Author Topic: Kitchen pron 2  (Read 13833 times)

pookie

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Re: Kitchen pron 2
« Reply #30 on: July 31, 2011, 09:21:18 AM »
I have coveted a dutch oven for years (and specifically a Le Creuset dutch oven).  Somehow my cheap gene kicks in every time I get close to buying one though, which means I tend to kludge the bourguignonne (sp?) in a roasting pan.  The thought of finding one, unused, in a garage sale makes me want to rend my garments, and possibly my hair.

Most of my cooking happens on the approx. 50 lbs of cast iron we were handed by our former neighbour (and daycare provider extraordinaire).  5 pieces of iron, ranging from a wee single/double egg size pan to a monstrous thing that my 6 year old cannot lift but in which I can make a 12 egg omelette.  I love the cast iron.

Lately I've been enjoying making curries from scratch (last night was butter chicken).  Delicious, but man could I use one of those mid-size deep terracotta type oven dishes.

New house has a convection oven, which is interesting (I'm still getting used to it, to be honest).

Seriously, the cost per use is so worth it.  I have a Danish Copco enameled cast iron set from my mother - they're at least twenty years old and clean up like new.  Beautiful, too.

Boom Boom

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Re: Kitchen pron 2
« Reply #31 on: July 31, 2011, 10:34:05 AM »
I still use a covered roasting pan that my mother got at her wedding in 1939 I think it was, and I still have three or four very heavy cast iron frying pans that she brought herself in the 1960s - I don't use them often, but they're here when I need them.
 
I brought a cheap Teflon cookware set two years ago - pots and pans with glass lids - and I use them about every second or third day. The entire set cost about $75 with tax - and are very easy to clean, and need very little heat to cook.
 
From the same store I brought a cheap chef's knife set - less than $20 with a wooden block - use them every day, they're just cheapplastic handles with steel blades, but never need sharpening.
 
I inherited my parent's silverware (utensils) collection - use them every day. I had their collection of silver teapots and serving vessels but sent them to my brother who will pass them on to his kids - I had them for 20 years after mum died, never used them even once. They were a pain in the ass to keep polished, I was happy to get rid of them. But the silver knives, forks and spoons are a delight to use - they're heavy, and you can feel the quality.

lagatta

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Re: Kitchen pron 2
« Reply #32 on: July 31, 2011, 11:34:16 AM »
Once upon a time, it was possible to buy Le Creuset sets for a most reasonable price at department stores such as The Bay and the defunct Simpsons. I had one, but at times was living with roommates, who pretty much wrecked them. I only have a couple left, too small to be of much use. I'd very much like at least one or two more - they are very expensive now.

I remember a young couple nearby moving to New Zealand and selling their Le Creuset - cheap - but they also had a good-quality vacuum cleaner which I needed more. I was really too broke to buy both - pity dat. I want a pot to simmer tagines etc in, not too big or high (I know exactly the pot I want). Don't need a full set. I have a medium-sized cast-iron skillet made by Findlay Stoves, in Carleton Place, near Ottawa, and a tiny one that just says made in Canada. I gave away my huge ones, which I had bought for absurdly low prices at a very good charity sale held a couple of times each year nearby. I live alone most usually, and doubt very much I'll ever make a 12-egg omelette, even for guests. I rarely invite more than 3 or 4 friends over. (I do often invite friends, but most often one or two).

Arborman, I tend to find those terracotta dishes in Italian shops - I'm sure there are some in Vancouver as well.

Personally, I tend to avoid Teflon, but now there are non-stick pans with a ceramic coating that are supposed to be safe.

But living alone (though far from always eating alone), I'm trying not to have too much stuff - I didn't want any silverware. My flatware is good quality (gift from mum long ago), but it is stainless. Once again I cleaned out a lot of stuff from my cupboards and gave it to charity (Le Chaînon, which runs a centre for women who are homeless or in crisis). It is so hard to fight accumulitis and hoarding and I'm really trying to do one-in, one-out (or better, two out). I do have to do a clothing cull, a household linens cull (lots of this given or handed down), and the hardest of all, another book cull. I have bookcases in every room and the hallway. There are three in my office, one big pine one made by friends long ago almost reaches the ceiling.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Boom Boom

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Re: Kitchen pron 2
« Reply #33 on: July 31, 2011, 01:47:22 PM »
I have a couple of high quality casserole dishes, but they're really getting old - mum brought them in the 1960s, I'm still usng them - often. I'd love a new set of Le Creuset just to replace all the stuff here that dates back to the 1960s and earlier. My cooking cupboard looks like an antique store.

Antonia

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Re: Kitchen pron 2
« Reply #34 on: July 31, 2011, 02:19:04 PM »
My problem is, I have all this stuff but hardly ever cook anymore. I eat mostly salads myself, or grill on the BBQ
It is when we all play safe that we create a world of utmost insecurity. It is when we all play safe that fatality will lead us to our doom. It is in the "dark shade of courage" alone that the spell can be broken.
-- Dag Hammarskjöld

lagatta

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Re: Kitchen pron 2
« Reply #35 on: July 31, 2011, 02:43:08 PM »
Antonia, only reason that is a problem is high shipping costs; if not, you could send some to arborfamily.

Even now, after a couple of moves and more purges, I still have too many dishes for my needs. And am missing a couple of very specific items (geared to cooking on a small scale) that would be hard to find second hand.

I do like to make some tagines and similar stews in the cold months, and always make soup then.

I have to make something incorporating fresh peas, and a very small flat Asian cabbage. Are those what Koreans would choose to make kimchi?

(But no, not kimchi. Ashamed to say I don't like it).
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Herr Magoo

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Re: Kitchen pron 2
« Reply #36 on: August 02, 2011, 11:15:56 AM »
Quote
and a very small flat Asian cabbage. Are those what Koreans would choose to make kimchi?
Not specifically.  I think that "kimchi" is similar to the word "pickle" in the sense that, in North America anyway, if you just say "pickle", then dill is likely to be assumed.  But you can specify just about anything else.
Similarly, if you just say "kimchi" then you're probably talking about kimchi made with Napa cabbage and daikon, but you can also make kimchi out of all kinds of other vegetables.  I've made kimchi with regular green cabbage as well.
 
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lagatta

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Re: Kitchen pron 2
« Reply #37 on: August 02, 2011, 12:27:39 PM »
Interesting. In any case, I've made a curtido with most of the cabbage, sliced very thin, a carrot and a red onion. Marinated for a couple of days in a dilute vinegar solution - I actually have bought bottles of white wine vinegar for a dollar at a nearby store, so that, some water, some Greek or Lebanese reconstituted lemon juice (which I use for things like that - and also as a furniture-cleaning product!)

I think I explained what I did with the peas in another thread...
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Herr Magoo

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Re: Kitchen pron 2
« Reply #38 on: August 02, 2011, 07:31:31 PM »
I had to Google 'curtido' -- turns out I love it by its other name, Cole slaw! :)

That said, what I Googled suggested that curtido should be lightly fermented, which makes it interesting to me for the same reasons that kimchi and sauerkraut are.

Re: cast iron Dutch oven. Check out Ikea. They sell nice enameled (outside, not inside) cast iron Dutch ovens in two sizes for something like 50 and 70 bucks. Not Le Creuset, but cheaper than a replacement lid for a Le Creuset.  I have both the smaller and the larger, and I love them for curries, stews, cassoulet, and cabbage rolls. Oh, and no-knead bread!
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lagatta

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Re: Kitchen pron 2
« Reply #39 on: August 02, 2011, 08:17:52 PM »
Oh I love cole slaw too, though some supermarket versions are overly sweet and gloppy. The basic ingredients are the same - though I see that in some Mexican regions, it is mostly carrots - but curtido is very simply macerated with a a dilute acid and salt. One can add oil if desired, but just upon serving.

An Italo-Salvadorean café (run by the children of an Italian man and Salvadorean woman) nearby has a very pretty pink curtido - I'm sure they are using beet juice ... picked up from their Lebanese neighbours! Take that, Breivik.

I wonder why the IKEA are only enamelled outside - that limits what one can cook in them. A lot of good enamelled ware was made in Scandinavian countries a generation ago (old fartess comment).
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Antonia

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Re: Kitchen pron 2
« Reply #40 on: August 02, 2011, 10:01:22 PM »
The only cole slaw I like is Montreal Jewish deli kind. I'm in Montreal now, so this is good.

I had a lobster roll today in the Atwater Market.

Went to a traiteur in Westmount I like and bought, for less than the price of an okay meal out, two kinds of shrimp, veg spring rolls, sweet potato and regular potato latkes, grilled eggplant, a baguette, two pain au choc plus, with dandelions from the market ...

Just about to have it now.
It is when we all play safe that we create a world of utmost insecurity. It is when we all play safe that fatality will lead us to our doom. It is in the "dark shade of courage" alone that the spell can be broken.
-- Dag Hammarskjöld

Boom Boom

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Re: Kitchen pron 2
« Reply #41 on: August 02, 2011, 11:09:07 PM »
I don't know what is happening to me as I get older - I'm now deathly allergic to penicillin and antibiotic derivatives of penicillin, which I've never been before - and I'm also highly allergic to lobster, shrimp, and clams. I think the only shellfish I can handle are fresh local snow crab, and even those make me feel kind of woozy afterwards.    BTW, I make coleslaw at home - and I use a tiny splash of vinegar in addition to all the traditional ingredients. (can't remember if vinegar is actually a traditional ingredient in coleslaw!  :confused )

lagatta

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Re: Kitchen pron 2
« Reply #42 on: August 03, 2011, 06:47:38 AM »
Bummer, Boom Boom, especially living where those lovely Nordic shrimp come from. Fortunately, for the moment I don't have a seafood allergy. (Though of course the one I really fear developing is a cat allergy).
Hope you are doing better (though further discussion of that should go in a health thread) and saw on babble that you are signing "hearing gradually returning" which is wonderful news.

Antonia, yes, the Jewish deli coleslaw is very good. Have you ever had curtido with pupusas in Salvadorean restaurants? Often pupusas (stuffed corncakes cooked on the grill) are rather greasy, but they aren't greasy at all at Zitto e mangia.

Obviously I don't go to Atwater Market very often, but was there after the French boat (La Dignité) demonstration. I especially wanted to go to Warshaw Maison - that storied supermarket moved their housewares division to that area and have very good prices. I bought so much kitchen stuff there when I was much younger, when it was on the Main. (See, we get back to the thread topic). Saw the lobster rolls but didn't have one. I had to get back home and do some rush work.

Mmm, sweet potato latkes.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Boom Boom

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Re: Kitchen pron 2
« Reply #43 on: August 03, 2011, 07:31:48 AM »
With me it is actually a severe shellfish allergy that has developed - although I had fresh cod once in the hospital, and didn't care for it. I'm going to order some frozen fish (halibut mostly) from M&M and use it for fish 'n chips which still appeals to me.
 
I don't know how to explain how I'm losing my taste for fresh cod. It just seems so bland.  :confused
 
I'm going to have to start looking for those wrist bracelets that warn of penicillin allergies - I checked, and none of my brothers or their children have this allergy. This is new. :o

lagatta

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Re: Kitchen pron 2
« Reply #44 on: August 03, 2011, 08:09:19 AM »
Odd, I love fresh cod. Is a limited (local) fishery allowed on the Lower North Shore now? I remember having cod fresh off the docks in the Gaspé, but that was decades ago.

Halibut is lovely. Expensive usually. Of course all of these treats are probably becoming unsustainable.

Large pharmacies might sell the bracelets, I don't know. You could certainly order a medical alert bracelet online.

Just so you aren't allergic to the bracelets! I can only wear silver or gold earring posts (for pierced ears). Pity, as there are a lot of pretty costume jewellery earrings.

This should probably go in "what hurts" though, unless we are talking about allergies to cookware and appliances.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

 

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