must not escalate. The current situation in Egypt   ... underlines the necessity of democratisation, of respect for human   and civil rights. We are seeing in the last few weeks that a country's   stability is not endangered by granting civil rights; it is through the   refusal of civil and human rights that societies become unstable.</blockquote>The   office of Lady Ashton, the EU's foreign policy chief, said Egyptian   authorities should listen to their people, deal with their problems and   respect their right to demonstrate, urging the "Egyptian authorities to   respect and to protect the right of Egyptian citizens to manifest their   political aspirations"
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/blog/2011/jan/26/egypt-protests
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

skdadl

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Re: Regime change in Egypt, too?
« Reply #31 on: January 26, 2011, 03:35:17 PM »
Western governments are desperate to save Mubarak, or at least some semblance of his regime. So they are all babbling about doing this through reform of the current government. This is a revolution they really do not want.

deBeauxOs

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Regime change in Egypt, too?
« Reply #32 on: January 26, 2011, 03:41:04 PM »
Several indy videos of #jan25 protests in Alexandria & Cairo posted here.

deBeauxOs

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Regime change in Egypt, too?
« Reply #33 on: January 26, 2011, 03:53:09 PM »
...

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The office of Lady Ashton, the EU's foreign policy chief, said Egyptian authorities should listen to their people, deal with their problems and respect their right to demonstrate, urging the "Egyptian authorities to respect and to protect the right of Egyptian citizens to manifest their political aspirations"
Funny how *the office of Lady Ashton* left out the bit about "nemmind that we once told you to control that geographical zone by any means necessary - here's yr cheque - even if that means depriving your dumbass dusky-skinned peons of their human rights".
 ::)


ETA: Sophie Langlois' opinion piece in French.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2011, 04:19:55 PM by deBeauxOs »

Toedancer

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Re: Regime change in Egypt, too?
« Reply #34 on: January 26, 2011, 04:20:58 PM »
Funny how *the office of Lady Ashton* left out the bit about "nemmind that we once told you to control that geographical zone by any means necessary - here's yr cheque - even if that means depriving your dumbass dusky-skinned peons of their human rights".
 ::)

Hee. Well she had to be deployed at some point dB; wot with her punishing schedule...can u imagine the psychoanalysis bills these asshats would run their taxpayers if they were actually in analysis?

For those interested:

Flagrant EU Corruption in times of austerity
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Croghan27

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Re: Regime change in Egypt, too?
« Reply #35 on: January 26, 2011, 05:05:27 PM »
Just to put last summer in forus ....it was just mentioned on the CBC that three people have been killed today in Egyptian riots .......
 
The Egyption government has put 860 people in prison
 
GEEZE - the Harperthugs can round of a grand just for standing around. They need some good Canadian lessons.
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

deBeauxOs

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Regime change in Egypt, too?
« Reply #36 on: January 26, 2011, 05:53:50 PM »
Don't make a push for democratic change in Egypt if you can't back it up.

It's been tweeted that journalists following a group of protesters were told by police that they'd be allowed to leave safely.  In response the journos started a sit-down.  Not sure if this is Cairo, Alexandria or Suez - where the retaliation has been brutal, it's alleged police set fire to a building and a number of protesters have died

sparqui

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Re: Regime change in Egypt, too?
« Reply #37 on: January 26, 2011, 08:08:59 PM »
They interviewed a young 20 yr old female protester on As It Happens and she said that 6 protesters have been killed and at least 1000 arrested. They expect to have huge crowds after Friday prayers. She also adamantly denied that meme that it's an Islamic revolution, directed by the Muslim Brotherhood.

Speaking of official western bias, of course they're not welcoming revolutionary change. If it ain't got George Soros' (Open Society Institute) stamp of approval, it doesn't count as "democratic".
If my grandmother had wheels, she'd be a tractor. -- Gilles Duceppe

deBeauxOs

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Regime change in Egypt, too?
« Reply #38 on: January 26, 2011, 10:09:58 PM »
The role of internetworking as catharsis in Egypt - similar to the 'speak anger' technique used by oppressed groups (formally or informally) as a path to political action, with a contemporary digital application.

Toedancer

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Re: Regime change in Egypt, too?
« Reply #39 on: January 27, 2011, 10:58:51 AM »
Massacre in Suez  Total black out, not allowing any journos in. Some tweets say protesters pouring gas on cops/military and threatening to set on fire.

FB group saying cops using live ammunition

Haven't checked all sources, not even the Guardian yet, but this is obviously out of control and Obama's msg this a.m. of being more assertive with Mubarak means nothing.

"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

skdadl

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Re: Regime change in Egypt, too?
« Reply #40 on: January 27, 2011, 11:03:23 AM »
Has anyone seen an official statement from Israel? The Israeli gov really does not want upsets in Egypt.

Toedancer

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Re: Regime change in Egypt, too?
« Reply #41 on: January 27, 2011, 11:06:16 AM »
I haven't had time to look. One tweet says Egyptian military has taken over the police forces

ETA - Finally Clinton is questioned on just wtf 'stability' means.

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In an interview Tuesday on CNN's Connect the World, ElBaradei   disputed a recent comment from U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton   that the Egyptian government is stable. "Stability is when you   have a government that is elected on a free and fair basis. And we have   seen, you know, how the election has been rigged in Egypt. We have seen   how people have been tortured," he said.
I won't even link to cnn, they are misrepresenting the facts on the ground, but @ El Baradei is to take part in protests/willing to lead and of course the Muslim Brotherhood is saying moving along with it, but not inciting. Who knows though.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2011, 11:31:36 AM by Toedancer »
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

sparqui

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Re: Regime change in Egypt, too?
« Reply #42 on: January 27, 2011, 03:45:42 PM »
I sent an e-mail to a friend in Egypt and she had this to say:

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'm very scared ,,, although the news on the ground is alot calmer then what is going on on the net and the facebook ,,, but if  Mubarak  doesn't step down and give the people what they want ,, I think the Ekhwan will jump and take control ,, which will be the end of Egypt as we know it.
If my grandmother had wheels, she'd be a tractor. -- Gilles Duceppe

Toedancer

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Re: Regime change in Egypt, too?
« Reply #43 on: January 27, 2011, 09:32:15 PM »
Thanks sparks. Today I saw on CBC a short vid of a man being shot in the head by the Egyptian authorities. I couldn't believe it. Thought I would look for it...no go. But it did HAPPEN

CBC has got the footage. Fuck CBC, Here It Is Crimes Against Humanity right there!
« Last Edit: January 27, 2011, 09:40:50 PM by Toedancer »
"Democracy is not the law of the majority, it's the protection of the minority." -Albert Camus 1913-1960

Antonia

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Re: Regime change in Egypt, too?
« Reply #44 on: January 27, 2011, 09:54:01 PM »
Unfruckenbelievable

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Ahead of a day that could prove decisive, NewsHour host Jim Lehrer   asked Biden if the time has "come for President Mubarak of Egypt to go?"   Biden answered: "No. I think the time has come for President Mubarak to   begin to move in the direction that – to be more responsive to some...   of the needs of the people out there."
Asked if he would   characterize Mubarak as a dictator Biden responded: “Mubarak has been an   ally of ours in a number of things. And he’s been very responsible on,   relative to geopolitical interest in the region, the Middle East peace   efforts; the actions Egypt has taken relative to normalizing   relationship with – with Israel. … I would not refer to him as a   dictator.”
He also appeared to make one of the famous Biden   gaffes, in comments that could be interpreted as questioning the   legitimacy of protesters' demands. Monitor Cairo correspondent Kristen   Chick, other reporters in the country, and activists have generally   characterized the main calls of demonstrators as focused on freedom,   democracy, an end to police torture, and a more committed government   effort to address the poverty that aflicts millions of Egyptians.
Biden   urged non-violence from both protesters and the government and said:   "We’re encouraging the protesters to – as they assemble, do it   peacefully. And we’re encouraging the government to act responsibly and –   and to try to engage in a discussion as to what the legitimate claims   being made are, if they are, and try to work them out." He also said: "I   think that what we should continue to do is to encourage reasonable...   accommodation and discussion to try to resolve peacefully and amicably   the concerns and claims made by those who have taken to the street. And   those that are legitimate should be responded to because the economic   well-being and the stability of Egypt rests upon that middle class   buying into the future of Egypt."
Egypt's protesters, if they're   paying attention to Biden at all, will certainly be wondering which of   their demands thus far have been illegitimate.

As one of my Tweeps said: Wake-up People of the USA! You're next!
It is when we all play safe that we create a world of utmost insecurity. It is when we all play safe that fatality will lead us to our doom. It is in the "dark shade of courage" alone that the spell can be broken.
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