Author Topic: Digital Libraries  (Read 27328 times)

Holly Stick

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« Last Edit: September 25, 2010, 04:36:17 PM by Holly Stick »
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

Holly Stick

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Re: Digital Libraries
« Reply #76 on: October 01, 2010, 09:35:04 PM »
Here's a cool website, where you can listen to scholars reading in Akkadian, the language of Babylon:
 
http://people.pwf.cam.ac.uk/mjw65/BAPLAR/Archive 
 
also   http://people.pwf.cam.ac.uk/mjw65/BAPLAR/Homepage
 
and links to similar projects about other languages:
 
http://people.pwf.cam.ac.uk/mjw65/BAPLAR/Links
 
 
Some blog & news articles about it:
 
http://www.ablogabouthistory.com/2010/09/30/audio-recordings-of-ancient-babylonian-poems/
 
http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/2000_years_since_anyones_heard_babylonian_poetry_r.php
 
CTV was where I first saw it, but they had no link:
 
http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/SciTech/20101001/babylon-stream-101001/
 
 
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

skdadl

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Re: Digital Libraries
« Reply #77 on: October 02, 2010, 05:12:52 AM »
I listened to some of the Anglo-Saxon, which I used to know a very little bit -- I recognize almost nothing now. To my ignorant ear, it sounds so much more like the Scandinavian languages than it does like German -- it doesn't sound like modern German at all. Especially striking is that pointed U sound, a sort of twirled "yew," which semi-survives in British and Canadian English but not American -- "avenyew" as distinct from "avenoo." In AS it really twirls though. And there is that lilt.

I wish they had someone doing Middle English, which is beautiful and which people actually can pick up without much formal training. The best reader of ME I've known was from Cape Breton -- it was as though he didn't even have to try much to get the sound and the rhythm.

lagatta

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Re: Digital Libraries
« Reply #78 on: October 02, 2010, 08:51:28 AM »
The sound shifts in Germanic languages are fascinating in themselves - the continental West Germanic language closest to English is Frisian, spoken in northern parts of the Netherlands and Germany. Modern German has undergone a sound shift not found in Dutch or English (not counting the Romance and Celtic influences on the latter). I'll be looking forward to hearing these files on Akkadian and the other languages linked.

Avenoo. Also stoopid, which sounds so ... stoopid.
" Eure \'Ordnung\' ist auf Sand gebaut. Die Revolution wird sich morgen schon \'rasselnd wieder in die Höhe richten\' und zu eurem Schrecken mit Posaunenklang verkünden: \'Ich war, ich bin, ich werde sein!\' "
Rosa Luxemburg

Holly Stick

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Re: Digital Libraries
« Reply #79 on: October 02, 2010, 11:05:48 AM »
I took an Anglo Saxon course and when I had to read aloud, the professor said I sounded like Ingrid Bergman, I seemed to be reading it with a Swedish accent.
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

skdadl

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Re: Digital Libraries
« Reply #80 on: October 02, 2010, 11:31:17 AM »
I've heard people read Shakespeare with what they're guessing was an early C17 accent -- no way I can reproduce that, but it is ... different.  Like ME, it's recognizably English, but it's different.

Croghan27

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Re: Digital Libraries
« Reply #81 on: October 02, 2010, 07:07:49 PM »
Quote
I wish they had someone doing Middle English, which is beautiful and   which people actually can pick up without much formal training.

Back in the .....  I used to pick up, every St. Valentine's Day, Chaucer's  Parlement of Foulys in the middle English. Even more than Canterbury the language, the ME, is so lovely that I enjoyed the tale rolling off my tongue.

I tried it again a couple of years ago .... nope! Gone  :crying . The pronunciation is lost and the metre is mixed. The synapses of my brain have lost their connections .... as JC would say:

Ther rede I wel he wol be lord and syre,
I dar not seyn, his strokes been so sore,   
But God save swich a lord! I can no more.   
"It is also a good rule not to put overmuch confidence in the observational results that are put forward until they are confirmed by theory." -- Arthur Stanley Eddington

Holly Stick

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Re: Digital Libraries
« Reply #82 on: December 13, 2010, 08:59:00 PM »
Documents about Acadian refugees in France in the 1700s:
 
http://www.septentrion.qc.ca/acadiens/
 
Collected by historian Jean-Francois Mouhot for his book; he has also produced a database of NGOs in the UK:
 
http://www.ngo.bham.ac.uk/
 
 
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

skdadl

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Re: Digital Libraries
« Reply #83 on: December 18, 2010, 10:08:43 PM »
Holly Stick (and others), take your time with this.

Also this.

Hie thee hither. Lulz ensueth.

Holly Stick

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Re: Digital Libraries
« Reply #84 on: December 24, 2010, 04:18:27 PM »
David Akin on digital libraries, with links:
 
http://davidakin.blogware.com/blog/_archives/2010/12/24/4711279.html
 
And the article by Robert Darnton which got him thinking:
 
http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2010/dec/23/library-three-jeremiads/
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

skdadl

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Re: Digital Libraries
« Reply #85 on: December 24, 2010, 06:18:27 PM »
Ooh -- haven't read it yet, but j'adore Robert Darnton, would read anything he writes, including his shopping lists.

Holly Stick

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Re: Digital Libraries
« Reply #86 on: January 09, 2011, 03:19:14 PM »
Here is a map of the English dialects in Canada and US, with notes and details of pronunciations.  It's done as a hobby by Rick Aschmann.  I found the link at HNN, which may explain the jump in popularity he mentions.
 
http://aschmann.net/AmEng/#LargeMap
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

Holly Stick

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Re: Digital Libraries
« Reply #87 on: January 11, 2011, 10:33:19 PM »
Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database; lots of maps, some images, information about 35,000 voyages and all sorts of stuff:
 
http://slavevoyages.org/tast/index.faces
 
And an article about "The Atlas of the Transatlantic Slave Trade" which is based on the database information:
 
Quote
...The Atlas also contains the story of Mahommah G. Baquaqua, who was enslaved probably in what is now western Nigeria in 1845 as a 20-year old. He was first taken to Recife in Brazil, and after a ship's captain purchased him in Rio de Janeiro, he was taken to New York where he escaped, fled to Haiti, and after returning to New York to study and then moving to Canada, he wrote his autobiography...

http://www.cnn.com/2011/OPINION/01/05/eltis.richardson.slave.trade/index.html?hpt=C2
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

Holly Stick

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Re: Digital Libraries
« Reply #88 on: January 20, 2011, 01:56:51 PM »
Canadiana includes a new Canadiana Discovery Portal for searching online collections; also Early Canadiana Online:
 
http://www2.canadiana.ca/en/home
 
Aaron Wherry found a speech by Lester Pearson:
http://www2.macleans.ca/2011/01/19/what-it-sounded-like/
 
Ted Betts found stuff about the Franklin Expedition:
http://franklinsghost.blogspot.com/2011/01/new-canadian-history-search-site.html
 
Economics is a human creation, borders are human creations and nature doesn’t give a damn about these things. - David Suzuki

 

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