Author Topic: English syntax question  (Read 2727 times)

lagatta

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English syntax question
« on: March 14, 2011, 12:08:23 PM »
"cycling network seasons" or "cycling network's seasons"  I find the latter scans strangely.

(For skdadl or anyone else)...
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skdadl

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Re: English syntax question
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2011, 01:12:39 PM »
I don't understand what is meant or intended, so I don't know what would be correct. The expressions don't make any sense to me.

Holly Stick

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Re: English syntax question
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2011, 02:16:00 PM »
There is a cycling season, and there are cycling networks.  Something about a cycling network during cycling season?
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skdadl

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Re: English syntax question
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2011, 02:28:20 PM »
Well, I guess that

cycling-network seasons

would mean that, as would

the cycling network's seasons


ETA: To clarily: this is why we use hyphens sometimes. In the first example, although network is normally a noun, it is being used as half of an adjective modifying another noun, seasons. In the second, it is a noun preceded by an adjective and the hyphen is not required, but it is also a possessive noun, followed by another noun, which is ok: pogge's dog, eg.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2011, 02:32:10 PM by skdadl »

Antonia

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Re: English syntax question
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2011, 04:19:30 PM »
If it's a cycling network, as in a bunch of people who cycle, I am guessing ''the cycling network's seasons''
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lagatta

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Re: English syntax question
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2011, 08:03:28 AM »
Yes, I was looking over a rough draft of a translation someone else did about the seasons of the cycle/bike/bicycle path network (the three nouns are used to avoid too much repetition). I like skdadl's solution - they were avoiding too many articles in titles, but they have to make sense in context.

I remember teaching skdadl's point in ESL classes. On can't always translate the Latin "de" (le chien de pogge, il cane di pogge, el perro de pogge etc) as an 's possessive in English or other Germanic languages. I'm trying to think of examples of misuse, but brain has not yet had enough COFFEE.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

skdadl

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Re: English syntax question
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2011, 08:44:31 AM »
Well, you can say "the dog of pogge," but it sounds awkward. "The master of the house" doesn't, though.

You might be thinking of the times we drop apostrophes in titles or labels. Eg, you have to say "the Smiths' dog." But we usually use "the Carpenters Union" or "the Writers Union" w/o apostrophes, although I usually check. Not sure I can explain the subtle difference, but the noun turned into an adjective there isn't being a possessive, or doesn't have to be -- it's just an adjective.

pogge

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Re: English syntax question
« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2011, 09:13:39 AM »
Well, you can say "the dog of pogge," but it sounds awkward.
Not to mention the fact that he's not my dog; he's the dog of my roommate.

Croghan27

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Re: English syntax question
« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2011, 03:24:01 PM »
Well, you can say "the dog of pogge," but it sounds awkward.
Not to mention the fact that he's not my dog; he's the dog of my roommate.

Your rrremmate?
 
But the question is ....does your dog bite?
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