Bread & Roses Forum

Smorgasbord => Gardens => Topic started by: skdadl on January 28, 2007, 05:57:03 PM

Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on January 28, 2007, 05:57:03 PM
So is anyone thinking about starting seedlings indoors? Did anyone save rhizomes or tubers from last year that could maybe be brought back to life starting a few weeks from now?

Yes, I know ... This is wishful thinking, jumping the gun, and all that. But it isn't so far away, not so far. Gardens need prep, and we need to be thinking ahead.

All voices of experience about any growing thing welcome. Any good online sources especially welcome.

This is the first year in so many that I have not had a set of forced hyacinths sitting in my kitchen about now. Does anyone else have hyacinths or tulips or crocii on their windowsills? Happy daffy daffs?
Title: gardens
Post by: faith on January 28, 2007, 06:13:44 PM
YES! I have been contemplating getting things started because out here on the west coast you can actually have a harvest of plants that love cool temperatures by April or May, like snow peas, lettuce, green onions and some others.
I was wondering about a sweet potato that I have in a basket in the kitchen window that has green leaves sprouting out of it, could I plant the potato and would it grow?

I was reading the latest Harrowsmith magazine and some of the helpful tips were great for an early garden. One of the tips that I am definitely going to use is using the plastic clam shell lettuce containers as a sort of greenhouse seed starter kit.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on January 28, 2007, 06:28:14 PM
I started a thread like this on babble, as an outgrowth of another thread. I forgot about youse guys! :oops:

Anyway, I'll be starting a few indoor plants in March (too early right now). Here's some stuff I have on order:

Seeds: German Chamomile, Music Box Sunflower Mix, Autumn Beauty Sunflower Mix, Razzmatazz Sunflower Mix, Go Bananas Sunflower Mix,
Eastern Butterwax Bean, Provider Beans, Wax Bean Collection, Varied Carrot Collection, Temptation Strawberry (to start indoors), Red Beauty Onion, Sweet Pepper Collection (to start indoors), Varied Tomato Collection (to start indoors), Varied Cuke Collection, Perennial Herb Collection, Annual Herb Collection, Sun Carrot, Parade Organic Onion,
Howden Organic Pumpkin, Tyee Organic Spinach;

and: Jersey Giant Asparagus Roots  :garden
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on January 28, 2007, 06:32:40 PM
Look at these women (http://www.hillkeep.ca/about_us.htm) in BC.

Go to their Plants Index, and then on to pages like this one on species lilies. (http://www.hillkeep.ca/bulbs%20lilium.htm)
Title: gardens
Post by: faith on January 28, 2007, 07:08:17 PM
Gardening in BC is a mania, people have the most fantastic gardens I have ever seen, unfortunately I am not among their number.

But I will keep on trying.

I was thinking of some early lettuce, some snow peas, chives, green beans, and of course we have some garlic in the ground that was planted in October.

I discovered Japanese eggplant last year and absolutely loved it as a vegetable and will be growing it again. My English cukes did well as did my beefsteak tomatoes and my golden tomatoes. We had golden beefsteaks as well and they were delicious if you like sweet and mild rather than tangy tomatoes.

I will not bother with peppers as they were very slow growing and I did not get a good crop except for these little wee peppers that were so hot you couldn't let them near your mouth.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on January 28, 2007, 07:19:44 PM
My favourite online places:

http://www.seeds.ca/en.php (http://www.seeds.ca/en.php) (Seeds of Diversity)

http://www.veseys.com/ca/en/ (http://www.veseys.com/ca/en/) (Veseys)

http://www.dominion-seed-house.com/en-CA/ (http://www.dominion-seed-house.com/en-CA/)  (Dominon Seed House)
Title: gardens
Post by: faith on January 28, 2007, 07:56:19 PM
Boom Boom your plan for your garden sounds ambitious. I like the looks of some of the new carrots I have seen, or maybe they're very old carrot varieties, but I would particularly like to try the golden carrots I have seen and the golden beets I ate in a restaurant last year.
Title: Re: gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on January 28, 2007, 09:12:51 PM
I forgot to mention I'll also be planting: Sugar Baby Watermelon, Yellow Doll Watermelon, Early Purple Top White Globe turnip, York Turnip, and
Solid Gold Watermelon.  :eat  And that's in addition to about eight flower varieties from last year.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on January 28, 2007, 09:23:29 PM
I have a lot of seeds stored up - some of them impulse purchases - and I don't know if I'll use them. I'm planning a small garden: 2 or 3 square metres only. I can always expand in subsequent years if I want to.

My main project will be to build a composter, following a pretty simple plan in You Grow Girl (http://www.yougrowgirl.com/book/aboutbook.php), by Gayla Trail (which I always suspected is a pen name, but maybe not). Anyway, we we'll be building a new deck and replacing all the pipes in our house this summer, the garden will have to be rather unambitious if I'm to keep my sanity.

The only thing I'll be starting early is a few tomato plants (I wasn't even going to do that, but I can't resist) and the rest will be planted in the spring. I'm not sure what the final mix will be except I know I want bucketsfull of Swiss chard. I love that stuff and you can rarely find it in the grocery store.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on January 28, 2007, 09:28:04 PM
Q: how long do seeds keep in those small paper packets before you have to plant them? I'm going to have far more seeds than space to plant them all - although I could plant them out in the bush, on Crown land... :spy:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Berlynn on January 29, 2007, 12:55:05 AM
Oh, gardening at BnR!  I truly am in the right place!

I'm picking up seeds from Prairie Garden Seeds (http://www.prseeds.ca/index.html) in a couple of weeks and then I'll start seedlings, especially tomatoes.  Did not have near enough tomatoes last year.  And my cukes were toast.  And the damned tree squirrels ate my zucchini!  From my kitchen window I watched one chow down on a 6-8 inch one.  It was all gone before I realized what went down!  I think I'll grow those on trellises this year.

Oh, and I love canning almost as much as growing.  I have the best pickle and relish recipes, one of which has been passed down on my dad's side of the family for 5 generations.  The best dills ever!

Wish I could enjoy weeding, though!  Too many years on the farm.  Serious first-born daughter action.

Ah, so what was the question?  Am I thinking about gardening?  Gawd, yes, I surely am!  I mean, what else can one do in SK in January?

PS:  Has anyone read Bob Kroetsch's, Seed Catalogue? (http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?sts=t&an=kroetsch&y=10&tn=seed+catalogue&x=30)
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on January 29, 2007, 07:40:43 AM
Quote
Did not have near enough tomatoes last year


Berlynn, you must be a serious canner. I have never heard anyone else who grows tomatoes say that there weren't enough. People here start doing desperate things with the tomato overflow by end August. You run from friends who are trying to press some upon you.  :wink:

Sadly, my first major operation in the garden in spring -- after I've cleared out all the dead weeds before the new ones can get started -- is going to have to be removing the dear dead birch. Hell: that lovely tree stood, but broken, all last summer as a reproach and an emblem of misery -- I just couldn't bear to do anything about it.

I think that my beautiful new climbing rose came through all the neglect, though. I planted her in summer '05, after taking three days to dig out a sick red currant bush that I had never liked anyway to make room. She  didn't flower last summer and was eventually obscured by weeds --   :oops:  -- but I have since beaten a path to her and she looks to me to have taken hold.  This should be her first year of glory. I've grown her before -- her real name is Shropshire Lass, but we used to call ours Ariadne because of the vast webs she sent out. She has very dark green shiny leaves, and in mid-June she will be covered every day for weeks with pale pink buds which open flat white, like a wild rose, during the day.

I must take care of her this year. And I must be more grateful to the Arctic blue willow, which is so gorgeous but deserves more regular haircuts.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: lagatta on January 29, 2007, 08:36:10 AM
Not precisely garden planning, but is anyone good at taking slips from geraniums, both the flowering kind and the scented ones? I saved several geraniums this winter (very sunny front room) and have a huge gnarled lemon geranium. I want to cut it back quite a bit, but make a daughter plant or two from it.

I'm not always successful, either in water (rots) or in vermiculite (doesn't take)...
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Sleeping Sun on January 29, 2007, 08:54:06 AM
What is this "garden planning" you are talking about?
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on January 29, 2007, 09:01:12 AM
lagatta, I have had pelargonium-propagation success just by plunking the cuttings straight into soil.

If you have one of those seed trays that look sort of like ice-cube trays (or maybe just use an ice-cube tray?), then fill all the little compartments with some soil; insert 3-inch pieces of stem in each one, and water lightly.

I forget how long it takes before you can see them beginning to leaf again, but they will -- you may lose a few, but mostly that works.

NB: Pelargonium is technically the correct name for the plants we're talking about here; true geraniums are bushy and fairly hardy perennials, also very beautiful, often blue or purply-pink.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: lagatta on January 29, 2007, 09:12:28 AM
Yes, I knew they weren't true geraniums; very hardy plants, those, we've planted some in front of the co-op, along with other perennials. But that is what people usually call pelargoniums, both the ones with bright flowers and the ones with a variety of lacy, scented leaves.

Pelargoniums aren't hardy here, but in somewhat milder temperate climates they are perennial; in Perugia they become big, gnarly bushes full of red flowers - and Perugia gets a few degrees of frost, and some snow most every year (not this one...) because it is atop a very high hill or small mountain, and the area is very hilly, rising to low mountains (Appenine ridge). Mine were outside this autumn almost until December, which is unheard of here. They kept flowering.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Debra on January 29, 2007, 09:18:02 AM
I brought in a geranium, about 4 large coleus, and a trailing plant.

The cats destroyed the coleus, the kids knocked over the urn containing the rest of the plants and all I have left is the trailing plant.  :x

I really want to start seeds and I always say I will and then I don't. So like a Stanley Cup...maybe this year.  :D
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on January 29, 2007, 09:20:46 AM
Quote from: Sleeping Sun
What is this "garden planning" you are talking about?


For me, it's 'planning the garden'. I'm weighing the balance between what I want to plant, against what I actually have space for. I'm going to have the perimeter of my property (on the shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, of which I have an excellent view from my LR) seeded with sunflowers, which will be sort of a fence between mine and both my neighbours properties. I have two small flower gardens, and one good-sized veggie garden, which will have quite a variety of herbs, veggies, and fruits, all of which are expensive at the local store. I'm hoping to build a greenhouse, but that will depend on the cost.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: 'lance on January 29, 2007, 10:06:40 AM
And for me it's actually planning just to have a garden -- for the first time in sixteen year, by gar. This nice old duplex back in Victoria was the last place I've lived where I could have a garden, and I moved out of there before I could harvest.

I suppose I could dig up a portion of the grassy quad at this building, though the landscum would probably frown on it. Pity, because it's kind of scraggly and poorly-kept as it is. Probably not enough sunlight, though.

But never mind all that -- this year I'm finally getting a plot at the nearest community garden. Which is still around ten blocks away, but whatever.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Berlynn on January 29, 2007, 10:40:51 AM
Quote from: lagatta
Not precisely garden planning, but is anyone good at taking slips from geraniums, both the flowering kind and the scented ones?


I've never done it myself, but my Auntie used to do it all the time.  She'd take a couple of cuttings, plant them in potting soil and cover each one with a clear glass to get the hot house effect.  Worked like a charm!  She always had great geraniums.  Unfortunately, she no longer gardens and I firmly believe that's part of the reason for her on-and-off depression.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Berlynn on January 29, 2007, 10:56:06 AM
Quote from: skdadl
Berlynn, you must be a serious canner.

Ah, skdadl, yes, I come from a long line of good peasant stock!  And yes, I take it seriously.  I'm a little miffed that we'll run out of tomato sauce, salsa, and dills before spring, but it couldn't be helped.  I also tried sauerkraut last fall and failed miserably.  October is not a good time for me to be canning!

Quote from: skdadl
Sadly, my first major operation in the garden in spring -- after I've cleared out all the dead weeds before the new ones can get started -- is going to have to be removing the dear dead birch.

I cried, when at our last house the neighbour hacked out a beautiful honeysuckle that bloomed ferociously each year.  I can't imagine removing a beloved tree myself, even if it wasn't healthy.  I'd have to salvage part of it for yard art or something!

I lucked into a plum tree last fall and planted it in our front yard.  I really want plum sauce this summer!  But I wanted nanking cherry jam last year and it didn't happen.  The trick to fruit trees, I've learned, is to harvest the fruit before the birds do!

Quote from: skdadl
I think that my beautiful new climbing rose came through all the neglect, though.


Oh, I love roses.  We have two native prairie roses out front and a 3rd of a different variety which I discovered upon hard-pruning the lilac monster that stands across the sidewalk from the new plum tree.  I wish I could have a willow but I don't know of any drought tolerant types that would stand for the -25 we felt overnight.

One of the reasons I fell in love with this place is the trees.  Another is the gardens.  Perennial beds all around the front, all around the back, and there's a lovely, sunny patch for vegetables -- all on a 125-foot lot.  The blooms start in April and they go on strong until October.  Kinda makes the intervening months tolerable.   :wink:

(ETA: counting error on roses0
Title: Garden planning
Post by: lagatta on January 29, 2007, 11:03:49 AM
Should I start the geranium cuttings now, or wait a few weeks?
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Berlynn on January 29, 2007, 11:07:34 AM
Quote from: lagatta
Should I start the geranium cuttings now, or wait a few weeks?


I remember her having them in pots on her birthday in early February.  But I suppose that might depend on where you live...
Title: Garden planning
Post by: lagatta on January 29, 2007, 11:09:28 AM
That sounds about right - the days are noticeably longer then, and the light changes. Think I'll do it at the Lunar New Year.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Berlynn on January 29, 2007, 11:16:19 AM
Yes, after Brighid's Day (http://altreligion.about.com/b/a/142614.htm) should be perfect.  (Not a great link, but a link, nonetheless.  Oh, I'll bet the Druid's link (http://druidry.org/obod/deities/brigid.html) is better.)  

Anyway, I'd forgotten that lovely day is this week!  Oh, the sun is returning and within a dozen weeks, there may be blooms in my yard!!! :D
Title: Garden planning
Post by: chcmd on January 29, 2007, 11:37:37 AM
Quote from: Boom Boom
Q: how long do seeds keep in those small paper packets before you have to plant them? I'm going to have far more seeds than space to plant them all - although I could plant them out in the bush, on Crown land... :spy:


Seeds are usually good for a couple of years as long as you store them thoughtfully (dry, not too cold, dark)

Oh I really miss gardening in BC, what a change here on the east coast!  I would do anything to have a greenhouse so I could start seedings etc., but it's really not feasable here in the house (drives the family crazy, little pots of seedlings cluttering up every space that light comes in!).

I have really had to change my gardening routine, most especially the start date!  So darned cold out here in the spring!  I bought some really cool "hats" from Lee Valley that protect the spring babies from the cold, so I can do some gardening before June *hrumph*.

I drag my geraniums inside for the winter and put them in a sunny spot in the house.  They make out really well - I have 5 pots that will be going back outside in the summer for the fourth year, they are really big!  They flower all winter too.

I have a Rosemary bush that I plant in the garden in its container and dig up and put in the garage (by the window) for the winter.  It is a good 4 years old and stands about 3 feet tall.  I think I will have to transplant it into a 1/2 barrel this spring - god knows how I will get it inside next winter!
Title: Garden planning
Post by: lagatta on January 29, 2007, 11:49:07 AM
I see the Year of the Pig (http://www.postescanada.ca/personal/collecting/default-f.asp?stamp=stpdtl&detail=1787) stamp is out now. Though not the thing to send to observant Muslims or Jews!
Title: Garden planning
Post by: shaolin on January 29, 2007, 11:49:25 AM
I wish I had a garden to plan!  I also wish I knew how to garden!  There is a student allotment that some friends are involved in, and a group has been talking about trying to get a plot in one of the community gardens, but I still need to know how.  With cooking, I taught myself.  With growing food, I am not so confident.  I feel like some hand holding.  I am still contemplating wwoofing.

We have a small space out back where I work.  Last year someone planted a bunch of bulbs, so we had some nice cut flowers in the space grown right here, instead of brought in by the wholesaler.

I am struggling to get our compost up and running again.  I am very nervous because there is strong resistance by certain folks involved (we were once shut down for two days by environmental health due to flies and rats).  I've been doing lots of reading, and I know in theory it should not be a problem, but the nay-sayers have given me the fear!
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on January 29, 2007, 11:51:07 AM
From the other thread on 'nutritionism':

8. Cook. And if you can, plant a garden. To take part in the intricate and endlessly interesting processes of providing for our sustenance is the surest way to escape the culture of fast food and the values implicit in it: that food should be cheap and easy; that food is fuel and not communion. The culture of the kitchen, as embodied in those enduring traditions we call cuisines, contains more wisdom about diet and health than you are apt to find in any nutrition journal or journalism.  Plus, the food you grow yourself contributes to your health long before you sit down to eat it. So you might want to think about putting down this article now and picking up a spatula or hoe.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Berlynn on January 29, 2007, 12:12:21 PM
Quote from: shaolin
I am struggling to get our compost up and running again.  I am very nervous because there is strong resistance by certain folks involved (we were once shut down for two days by environmental health due to flies and rats).


Some people get really weird about compost bins.  I mean, would they rather the flies and rats were in their houses?!?  Our composter is an old plastic garbage can -- a big one -- with about 100 holes drilled in it for aeration.  We fill it up then work it into the garden each spring and fall.  Makes for great soil.

Below are just some of my gardening links (some may well be dead).  I find I don't visit them as often as I once did.  I was heavily into container gardening at our last house and found some great links and had some success with it.  It's great for an urban space.  Mostly, I think, gardening is a matter of trial and error.  Don't be afraid to try and don't be afraid to fail.  In fact, be prepared to be the biggest failure ever and you'll be pleased with the results!

http://www.herbfresh.com/oldindex.htm (http://www.herbfresh.com/oldindex.htm)
http://www.aces.edu/department/extcomm/ ... -1139.html (http://www.aces.edu/department/extcomm/publications/anr/anr-1139/anr-1139.html)
http://www.suite101.com/articles.cfm/bohemian_balcony (http://www.suite101.com/articles.cfm/bohemian_balcony)
http://www.botany.com/ (http://www.botany.com/)
http://www.winnipeg-bugline.com/comp_pl.html (http://www.winnipeg-bugline.com/comp_pl.html)
http://www.canadiangardening.com/ (http://www.canadiangardening.com/)
http://www.transy.edu/homepages/wells/index.htm (http://www.transy.edu/homepages/wells/index.htm)
http://www.cityfarmer.org/urbagnotes1.html#notes (http://www.cityfarmer.org/urbagnotes1.html#notes)
http://paridss.usask.ca/specialcrop/com ... links.html (http://paridss.usask.ca/specialcrop/commodity/herb_spice/links.html)
http://www.hitech.net.au/utegrrl/table.htm (http://www.hitech.net.au/utegrrl/table.htm)
http://www.ghorganics.com/page2.html#LARKSPUR (http://www.ghorganics.com/page2.html#LARKSPUR):
http://www.wimall.com/lifeisgood/index003.html (http://www.wimall.com/lifeisgood/index003.html)
http://www.bagelhole.org/article.php/Food/122/ (http://www.bagelhole.org/article.php/Food/122/)
http://www.rainyside.com/edibles/ (http://www.rainyside.com/edibles/)
http://www.cityregina.com/services/enviro/compost.shtml (http://www.cityregina.com/services/enviro/compost.shtml)
http://www.familygardening.com/ (http://www.familygardening.com/)
http://berrygrape.orst.edu/fruitgrowing ... rowing.htm (http://berrygrape.orst.edu/fruitgrowing/fruitgrowing.htm)
http://soilandhealth.org/03sovereigntyl ... 05ch5.html (http://soilandhealth.org/03sovereigntylibrary/0302%20homestedlibrary/030201/03020105ch5.html)
http://www.hickson.com/planterbench.gif (http://www.hickson.com/planterbench.gif)
http://home.golden.net/%7Estinson/Pondsandpools.html (http://home.golden.net/%7Estinson/Pondsandpools.html)
http://www.GardenGateMagazine.com/ (http://www.GardenGateMagazine.com/)
http://familyhaven.com/gardening/index.html (http://familyhaven.com/gardening/index.html)
http://www.wholeherb.com/PAGES/HOME/HerbOutdoor.html (http://www.wholeherb.com/PAGES/HOME/HerbOutdoor.html)
http://www.rhubarbinfo.com/rhubarb-growing.html (http://www.rhubarbinfo.com/rhubarb-growing.html)
http://www.bhg.com/default.sph/bhg.clas ... 72___1___3 (http://www.bhg.com/default.sph/bhg.class?FNC=story__Agardensub_html___2___0___44___344___14472___1___3)
http://www.gardenguides.com/TipsandTech ... tainer.htm (http://www.gardenguides.com/TipsandTechniques/container.htm)
http://160.79.243.32/herbs/herbs1208.html (http://160.79.243.32/herbs/herbs1208.html)
http://www.homestore.com/lawngarden/law ... s/site.asp (http://www.homestore.com/lawngarden/lawn/Garden_Plans/site.asp)
http://www.hooked.net/users/verdant/food.htm (http://www.hooked.net/users/verdant/food.htm)
http://www.freespace.net/%7Ecog-pww/Jan ... etter.html (http://www.freespace.net/%7Ecog-pww/Jan99Newsletter.html)
http://www.execpc.com/%7Emjstouff/artic ... weeds.html (http://www.execpc.com/%7Emjstouff/articles/no_weeds.html)
http://community-2.webtv.net/BUDMUGS/LucysGarden/ (http://community-2.webtv.net/BUDMUGS/LucysGarden/)
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Troy/22 ... #summaries (http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Troy/2214/lunar.htm#summaries)
http://208.156.226.50/articledetails.taf?id=124 (http://208.156.226.50/articledetails.taf?id=124)
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/pars ... ive20.html (http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/parsons/99archive20.html)
http://www.groworganic.com/ (http://www.groworganic.com/)
http://em.ca/garden/home.html (http://em.ca/garden/home.html)
http://www.egardenplace.com/?BISKIT=315 ... cat&cat=43 (http://www.egardenplace.com/?BISKIT=3158646484&CONTEXT=cat&cat=43)
http://www.dlcwest.com/%7Erhs/newsletter.html (http://www.dlcwest.com/%7Erhs/newsletter.html)
http://www.ci.seattle.wa.us/util/rescon ... ng/faq.htm (http://www.ci.seattle.wa.us/util/rescons/composting/faq.htm)
http://www.taoherbfarm.com/herbs/resources/drought1.htm (http://www.taoherbfarm.com/herbs/resources/drought1.htm)
http://www.ext.vt.edu/departments/envir ... tgrdn.html (http://www.ext.vt.edu/departments/envirohort/articles/vegetables/contgrdn.html)
http://www.greenbuilder.com/sourcebook/ ... line4.html (http://www.greenbuilder.com/sourcebook/XeriscapeGuideline4.html)
http://www.flinet.com/%7Egallus/sqft.html (http://www.flinet.com/%7Egallus/sqft.html)
http://www.tvorganics.com/main.cfm?acti ... tterTips#3 (http://www.tvorganics.com/main.cfm?action=showNewsletterTips#3)
http://www.silverlf.com/barrick/ (http://www.silverlf.com/barrick/)
http://garden-gate.prairienet.org/teaching.htm (http://garden-gate.prairienet.org/teaching.htm)
http://colleenscorner.com/Garden.html (http://colleenscorner.com/Garden.html)
http://gardeninglaunchpad.com/ (http://gardeninglaunchpad.com/)
http://www.kcinter.net/%7Emule/ (http://www.kcinter.net/%7Emule/)
http://www.urbangarden.com/ (http://www.urbangarden.com/)
http://icangarden.com/OrganicGrowing/organic16.htm (http://icangarden.com/OrganicGrowing/organic16.htm)
http://www.weeksberry.com/BLUE.HTML (http://www.weeksberry.com/BLUE.HTML)
http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/veggies/ (http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/veggies/)
http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/veggies/watermelon1.html (http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/veggies/watermelon1.html)
http://pollinator.com/Identify/whatsbuzzin.htm (http://pollinator.com/Identify/whatsbuzzin.htm)
http://www.freeyellow.com/members6/wiseweeds/ (http://www.freeyellow.com/members6/wiseweeds/)
http://www.wildaboutgardening.org/en/gr ... /index.htm (http://www.wildaboutgardening.org/en/growing/section4/index.htm)
http://www.beniciagarden.com/ (http://www.beniciagarden.com/)
http://www.transy.edu/homepages/wells/pond.htm (http://www.transy.edu/homepages/wells/pond.htm)
http://hometown.aol.com/rosebasil/VOODOOSTIX.html (http://hometown.aol.com/rosebasil/VOODOOSTIX.html)
http://www.organicgardening.com/feature ... 50,00.html (http://www.organicgardening.com/feature/0,7518,s1-5-16-1350,00.html)
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Debra on January 29, 2007, 12:38:26 PM
I've been looking for a cheap easy but covered composter, Berlynn. The garbage pail sounds like just the thing.

Can I get more info? Do you put an soil in it? keep it in sun or shade? water it all? do you get any smell off it?
Title: Garden planning
Post by: shaolin on January 29, 2007, 12:44:30 PM
Quote
Some people get really weird about compost bins. I mean, would they rather the flies and rats were in their houses?!? Our composter is an old plastic garbage can -- a big one -- with about 100 holes drilled in it for aeration. We fill it up then work it into the garden each spring and fall. Makes for great soil.


I suppose for us the problem is it is a cafe, not a home, and therefore we must contend with the environmental health folks.  If something goes wrong and there is a fly or rat infestation just outside our doors that is bad, bad, bad.

The other thing is that we don't have a compelling use for all the good compost we'll create (think 30 avocados, 15 heads of lettuce, 20 tomatoes, 20 peppers, oodles of coffee grinds, etc each day).  For me, that quantity is the exact reason we need to be composting and not sending it to the landfill.

So, right now we're trying to decide whether to go with the council provided black bin (bottomless), or to buy an expensive, but perhaps 'safer' worm compost.

Berlynn - if you use a garbage bin for your compost, does that mean you don't turn it at all?
Title: Garden planning
Post by: brebis noire on January 29, 2007, 12:46:35 PM
Quote
Our composter is an old plastic garbage can -- a big one -- with about 100 holes drilled in it for aeration.  We fill it up then work it into the garden each spring and fall.  Makes for great soil.


You just described my composter!  :) However, I can't vouch for the quality of the soil it produces because although I compost vast amounts, I'm not very good at taking care of it. Actually, the old plastic garbage can isn't big enough for what I produce (at least during the winter when it just piles up) and comes out the bottom isn't quite soil-ready. So what I do is dig a big ol' hole in the garden in the spring and bury it so it can continue composting out of sight. I trust the critters to take care of the rest, I can't do all the work around here.  :wink:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on January 29, 2007, 01:08:17 PM
shaolin, although I haven't noticed them so much around the Forth, whenever we drove to the north of Scotland (north of Drumochter Pass, maybe), I would begin to notice a lot of homes with geodesic domes in their back gardens -- I assume those are greenhouses, the only way northerners could be growing something like tomatoes. On the north coast around Thurso/Scrabster, almost every home seemed to have a dome. So someone in Scotland is keen on producing them.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Berlynn on January 29, 2007, 02:08:16 PM
Quote from: Debra
I've been looking for a cheap easy but covered composter, Berlynn. The garbage pail sounds like just the thing.

Can I get more info? Do you put an soil in it? keep it in sun or shade? water it all? do you get any smell off it?


I don't know where I got the idea, but there's this (http://www.ehow.com/how_16876_make-compost-bin.html).  At our first house we (ah, I guess that's DH) built a beautiful, double-binned composter so we could have two batches going at once.  The kidlings were small then and they loved to help move it around.  At the container planting house, we came up with the bin thing which we filled with kitchen scraps, then mixed with old soil, grass cuttings and leaves.

Now, it gets filled it with whatever, gets set wherever, dumped into the garden in the spring, and worked it into the soil.  I have a patch at the back where I (ah, uh, we) do the bulk of the mixing.  I still do some container planting, so I dump the old soil back there,too, and enrich it.  I also do some trench composting (http://www.saskwastereduction.ca/composting/compost.html) too.  We have heavy clay soil here so amendments to the soil are essential.

But to the compost collected in the bin itself, I do nada.  Nix.  Nothing.  By the end of winter, though, it is overflowing and we did discuss getting another bin happening.  But then, we've discussed many things and our follow-through isn't always 100%.

As for the cafe, you might want to consider worm composting.  It's a much more tidy way of composting.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: 'lance on January 29, 2007, 02:24:34 PM
I plan to start with worm composting, under the kitchen sink. Vancouver will sell you a worm composter for $25, provided you attend a one-hour session on how to use it.

When the quantities start to build up, I'll transfer them to some sort of bin in the courtyard. Landscum shouldn't get too exercised about that, provided it doesn't smell enough for anyone to complain. And in case of rats, there are plenty of neighbourhood (outdoor) cats -- including one 20-pounder who lives upstairs, and apparently regards the courtyard as his personal fiefdom.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: gunnar gunnarson on January 29, 2007, 04:21:40 PM
Where did I read it ... ?

"The English will garden on the ash-heap of Hell."
Title: Garden planning
Post by: deBeauxOs on January 29, 2007, 09:31:48 PM
Quote from: gunnar gunnarson
Where did I read it ... ? "The English will garden on the ash-heap of Hell."
And run the chip fryer (or would it be the friar chipper?  :? ) as well ... :wink:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on January 29, 2007, 09:40:18 PM
Quote from: deBeauxOs
Quote from: gunnar gunnarson
Where did I read it ... ? "The English will garden on the ash-heap of Hell."
And run the chip fryer (or would it be the friar chipper?  :? ) as well ... :wink:


Reminds me of the joke about the Monastic Cafe run by the Chip monk and the Fish friar.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on February 04, 2007, 01:15:39 PM
Found some great links to greenhouses and building them. I have a pile of old windows that I think I'll use to make a small greenhouse out on the edge of the property, and a modern plastic greenhouse right against the main house, 'lean-to' style. I'm going crazy with ordering seeds and seedlings for the spring. Now I'm ordering roses, and a couple of trees, as well as all those veggies and flowers for planting. :garden
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on February 04, 2007, 01:29:51 PM
Oh, I want to go and visit my fledgling rose, but it is so demmed cold here.

Winter: enough, already.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on February 04, 2007, 01:48:14 PM
The wind here is unreal. I and my house may end up in Kansas tonight.  :shock:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on February 04, 2007, 01:52:10 PM
If you end up in Kansas, boom boom, winter will end earlier. :)

Just randomly, today, I started a golden pear-shaped tomato in a peat pot that I'd had leftover because whatever I'd planted in there before didn't take. I wasn't planning on starting any tomatoes from seed - I was just going to get a few plants already started at the garden centre - but I had an extra peat pot with soil, so I thought I'd try it out again.

So far, the parsley and the catnip are the greatest successes. We moved our basil and sage (the laggards) upstairs and hopefully the extra warmth will do them good. It was when we moved the catnip upstairs that it really took off.

It's snowing here again. :(
Title: Garden planning
Post by: alisea on February 04, 2007, 01:54:45 PM
I just looked at the weather for Natashquan, in Boom Boom's neck of the woods. The ambient temp's -12°C, the wind chill's -26, and the wind is 74 gusting to 98.

Let us all, together, send warm and calming thoughts  :lol:  :lol:

And if they don't work, BB, I'd put those red shoes on pronto, just in case you need them later :-)
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on February 04, 2007, 02:51:04 PM
Thanks for the warm thoughts. Natshquan is 44 km away by skidoo, about 30 as the crow flies. I had to put duct tape around the main door entrance, because the wind is so strong it's able to blow through the weatherstripping. Now, where are my ruby slippers?  :oops:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on February 04, 2007, 08:01:03 PM
(http://www.veseys.com/ca/en/images/products/small/446.jpg)

Anyone grow catnip? Apparently you can use it in salads and tea. Just had an image in my mind of a cat enjoying a 'cuppa'.
 :lol:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on February 05, 2007, 06:53:45 AM
Yes, catnip is a form of mint (some people call it "catmint"), so it grows like crazy (mint will easily overwhelm a patch), unless ...

The only time we planted catnip outside, two things happened within minutes. Redcliff lay down on top of it and rolled around in utter bliss, and then every cat in the neighbourhood showed up. Cliffie spent the next couple of hours driving off one neighbour cat after another, and in between face-offs going back to roll on/chew at the catnip plant. By end of day, we had end of plant.

I sometimes keep a potted catnip plant in the kitchen, but I keep it high up and I dole out the leaves sparingly. Never give nip to a kitten.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on February 05, 2007, 08:12:19 AM
Probably not a good idea to grow it, then? On the other hand, there are no cats nearby. It looks like a beautiful shrub.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on February 05, 2007, 08:23:07 AM
It's more a groundcover than a shrub, Boom Boom.

It is pretty and fragrant, as mint is -- very intense green. And it is tough; it should thrive and spread as long as you don't have too many neighbouring substance abusers.   :wink:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on February 05, 2007, 09:30:00 AM
Quote from: skdadl
...it should thrive and spread as long as you don't have too many neighbouring substance abusers.   :wink:


 :lol:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on February 09, 2007, 02:55:44 PM
Whew. I was able to find more bags of potting mix at the local store - I was afraid I'd be stuck with seeds I can't start indoors. I should be finished my plotting pants by this weekend to transplant in the spring.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on March 10, 2007, 01:23:46 PM
Oh, dear, have I ever ordered a huge bunch of stuff! That garden porn catalogue (Veseys) is irresistable. I now have seeds or seedlings of potatoes, several varieties of lettuce, corn, beans, tomatoes, strawberries, pumpkin, watermelon, flowers, herbs (including catnip for the neighborhood substance abusers...), and spices, not to mention some trees, hedges, and shrubs coming my way soon. This property is going to be gorgeous when I'm done with it (which will be never...).  :garden
Title: Garden planning
Post by: deBeauxOs on March 10, 2007, 01:37:41 PM
Wow ... all that gardening should keep you out of trouble!   :P

By the way, you may want to consider where to plant that catnip, unless you want all the kitties living on the lower North Shore rolling around your property in a state of druggy bliss.  

(http://www.lafilleduperenoel.net/smilies/cat/animaux/animaux-lfdpn-140.gif)(http://www.lafilleduperenoel.net/smilies/cat/animaux/animaux-lfdpn-140.gif)(http://www.lafilleduperenoel.net/smilies/cat/animaux/animaux-lfdpn-140.gif)
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on March 10, 2007, 01:47:09 PM
:rotfl:

Och, those are gorgeous, deBeauxOs. Debra! We need those.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on March 10, 2007, 01:53:25 PM
I don't grow the nip on my own property; I know his haunts cuz I follow him and have always grown it somewhere along his 'routine'. I've even been known to plant some in city parks when I lived in TO.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on March 10, 2007, 02:02:32 PM
testing ...

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v673/skdadl/animaux-lfdpn-140.gif)
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Croghan27 on March 10, 2007, 02:12:03 PM
Quote from: skdadl
testing ...

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v673/skdadl/animaux-lfdpn-140.gif)


All you white cats got rhythm?
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on March 10, 2007, 02:21:55 PM
:lol:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: brebis noire on March 10, 2007, 02:35:36 PM
They're white and nerdy.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xEzGIuY7kw (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xEzGIuY7kw)
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on March 10, 2007, 02:48:10 PM
:rotfl:

Well, at least I don't wear pyjamas.

Och, brebis noire -- that made me feel five years younger, at least.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on March 10, 2007, 03:00:42 PM
Quote from: deBeauxOs
Wow ... all that gardening should keep you out of trouble!   :P
  Nah.  :spy:


Quote from: deBeauxOs
By the way, you may want to consider where to plant that catnip, unless you want all the kitties living on the lower North Shore rolling around your property in a state of druggy bliss.  


The nip will be at the beginning of my property, to keep the cats away from the bird sanctuary at the other end. I'm putting a fence around the yard to keep the dogs out - they shit all over the place. The catnip will be outside the fence.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: k'in on March 11, 2007, 07:28:52 PM
The best thing ever is garden clogs:

(http://www.sloggers.com/images/sloggers/197_clog_thm.jpg)

Can slip them on whilst standing up and you can't hurt 'em.  If they get dirty, just hose 'em down.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: lagatta on March 11, 2007, 07:32:25 PM
Yeah, love those, keep them by my back door. However, some gardeners do need real wellies.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on March 11, 2007, 07:46:45 PM
Plain old rubber boots suffice for me.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on March 11, 2007, 07:49:35 PM
I'm a boot person, too. I got some really simple dark green ones yesterday. I'll wear them in the garden, yes, but I'm going to wear them to and from the office for the next little while until the streets are cleaner. (I'll change into my usual pumps when I get to my desk of course.) I have crocs as a gift but I'm not a big fan. They feel weird to me.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: lagatta on March 11, 2007, 08:49:51 PM
Wellies are rubber boots (usually the high kind) - they are also called gumboots in the Southern Hemisphere, and of course the gumboot stomp dances of South African miners are famous: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wellington_boot (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wellington_boot)
Title: Garden planning
Post by: justme on March 22, 2007, 09:28:50 AM
Got my special seeds from the Vancouver Seed Bank yesterday!

 :happydance2:

Couldn't wait - popped half my order into water to germinate.  I have a little set of plant shelves set up in the spare room and have jerry-rigged grow-lites to hang from the top.  I have a great seed starter thingy from Lee Valley - a self-watering unit so the babies won't dry out (been there done that  :oops: )

It's kinda early, but hopefully it will be warm enough by May to transplant them outside.  I have some cool 'hats' to protect them outside (also from Lee Valley - yes, I am an addict).

I'll wait awhile before I start the rest of the seeds, just in case we have a late spring.  Plus the longer I wait to plant them the more of the seeds will be female plants.

Speaking of . . . has anyone heard anything about the extradition trial for Marc Emery?
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on March 22, 2007, 09:38:15 AM
justme, what kinds of seeds did you get?

Damn -- I wish I had some nasturtiums going -- I love the nasties, and the sooner they can be draping over things, the better.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: justme on March 22, 2007, 09:38:26 AM
just chasing that dancing snoopy off the TAT - annoying, no?
Title: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on March 22, 2007, 10:25:05 AM
Quote from: justme
I have a great seed starter thingy from Lee Valley - a self-watering unit so the babies won't dry out (been there done that  :oops: )


I have my tomatoes in one of those, too. My favourite gardening site gave it a bad review (they say the cells are too small, the roots grow into the water mat meaning you break them when transplanting, not enough soil means purplish leaves due to insufficient potassium) but I doubt I'd be able to get 24 tomato plants started in my house any otherway.

justme - where will you keep your special plants? (I know Leopold wants to get into that sort of gardening but I don't think we can. At least not while we're renovating and have workers coming into the house all the time.)
Title: Garden planning
Post by: justme on March 22, 2007, 10:56:05 AM
Quote from: skdadl
justme, what kinds of seeds did you get?

Damn -- I wish I had some nasturtiums going -- I love the nasties, and the sooner they can be draping over things, the better.


happy smoke seeds - which by the by are legal to buy in Canada! :wink:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: justme on March 22, 2007, 11:03:05 AM
Quote from: kuri
justme - where will you keep your special plants? (I know Leopold wants to get into that sort of gardening but I don't think we can. At least not while we're renovating and have workers coming into the house all the time.)


I'll start them inside this year, in the spare room, then plant them outside once its warm enough.  I have some "guerilla gardens" in the woods on our property.  Too risky in my books to grow indoors - gotta buy all the fancy lights and stuff too.  Remember this is a weed, and will grow darn-near anywhere!  I had a couple in my flower gardens last year and the year before and nobody noticed them there 8)  Come fall I cut them down and hang in the attic to dry.

The only time I get sweaty is when the helicopters start their patterns in the fall - I count on my small patches not being worth the effort to bust me :wink:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on March 22, 2007, 11:11:03 AM
Nasturtiums will grow like weeds even if you plant on the stupido-traditional May 24th weekend, which with climate change is no longer applicable.

I have planted them in June and they are hanging over in no time.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: k'in on March 22, 2007, 02:34:16 PM
Anybody know how to get a lilac to bloom?  I planted one 3 years ago (French hybrid) & it had pretty, scented flowers.  I love to sit out back with my tea & watch the birds and squirrels.  The lilac blooms really added to the ambiance.  It looks healthy and has grown a lot but no blooms the past two years.  Any tips?
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on March 22, 2007, 02:39:03 PM
Hmmn. Did you clean off the blossoms that first year when they were finished, k'in? You don't always have to do that (I speak as a lucky person who didn't but got them returning anyway), but that might be part of the problem.

Maybe google for a site that talks about pruning lilacs. That would be my guess, that pruning helps. I can't think that they need foreign pollination, which would be my only other thought.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: k'in on March 22, 2007, 02:54:58 PM
I did prune the first year but not last year.  I've fed & not fed.  The advice I get is conflicting.  I'm not sure if I'm being too nice or not nice enough to it.  There's a lilac a couple of yards over that is magnificient & I get tons of bees.  Odd, I can grow so-called tough plants like roses easily but no luck with nasturtiums and the mint I planted didn't become invasive which i understand means it isn't successful.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on March 22, 2007, 03:33:32 PM
It may be that the different hybrids have different rules, k'in. I haven't had lilac troubles but I've had other hybrid tree troubles, and I was able to learn a lot on the innertubes. Even so, I finally had to get an arborist to come look and advise. It may have something to do with your soil, eg -- it may be something that simple. The fertilizer you used might be just the thing your soil doesn't need, but I don't know how to do those analyses. Just knowing what your tree wants might give you the hint.

ETA: It may be, though, that the tree just wanted a rest. You're coming up on your next experiment pretty soon -- maybe you'll get a surprise. Do you see flower bracts right now?
Title: Garden planning
Post by: k'in on March 23, 2007, 11:05:18 AM
Well, there's stuff about to pop on it but not sure if there is more than just leaves.  I will monitor and if it remains sans flowers will inquire at the local garden store where I got it.  They are very helpful, except I seem to have bizarro gardening problems that others don't.  

On the bright side, one of the tree hating neighbours (diagonal) have their house listed for sale.  She hates the birch tree, claiming it will become hazardous during a tornado!.  It doesn't hang over the fence line at all.  The real reason I know is that it provides shade, which she hates.  In the spirit of benevolence, I did get the tree guy to prune it back this winter.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on March 23, 2007, 11:21:56 AM
I love birch trees, and that was what I had ... for a couple of seasons. And then last year she died ...  :(

If you have a healthy birch, I envy you so much. They are very difficult to get going, although I know that once they're strong, they can live forever and get huge.

I don't dare try a birch again. I have a friend who will advise on a safer tree for me. Sigh. I'm still sad about that birch -- the corpus delicious is still out there, requiring extraction pretty soon, I guess.  :(
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on March 23, 2007, 11:24:09 AM
I shall go into the bush this summer and find a birch just starting to grow, and transplant it on my land. I, too, love birch. I have some tiny red maples coming from Veseys.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on April 02, 2007, 02:55:56 PM
Hey! Remember the upside-down growing device that I got for tomatoes last year, but then neglected to keep up as I should have done?

Up top, after you hang the tomatoes through the li'l holes, you fill in the top with dirt and plant herbs, which grow upright as the tomatoes grow upside-down. Now, because I stopped watering through the drought, all the herbs I'd planted in that compartment died, along with the tomatoes. Or at least I thought they had.

But guess what? I go out to visit, knowing that I'll have to dump that thing in order to replant tomatoes in a while, and guess what is growing away happily in that shallow compartment?

The chives! The chives are there, chiving away. Persistent li'l buggers, the chives. Nice flowers, too, and edible, crunchy edible.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: steffie on April 13, 2007, 08:04:44 AM
That device sounds wonderful!  Where did you get it?  

I'm not sure that my debut into gardening should include tomatoes.  They're for the pros.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: brebis noire on April 13, 2007, 08:23:02 AM
Quote
 I'm not sure that my debut into gardening should include tomatoes.  They're for the pros.


Oh steffie - tomatoes are the easiest, especially if you buy the plants (as opposed to starting them from seed.) I've had great yields over the past few years, even when other vegs have been so-so. All I've done is mulch them with straw (because I have lots of straw - you could use other organic material.)

I don't think there are vegs for pros versus beginners. It all depends on climate and soil conditions, and the available seed varieties.

I have had some of the best results from just plopping seeds into the ground and weeding when necessary. It's the soil and the weather that do the real work.

Right now, my garden is covered by at least a foot of snow, so naturally I'm starting to become obsessed with planting.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on April 13, 2007, 08:31:55 AM
Planting Zones Map: http://nlwis-snite1.agr.gc.ca/plant00/index.phtml (http://nlwis-snite1.agr.gc.ca/plant00/index.phtml)
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on April 13, 2007, 08:37:52 AM
I'm ordering one of these: Tomato greenhouse at CTC (http://www.canadiantire.ca/browse/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id=845524443250265&FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=1408474396672632&bmUID=1176467719028)
Title: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on April 13, 2007, 08:47:55 AM
Thanks for posting that map, boom boom! I'm a 3? (Actually I'm in a 3A zone - I don't know what the A stands for.) I always thought I was in a 2 (my parents are in 1 and my mom is always lamenting the plants she cannot grow in Zone 1).

I have much more choice than I thought...
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on April 13, 2007, 08:55:33 AM
Quote from: kuri
Thanks for posting that map, boom boom!

No problem.


Quote from: kuri
I'm a 3? (Actually I'm in a 3A zone - I don't know what the A stands for.)


I'm also in 3A, and I also don't know what the A stands for.  :oops:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: brebis noire on April 13, 2007, 08:58:29 AM
Quote
I'm also in 3A, and I also don't know what the A stands for.  :oops:


It's like cup size - it's all relative, but what is important is a good individual fit.   :P  

I'm a 4a or 4b, but I'm not sure what that means in terms of what will grow and what won't. I just rely on my local greenhouse/gardening center, which I figure does their research and offers what is appropriate for the region.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on April 13, 2007, 09:00:36 AM
*snerk*

Great minds, brebis noire. As I was reading along, I started to think of bras too.  :D
Title: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on April 13, 2007, 09:01:47 AM
If we're talking bras, I'd *love* to be an A. I'd spend far less money and be far more comfortable.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on April 13, 2007, 09:09:32 AM
I've found this useful when considering what to buy for my planting zone:
Veseys Products by Planting Zone (http://www.veseys.com/ca/en/gardeninfo/reference/hardinesszones)
Title: Garden planning
Post by: steffie on April 23, 2007, 07:57:37 AM
OK - my zone is 4A.  What does that mean?  I went to the site that displays products by zone, and I'm equally confused.  This much I know:  I bought seeds for Morning Glory and Sweet Peas.  I plan to start them inside and transfer them to a sunny location (morning sun) under a plastic chicken wire trellis (yet to be erected.)  Any suggestions?
Title: Garden planning
Post by: lagatta on April 23, 2007, 08:17:05 AM
As for zones, we are a 5, but I suspect that we are a microclimate and have many more internal microclimates, as an island, depending on the wind and snow cover:

Quote
Another problem is that the hardiness zones do not take into account the reliability of the snow cover. Snow acts like an insulator against extreme cold temperatures, protecting the root system of hibernating plants. If the snow cover is reliable (then present during the coldest days), the actual temperature to which the roots are exposed is not as low as the hardiness zone number would indicate. As an example, Quebec City in Canada is located in zone 4 but can rely on an important snow cover every year, making it possible to cultivate plants normally rated for zones 5 or 6, whereas in Montreal, located in zone 5, it is sometimes difficult to cultivate plants adapted to the zone because of the unreliable snow cover.
From Wikipedia article.

Verseys pegs us as a 5b, but as you can see we are a small enclave within colder zones:

http://www.veseys.com/ca/en/gardeninfo/ ... ernontario (http://www.veseys.com/ca/en/gardeninfo/reference/hardinesszones/easternontario)
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 02, 2007, 03:44:20 PM
I've started turning the soil over for planting.  I should get my trees and shrubs this week in the mail. They'll be planted first, then the sunflowers, then everything else. Part of the ground is still frozen, and I have to work
around that part.

Good to work in the dirt!  :Garden1
Title: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on May 02, 2007, 05:23:31 PM
How are you working your soil, BoomBoom? By hand or with a rototiller? I'm still not sure what I'm going to do to remove my sod and get some good dirt worked in...
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on May 02, 2007, 06:37:57 PM
Today would have been a perfect day for me to go out and do clean-up, but instead I was stuck inside with ... never mind.

Tomorrow I must go out and attack the dead weeds while it is still so easy to see where the problems are. Can't make it to a garden centre tomorrow, but maybe Friday. It's maybe a touch early to get the wee toms, but there are things we could seed now -- nasties and morning glories, eg -- and all the ground covers and herbs should be arriving. Have to think of what I need besides, always, basil, basil, and more basil! One can never have too much basil!
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 02, 2007, 06:49:29 PM
Quote from: kuri
How are you working your soil, BoomBoom? By hand or with a rototiller? I'm still not sure what I'm going to do to remove my sod and get some good dirt worked in...


Shovel. I have a lot of sod to lift, been at it three hours today. Tomorrow morning I have to go out and shake loose all that good soil attached to the sod. A friend has a rototiller, but I think I'll use the shovel and good old fashion muscle to turn all the soil over.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 02, 2007, 06:52:56 PM
Quote from: skdadl
 ...One can never have too much basil!


This guy?

(http://www.wilsonsalmanac.com/images2/cleese.jpg)
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on May 02, 2007, 06:54:38 PM
A fawlty conclusion, Boom Boom.   :wink:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 02, 2007, 07:19:07 PM
(http://www.needcoffee.com/html/dvd/images/ftowers1.jpg)
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on May 02, 2007, 07:20:08 PM
Don't mention the war!
Title: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on May 02, 2007, 07:44:04 PM
Quote from: Boom Boom
Shovel.


Y'see, I had the same thought originally. And then my mom thought that it was too much work and would "put me off gardening forever". I dunno: I realize it's work, but I don't want to rent a rototiller if I don't have to. It's going to be a big hassle getting that to the house and back in a Tercel....
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 02, 2007, 08:57:12 PM
Quote from: kuri
 Y'see, I had the same thought originally. And then my mom thought that it was too much work and would "put me off gardening forever". I dunno: I realize it's work, but I don't want to rent a rototiller if I don't have to. It's going to be a big hassle getting that to the house and back in a Tercel....


I suggest using the shovel to turn the soil, but just do a bit at a time. I did two hours this afternoon, one hour this evening. That's about my limit. At this rate, it'll take me more than a week, but that's okay, I'm retired. You'll need fertilizer, too, by the way.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on May 02, 2007, 09:06:42 PM
What kind of fertilizer are you using to start? I am planning on replacing some of the soil - the previous tenants of this house used to repair/soup up cars in the backyard, so I think I should try to make sure there isn't too much auto stuff getting into my edibles, so I think that should improves things. And I'm building a three-compartment composter - but that won't produce anything for awhile.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: brebis noire on May 02, 2007, 09:58:23 PM
I usually turn over the soil in my garden - I like the results better than with a rototiller, and my garden is very big, about 12' by 30'. I don't even think I could manipulate a rototiller myself, not for very long anyways. It was an easier job by hand, and I don't think it took that much longer.

If you don't have ready compost, some composted manure would be best. I hate it when it comes in plastic sacs, but maybe you can get a load delivered.

I can't wait to get out there and start, but May is already looking very busy, work-wise. I guess I should be happy about that, but it sure cuts into my life.  :?
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 02, 2007, 10:18:08 PM
Quote from: kuri
What kind of fertilizer are you using to start? I am planning on replacing some of the soil - the previous tenants of this house used to repair/soup up cars in the backyard, so I think I should try to make sure there isn't too much auto stuff getting into my edibles, so I think that should improves things. And I'm building a three-compartment composter - but that won't produce anything for awhile.


I don't have the catalogue handy, but I'm ordering from Home Hardware in Labrador, the nearest gardening shipper to me. It comes in big plastic tubs.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: k'in on May 03, 2007, 11:46:33 AM
I'm an avid user of the garden claw and find it does a good all-purpose job in the garden for mixing in compost, digging out weeds, etc.

However, one of the most grueling things I ever did was to dig up a not too large area of sod manually.  Plus I had a helper.  If I ever had to do that again I would definitely rent a tiller unless I was going to spread the job out over a number of days.  

Pruned the blackberry bushes and roses and planted some peas.  I'm thinking I might like to get a peony this year but I'm not sure.  Can't wait to plant/pick herbs.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 03, 2007, 12:27:57 PM
Still very cool here, all my planting is indoors. At least until the couple of trees and shrubs I've ordered come - they can be planted (outside) in cool weather. I was out shaking the soil off the sod I dug up yesterday -  I want to keep as much good soil as possible - and it's a time consuming job.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on May 05, 2007, 08:15:00 PM
Oh my frickin' back! So after talking to the deck contracters to get our second quote, we looked into renting a rototiller. But only the gigantorz one (which would require also renting a truck to bring it to our place) would go through sod. So, OK, we decided to just take out the sod by hand and then see how much was left. Well, guess what's underneath the sod? Gravel and clay. Would probably destroy a rototiller. So, I keep digging and see how far I can get while L. is working on building up more grading around the house with the dirt and sod I dug out. (Because, you know all that rain we just got? It's in our basement. Can't figure out from where, probably from the one room in the basement that the previous owners didn't tear out, giving us another job for the summer.) So now I have 1 square metre of clay and gravel dug out to a depth of 1 foot - 1 more to go. I'd considered doing 3 but now, no way, not this year. 2 square metres will be plenty!

Still have to bring our pots of tomatoes back in for the night, and then, Kuri is heading to the pool to do only the most perfuctory of swimming and then float in the hot tub for a good, long time.

Not sure if I should dig the other square first or put in the topsoil and bullshit we bought in first. I'm thinking it might be good to get all the digging out of the way first...
Title: Garden planning
Post by: on May 05, 2007, 08:19:50 PM
Gosh geez, what an awful lot of work. This is our second summer in our first house. Last summer, we spent some time fixing up some stuff. I was really hoping to start on the garden and landscape our backyard this summer, but I'm not up for it. Maybe in July, but I don't know if July is too late to start gardening. I really don't know the first thing about gardening. Maybe next year, kuri, I'll be going through what you're going through.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: lagatta on May 05, 2007, 08:26:14 PM
Wondering if I should put the geraniums (actually pelargoniums) out on the balconies yet. I'm on the top floor of a triplex and there is a lot of wind, especially in front, as there is a (rather interesting) old Bell Canada switchboard station across the street - though not exactly opposite my flat, which faces a wee duplex so I have a lot of sun.

I was so happy to be able to save most of them.

We have to dig up a couple of feet of earth in the front - we did most of it last year, and planted perennials, but have a wee yard remaining to do. Problem is, I really can't kneel, so I hope I can help in some way. Hope I get over this "reduced mobility"!
Title: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on May 05, 2007, 08:35:57 PM
Don't try this while you're prego, Eph. My back could barely stand it as is. Of course, I think you're probably in better shape than me in general, but still it's very hard to ergonomic when digging.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 05, 2007, 08:40:41 PM
My order did not come in from Veseys this week, I hope there isn't a problem with getting the stuff through the surface mail to here. Mail is trucked in as far as Natashquan, then has to be shipped via airmail. I'm going to Blanc Sablon Monday and Tuesday, so everything will have to sit at the Post Office (if it gets delivered here) until get back Wednesday. I've decided to get my friend with the rototiller to dig up the garden, because doing it by shovel doesn't turn the soil fine enough.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on May 05, 2007, 08:50:28 PM
Well dam I completely forgot about urban squirrels and for lan sakes there are possums walking down the street. I did not know I was in possum territory, but seems I am. Anyway I planted all my nasts, cosmos seeds and they all be eaten now. So now I have no choice but to seed to germination and then plant. Bloody hell! Every cat in the nabe has found the catnip out by utility shed, I know I am a moonbat in the first place for even planting it, it also be destroyed.  :cry:

Wind chimes go up tomorow.  :D
Title: Garden planning
Post by: fern hill on May 05, 2007, 08:53:34 PM
Possums?
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 05, 2007, 09:48:34 PM
Quote from: Toedancer
Every cat in the nabe has found the catnip out by utility shed, I know I am a moonbat in the first place for even planting it, it also be destroyed.  :cry:


Not many cats here, maybe four in the entire community. I'm planting lots of catnip.

Drat - power is dimming - looks like power is about to go off. Should be fixed by tomorrow.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: lagatta on May 05, 2007, 09:54:21 PM
How odd. Is Kegaska anti-cat? :cat There are considerably more cats in my co-op, which numbers only 15 human households.

Sorry, I'd misspelt Kegaska: http://www.tourismebassecotenord.com/villages.asp (http://www.tourismebassecotenord.com/villages.asp)

Origin of its name: http://www.tourismlowernorthshore.com/kegaska.asp (http://www.tourismlowernorthshore.com/kegaska.asp)
Quote
The village of Kegaska is located at the western entrance of the Lower North Shore, about 60 kilometres (37 miles) past the end of the road in Natashquan. Kegaska was built along the shore of two bays and an island connected by bridge. The name Kegaska comes from the Innu word quegasca. This may refer to the shortcut and easy passage at high tide between the mainland and the islands.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 05, 2007, 10:02:49 PM
Quote from: lagatta
How odd. Is Kegesa anti-cat? :cat There are considerably more cats in my co-op, which numbers only 15 human households.


I don't know - I think it's just a case of Kegaska being overrun with dogs. Also, no local pet shop or animal shelter, which means going to Sept-Iles for a pet, and also no local veterinarian. I doubt many on the coast have ever really found the usefulness of cats, while many hunt with their dogs.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on May 06, 2007, 07:49:38 AM
Possums?

You sure those aren't racoons, Toe? We are definitely 'coon country over here.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 15, 2007, 07:41:31 PM
I managed to take most of the sod off my new garden area today - hard work as the sod is heavy. But I'm going to have a great garden area behind the house this summer! Wish it would warm up a bit. I should have some nice tulips in a few weeks, as they're shooting up through the soil now. I have a lot of seeds and seedlings ready to plant, but the danger of frost is still with us. I have a small greenhouse coming in about a week.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: justme on May 16, 2007, 09:24:08 AM
Boom boom, in the event that you expand your garden in the future -

If you are tackling the removal of sod, the previous fall (or earlier) cover area with cardboard and black garbage bags (or other dark plastic).  This will kill the grass in good order and make it much easier to lift the sod.  I would cut the dead sod and turn it over upside down and cover it back up, and the next spring it is so easy to remove . . .

I am so jealous of your greenhouse, enjoy!
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 16, 2007, 10:41:53 AM
Thanks for the tip.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 16, 2007, 03:25:55 PM
I'm still waiting to do some outdoor planting, but I'm worried about the cold. What constant temperatures do I need to look at for planting seeds and seedlings? I don't mind waiting until June, except Veseys sent me sone seedlings which need to go into the ground.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: deBeauxOs on May 16, 2007, 05:33:07 PM
Quote from: Boom Boom
I'm still waiting to do some outdoor planting, but I'm worried about the cold. What constant temperatures do I need to look at for planting seeds and seedlings? I don't mind waiting until June, except Veseys sent me sone seedlings which need to go into the ground.

Are they rootbound? If you don't have bigger fibre pots for transplanting them, Boom Boom, here's what to do in a pinch, so that they thrive until you plant them in your garden.  

Do you have lots of empty plastic containers, for yoghurt  or margarine?  Get a bunch of them and line them with a doubled sheet of newsprint.  Fill with a mixture of potting soil and a bit of that black muck in each.  Carefully set a seedling in each pot.  Put them outside each day in a sunny, wind-protected spot.  Bring them in at night to protect from frost.  When all danger of frost is over, move them to their spots in their garden by letting them dry out for a day or so without watering, lift from plastic containers, poke a few holes in the newsprint, and place in their garden hole.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 16, 2007, 08:36:40 PM
Good tip, luv, I'll give it a try.  :D
Title: Garden planning
Post by: alisea on May 16, 2007, 10:49:53 PM
The lower end temperature is the critical one. If you're still going below freezing at night you can't put in tomatoes, eggplants, all the tender ones.

A couple of things people used to do on St-Pierre et Miquelon (and probably still do, though I haven't been there for years!):

-- Cut the ends off large plastic jugs -- like bleach jugs, 2 litre pop containers, or motor oil ones, cleaned of course - and stick them in the ground so that the plant is encircled. Blocks the wind, and if clear, has a bit of a mini-greenhouse effect.

-- Plant the tender ones up against a south facing wall, so sheltered from the north, and in a sun trap

-- Use a glass bottle or clear plastic one actually over the plant, with the cap off for air circulation (called a 'cloche') -- lots of pix here: http://tinyurl.com/ys3krd (http://tinyurl.com/ys3krd)

I went over to PEI to open up my parents' cabin and get Mum's garden started last Victoria Day weekend and it was horrible, bitterly cold weather -- I remember it was only 1C on Sunday morning. Despite that, I wanted to put in Mum's tomatoes, as I knew I wouldn't be able to get over again for a while. So although the Nice Lady (tm) at the tomato plant place across the road from Vesey's told me I was nuts (in a very polite way), I forged ahead.

What I did was plant each of them inside a ring made from a tuna can open at both ends, sunk with just about 1/4" protruding above the ground (we have a cutworm/grub problem which is worse when it's damp and cold). Then I put a tomato cage over it, and covered that with a clear leaf bag, closed end on top, buried the edges and put a few stones on them to weight them down. I slit the bag in a few places so that some fresh air could circulate.

It worked like a charm. 11 of the 12 plants made it, 9 of them *really* vigourously, and my folks (and the rest of us!) had lots of ripe tomatoes starting in August.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on May 19, 2007, 06:28:45 PM
Gawd almighty but I wish I could grow veggies. I'm totally exhausted. I had no idea what a dump this place was in the garden. I saw it with snow everywhere.

My dofasco neighbours don't cut the grass cuz there isn't any. Their dog wrecks it and it's leash lets it almost reach my boundary of garden. I have worked my ass off laying in a front garden and two wee side gardens. From Seed No Less! But today at Can. Tire, I used up all Mike's funny munny and got annuals for a buck and perennials for two.

Oh yeah and I put in all I lifted from old garden in the way of lilies.

Last thing I did today was mowed the grass, plus the bare patches of neighbour.  I'm having a glass of plonk, then I'm gonna watch Queen. ha!
Title: Garden planning
Post by: lagatta on May 19, 2007, 06:53:08 PM
Queen? As in Her Majesty?

Toedancer, last year we dug up a couple of feet of "soil" from the front postage stamps, put in real soil and some beautiful perennials a co-op member was able to wheedle out of a lady in NDG in exchange for some kind of decorating services.

There is some shitty grass and a border of shrubs and trees in the wide but not deep back yard - no way it could be a garden, either for food or flowers.

And of course ijuts who let their dogs shit everywhere - needless to say I blame the humans, not the poor pooches.

Have a good glass of plonk. I'm doing the same, after translating all day, from very early this morning.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on May 19, 2007, 06:57:46 PM
Indeed idjits who let their dogs poo and don't clean up! Well I already have a wee reputation about THAT. Not tolerated and I shovel it OVER. Plus I shout at kids, whom I adore, don't stomp on SEEDS idjits!

Oh Lagatta I'm sorry, I just realized this isn't all about ME, you've worked your ass off as well, yes a glass of plonk helps.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: lagatta on May 19, 2007, 07:12:57 PM
Don't be sorry! Griping is good! :D
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 19, 2007, 08:26:42 PM
Darn. Could be two more weeks before I can do any planting outside. Here's the forecast: http://www.weatheroffice.gc.ca/city/pag ... ric_e.html (http://www.weatheroffice.gc.ca/city/pages/qc-125_metric_e.html)  Snow or Rain? What the heck - this is the month of May, not April.  :(
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on May 19, 2007, 11:23:11 PM
Oh Boom Boom that is positively dismal I must say. But cheer up, summer has to go east eventually.

To answer Fern and Skdadl way up there, indeed Possums. But not no more. My dog has sent them all scurrying to other under-porches, across the street to be exact.

They be so ugly too. The coons only come out night before garbage day, and entirely different, coons cute.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Berlynn on May 19, 2007, 11:46:26 PM
It froze here last night.  Fortunately, I had covered almost everything, including the fruit on the nanking cherry (don't ask!).  I noticed this a.m. that I'd forgotten to throw something over the morning glory but they seems to have withstood the shock.   :shock:

Frost on May long...  Hmph!  :x
Title: Garden planning
Post by: steffie on May 20, 2007, 10:46:32 AM
Still pretty cool here around lake Nipissing.  A friend told me that planting should not take place until the first full moon of June (which occurs this year June 1st).  Another friend clarified this, explaining that only after the first full moon does our side of the earth begin to tilt towards the sun.  As it is now, we are still "on the dark side".  (cue the Pink Floyd...) ;)

I splurged and bought some trailing nasturtiums, which will look gorgeous cascading out of my planters that rim the porch railing.  Happy!  They'll stay indoors at night until that first full moon, though.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 20, 2007, 01:09:35 PM
Me mudder kept several pots of African Violets going for probably 20 years. What other flower varieties can be kept indoors all year, with relatively little maintenance?  I have cactus plants but they don't flower much. I'd like to get an English Ivy plant, but that doesn't flower, either.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: deBeauxOs on May 20, 2007, 05:51:37 PM
Quote from: Boom Boom
... What other flower varieties can be kept indoors all year, with relatively little maintenance? ...
If it's low maintenance and gorgeous foliage, you might get some variegated leaf types of the philodendron family.  As for bloomers, how about some Xmas cactus?  Some types of begonias will also thrive, and bloom indoors.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on May 20, 2007, 06:17:57 PM
Pelargoniums, which are what most people know as geraniums, will keep blooming on and off indoors -- they have their down-times, but with a little care and pruning and fertilizing, they just never stop.

Kalanchoes, which are very easy to pick up around here, are also very persistent flowerers if you keep them pruned. They are succulents but they flower much more often than the cactii, and they are very pretty, although they can get sickly if overwatered.

Oxalis is a brilliant little rhizome that produces teensy pink flowers (very briefly) and then burgundy red shamrocky leaves that give the effect of blooms. I have two pots of oxalis -- I set them outside in the summer, which they love, and then bring them in to winter over. There is almost nothing you can do to kill them. After long drought, they will still come back when watered. Again, they die back during a down time, but they spring back.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 20, 2007, 07:10:18 PM
A friend was supposed to send some geranium cuttings, but must have forgot. I'll look into the best geranium varieties for here, and also oxalis, which I've never heard of. Thanks!  I wish I had the do-re-mi to make an opening in one wall and a really good size greenhouse to connect with that opening. I think I'll but a lottery tickey every month now - just a couple of bux. It's a tax on the stupid, fer shure, but I don't pay income tax. One of the benefits of being an ex-Mob guy in relocation.  :spy:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Holly Stick on May 20, 2007, 07:53:41 PM
I have oxalis, but it must be a different variety from skdadl's because the leaves are green on top and the flowers are white.  It's also called a shamrock plant.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Berlynn on May 20, 2007, 11:33:59 PM
A former neighbour had impatiens which she overwintered in her house.  I wonder if that might be a possibility.

You might want to also investigate the native plant society in your neck of the woods to see what the natural bloomers are.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on May 21, 2007, 06:49:16 AM
Yes, I think there are a number of kinds of oxalis. You can plant them in  your garden and I think some sometimes make it through the winter here, but that's not a sure thing, so I keep them portable in pots. Besides, it's nice to have them waving those shamrocks at you during the winter.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 21, 2007, 07:55:59 AM
It's snowing :snow: and it's 0 degrees C  :cold:  so no gardening here probably until June.  :(
Title: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on May 21, 2007, 08:10:28 AM
I put in my little garden plot yesterday, frost warnings me damned. I keep looking at the 5 day forecast and there's always a frost warning for several days ahead and then it goes away by time that day comes. I guess I'll just keep checking and if there's a frost on the same night I'm on, I'll throw down the plastic.

L. told me he took pictures of me gardening - I didn't even notice.

At the end I sprinkled some cayenne pepper over the whole garden plot - I was told that that was the best, organic way to prevent neighbourhood cats from treating your garden as a litter box.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Debra on May 21, 2007, 08:14:46 AM
I angered the shoulder gods by trenching around the gardens and pulling out grass clumps. And I haven't finished yet.

My peas and lettuce are up, strawberries are in flower, planted out tomatoes and dill seeds, the dill keeps the horn worm off the tomatoes.

The weeds OMG the weeds I one and three come to take it's place.

 :shock:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 21, 2007, 08:26:24 AM
I envy those who have their gardens in already. Just too freaky cold here. I can't recall ever seeing snow on the Victoria Day weekend anywhere on the Quebec coast. How about sending a little bit of that global warming our way, pretty please?  :oops:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: brebis noire on May 21, 2007, 08:32:30 AM
I haven't started yet out there - on the nice sunny days I've had a lot of urgent work, and when I want to get started it gets all rainy. Today looks like it might clear up, though it's cool. And the kids don't have school so I can't do whatever I want for as long as I want anyways...one of the kids is sick and I don't want to leave him in the house alone for very long.
 
Sometimes I wonder why I bother with the garden and flowers, a lot of the time it just feels like more work for nothing.  :?
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 21, 2007, 08:36:27 AM
If the weather ever permits, I'm putting in lots of garden a) for something to do (I'm retired) and b) because I'd like to enjoy some fruit and veggies that I grew myself.

I just fed the wee birdies, poor wee things all out in the cold and snow and everything. Everytime they see me coming with their feed, they fly around me, twittering. Except the bigger birds, they keep their distance until I'm gone.  :lol:

ETA: I don't understand why the bigger birds (ravens and crows) fear me, while the smaller ones (mourning doves, buntings, robins) don't fear me at all. The mourning doves will even sit on the feeder while I am filling it.

I wish we had a "bird" or "feeding the birds" smiley.  :D
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 21, 2007, 08:42:12 AM
Bird smileys, other than these, I mean: :flamingo:  :penguin1  :penguin  :duck
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Debra on May 21, 2007, 08:50:08 AM
video footage of Boom Boom :feedbirds:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on May 21, 2007, 08:50:57 AM
Debra, you think you have weeds? Check out this yard!

(http://farm1.static.flickr.com/191/507633675_7ef2fbab02.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/kurichina/507633675/)

We don't have a lawn - we have a dandelion field. And L. is trying to eliminate the dandelions by hand! I understand (and agree with) his desire not to use chemicals, but I think if we're going to be serious about it, we need to just raise the whole lawn, put in some beds and the re-sod the rest. Could fix the grading at the same time. But that's out of our price range when we're having the pipes replaced, getting a deck on the front lawn (which we will - yay - cover up a lot of lawn!) and remodeling the upstairs ourselves.

I am determined to keep the little weedies out of my little plot though. That's doable.

ETA: Oh, and what's cuter than bright, red knees, I ask y'all?  :lol: Those were a prezzie from my mom after I complained that my bad knee made push-ups difficult.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Debra on May 21, 2007, 09:15:26 AM
Yep our lawn looks pretty much like that.  :D

The last few tenants before us were druggies and not disposed to garden upkeep.

Before complete redo try this, I'm going to try it cause as a renter I'm not replacing the lawn.

PC(R) GREEN(R) 8-2-4 with Corn Gluten (9 KG) - Natural fertilizer
        made of corn gluten meal, bone meal and sulphate of potash. Perfectly
        suited for residential lawns, this natural fertilizer and chemical-
        free herbicide in one reduces the use of toxic lawn care products
        while inhibiting dandelion and crabgrass seed germination.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 21, 2007, 09:22:39 AM
I've been reading the gardening columns in several magazines and websites, and there is a movement towards ground cover other than grass - and this has been going on for quite a few years now. I think the weekend Globe or Star had a long article on this. I have a brown moss cover on one side of my yard, but I doubt it will stick around. I'm going to try a wild plant ground cover.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Croghan27 on May 21, 2007, 09:38:28 AM
After a decade long 'war on dandelions' (isn't everything a war these days?)  :shock: during the 80's,  I finally came to the conclusion that I was totally outclassed by my little yellow friends.  :D

That not being such an ecologically aware time I did use some mighty chemical allies, as well as purchasing all manner of specialized tool to remove their dastardly roots - to no avail  :(

I finally came to the conclusion that while I, as an individual, have an IQ - they, as a collective, have a collective IQ and they were just smarter than I was, (am).  :oops:

We eventually learned to live in a mutual state of toleration. (and are better plants/people for it).
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on May 21, 2007, 09:43:29 AM
Once when I gardened about 1 acre of flowers, cutting flowers and veggies, I used Debra's concoction which worked very well.

Now I just use full strength white vinegar. It can kill other plants/grasses so one must be super careful. I dredge the bastards right at the base with no seeping away to surround.

Of course right after a rain you can easily use your dandelion digger to uproot and the roots can be as long as 3 ".  And mow, lots of mowing before they flower.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: steffie on May 21, 2007, 09:43:47 AM
:hug  boom boom, to keep you warm until spring arrives for you.  :)
Title: Garden planning
Post by: brebis noire on May 21, 2007, 09:43:58 AM
I get at least 2 calls from the lawn people every year, and I always tell them "I don't have a lawn", which makes for a very short call.

Actually though, I have lots of grass outside, and I do the mowing thing even though I think it's stupid for too many reasons to list here. But as long as there's green or coloured stuff growing out there, I'm happy with it. I don't mind the weeds at all, and have found that the more I let them grow, they develop their own little ecosystems and it looks just fine. The more you obsess about dandelions and try to remove them, the worse it looks, IMHO.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on May 21, 2007, 09:45:59 AM
Good point brebis, for now at this place I am only killing/diggin up the immediately around the garden beds. As for the lawn meh, I just mow.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on May 21, 2007, 10:06:00 AM
Is plain white vinegar strong enough for the purpose? There's only one place I would use it, but I really need something. The front postage stamp is in a boxed-in raised plot that comes right up to the sidewalk. A gazillion weeds plus some lovely but irritating cosmos grow in the crack in between the box and the walk -- by mid-August, the cosmos are so tall they are blocking access and I have to use neighbour's walk. And yet that crack is so narrow that I can't get my dibbly digger in to remove things by their roots. Fast death by vinegar would be ideal, but do I really not need special vinegar?
Title: Garden planning
Post by: brebis noire on May 21, 2007, 10:15:50 AM
I was listening to the vaguely British gardening expert on CBC radio from Montreal talk about vinegar the other day - plain white is OK for the job, you don't need anything fancy or expensive. But he wasn't really enthusiastic about killing plants that aren't weeds (the caller wanted to kill some ground cover that he didn't want in his lawn) and he noted besides that the vinegar would remain in the soil, affecting pH - so you might end up with other kinds of weeds that like a low soil pH (the last part is my surmising, not what he said.)

What's wrong with cosmos? Couldn't you just cut them when they've bloomed and bring them inside? I've tried planting cosmos but don't usually have much success...

Blue sky and sunny out there - but still only a bit above 10 C. I'm not a cool weather gardener.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 21, 2007, 10:16:28 AM
Quote from: steffie
:hug  boom boom, to keep you warm until spring arrives for you.  :)


Thanks. One of the wags down on the dock yesterday, when I asked him when to start planting outdoors (he's a fisherman, and also an excellent gardener) said, "in July - maybe".  :(
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on May 21, 2007, 10:22:02 AM
If you don't want cosmos in the cracks, just pull them out by the roots. You can dampen to make job easier. Yes plain white vinegar right at base, enuf to go to depth of roots will kill the buggers (dandelions), in fact it's perfect for cracks. I don't use vinegar too close to garden area, I dampen and dig out.

Oh just to add, I use a wee funnel to pour V from water can straight into base on lawn and cracks.

I like cosmos mixed with the tall grasses for privacy, but can't do that here.
Title: gardens
Post by: faith on May 21, 2007, 11:26:18 AM
I feel kind of guilty commenting on gardens as I live in such a mild climate for gardening that it almost seems you spend more time trying to control the super fast growth of plants than you do trying to urge them to life.

All my garden veggie plants are in- 3 different kinds of tomato, I looked for golden tomatoes which I grew last year but couldn't find them and the seeds I tried didn't germinate, so it will be a red crop this year. 2 different kinds of cucumber, buttenut squash, ufo zucchini, jalapeno peppers, 3 different kinds of lettuce, garlic that was planted last fall, green onions, peas and some Japanese eggplant. We have a raised bed and at the sides of it I layed in some cheap patio blocks and put some large planters on top of them next to the garden with rosemary, basil, applemint and sage in the pots.

I have some flowers to go in but I'm waiting for some sunny weather- right now it's rainy and dreary- good weather for lettuce.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Berlynn on May 21, 2007, 11:56:19 AM
Quote from: kuri
At the end I sprinkled some cayenne pepper over the whole garden plot - I was told that that was the best, organic way to prevent neighbourhood cats from treating your garden as a litter box.


kuri, thank you for this!  This morning, when I woke and looked out the window, the neighbour's cat was sitting right in the middle of my vegetable patch, pretty much right on top of where the Black Valentine beans are planted.  This afternoon, I will treat the garden with cayenne pepper!

And I'm a vinegar user, too.  We have a brick patio and dandelions love to come up through the cracks, so I squirt them with vinaigrette.  I dilute the vinegar with water because I worry about the plants around the bricks.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on May 21, 2007, 12:01:09 PM
Thanks, Debra! L. is going to Superstore tomorrow, and we're adding that to the list.

I've had a fantasy for awhile of replacing our lawn with catnip entirely.  :D

My mom, however, sent me this link (http://www.wildflowerfarm.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=1&Category_Code=G). If we had time to redo the entire thing - this is what I think we'd do.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: deBeauxOs on May 21, 2007, 01:04:21 PM
There's a paver-brick walk leading up to the front of my house.  Persistent plants, especially crab-grass and dandelions, keep growing in the cracks.  Every once in a while I pour boiling hot water over the sprouts.  It gets rid of them, until the next batch of seeds shows up.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Holly Stick on May 21, 2007, 01:17:37 PM
It's raining steadily here, with a bit of wet snow now.  The temperature is predicted to go down to 2 or 0 some nights this week.  I've already planted the wave petunias in the hanging baskets; the geraniums and bedding-out plants are still in their little containers.  So do I put them in the garage or the basement, or leave them out to toughen up or die?  I could move the hanging baskets as well.  The area is sheltered by trees, etc., and I am inclined to leave everything out to take its chances.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 21, 2007, 01:43:14 PM
Just had a look at the forecast - supposed to go as high as 13C on Wednesday and down to -2C overnight, but Thursday high 16C/low 7C, Friday high12C/low7C. Maybe I'll start planting on Saturday if it's another day of temps in the teens. I can't keep on waiting with live plants in my basement.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: k'in on May 21, 2007, 07:05:42 PM
Here's the City of Toronto site about xeriscaping. (http://www.toronto.ca/watereff/tips/xeriscaping.htm)

I've incorporated a lot of their suggestions but alas, the enforcers of the partriarchy and property standards have worn me down to the point that the front sports a reasonable facsimile of grass.  I would love to dig it out and plant low maintenance shrubs but digging up sod by hand is gruelling.

I use a spray bottle with a mixture of plain vinegar & salt to go after weeds that pop up in cracks.  Boiling water works too.

I had the walkway graced with cosmos too until the front walk/driveway got replaced two years ago.  I liked them as they were zero maintenance.  Ive tried sowing cosmos in the back & they just won't grow.  I admire their survival skills I guess.  A seed lays in a crevice, subjected to winter's harshness/salt, get totally ignored during summer drought yet they thrive.  

Dandelions-I know that lawn kuri!  I actually built my sun deck away from the back of the house to cover the maximum number of dandelions.  I eventually dug them out by hand, a few at a time, no pesticides, and have only noticed a couple of them this year.  The local garden centre gave me an after the fact tip that when they were in flower, to pull off the flowers to keep them from going to seed.  They also said the rule of thumb whether to replace the whole lawn is if the weeds are more than 50% of the lawn then it makes sense to do it.  If weeds are less than 50% you have a chance to win the war of attrition.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: steffie on May 22, 2007, 09:43:13 AM
Quote
Dandelions - ... I eventually dug them out by hand, a few at a time, no pesticides...


This is what I have been doing this weekend.  I filled the blue box, twice!  Pulling weeds in between mixing soil and installing bedding plants in window boxes.  They're good because I can bring them in if we have an unexpected snowstorm, a scenario which is not entirely unlikely 'round these parts.  

 :snow:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Debra on May 22, 2007, 09:51:04 AM
I think it's only fair we recognize what a wonderful plant the dandelion really is, even if we don't want it in our lawn.

http://www.mysticnaturals.com/articles/dandelion.htm (http://www.mysticnaturals.com/articles/dandelion.htm)
Quote
One of our most invasive garden weeds is the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale). The common name is derived from the French "dent de lion" or lion's teeth, because of the shape of its spiked leaves. As we all have have noticed, the dandelion is one of the first flowers to bloom in the spring and also lasts the longest into the fall season. Because of this long season, dandelions are an important source of food for the bees and honey dandelionproduction. The physical structure of the plant is interesting. Dandelion has a long central root (tap root) with its leaves arranged to catch water and direct it downwards to the root. Medicinal plants that have a long root system have the ability to pull valuable minerals and nutrients out of the soil and into the plant itself. The bright yellow of the flowers attract bees and just under the flower head are leaf-like petals (bracts) that help deter ants and other bugs from damaging the flower or acquiring the pollen and nectar. It's also amazing to note that as wide-spread as dandelion is, the plant is not native to North America.

The first mention of the medicinal qualities of dandelion date back to Arabian physicians of the tenth and eleventh century. The genus name, Taraxacum, is derived from the Greek taraxos (disorder) and akos (remedy) due to the plant's recognized healing actions. The species name, officinale, means, "used in the office or the workshop." Both the roots and leaves are used medicinally.

Dandelion is most commonly used as a diuretic (increases the flow of urine), hence its English nickname of "pissabeds". Medicinal plants contain a balance of properties and constituents whereas pharmaceuticals provide just the required chemicals to create the desired effect (and in many cases, side-effects). Pharmaceutical diuretics deplete the body of necessary minerals and nutrients, especially potassium. The dandelion plant is very high in potassium and other minerals so the body is not being robbed of vital nutrients when dandelion is used as a diuretic.

Dandelion is a very safe, valuable and useful plant with many medicinal uses. It is considered a tonic (tones the body), reduces water weight gain, a mild laxative, helps to eliminate toxins from the blood, promotes healthy digestion and will soothe an irritated stomach, acts as an anti-rheumatic, helps support the liver and kidneys, keeps the bowels in a healthy condition, stabilizes blood sugar, reduces blood pressure, has shown anti-tumor properties and clears the skin of impurities.

The milky juice from the stems and leaves acts as a fungicide and has antibacterial properties. The juice has been shown to be effective in the treatment of warts, corns, stings and blisters.

The dandelion plant contains one of the highest levels of vitamin A of all greens and also contains high concentrations of vitamin C, iron, calcium, potassium and electrolytes.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: brebis noire on May 24, 2007, 08:20:02 AM
I have about 1/6 of the garden in - it's a 10 X 40 foot plot, and every year I have to reclaim some of it from the "lawn". I finally got meself one of those long-handled twisty things to remove weeds, turn the soil, mix compost and all that. It always takes me several days each year to get the thing planted, but once it's in I usually try to let it go by itself, not too much weeding and I almost never water it.

I've planted small plants of lettuce and cabbage this year for the first time. I'm going to do staggered planting of lettuce and beans and maybe some other things too so I don't get everything all at once - which usually happens when I'm away for a few days.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on May 24, 2007, 08:40:45 AM
Let us know how cabbage goes, Brebis. I wanted to try them, but was discouraged because I've heard they're very tricky to keep worm free it you're growing organically.

Debra, your dandelion link reminds me of this book I saw (damned if I can remember the title, it was a history/cookbook about the cuisine of a Lebanese family who moved to Saskatchewan early this century) which had a whole chapter on dandelion recipes. They looked good. Only, it's a big risk to cook with dandelions today from what I gather because they keep chemicals for such a long time (several years) and there's a good chance that people tried to eradicate them a few times with herbicide....
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 24, 2007, 10:34:24 AM
Dunno about organic, but I'm doing cabbage and lettuce here. I sprained a finger in my left hand last night taking the sod off so I have to take it easy, but it's warmed up a bit, so I'll be planting a few shrubs and trees today. I'm waiting for a load of muck (our version of black topsoil) this weekend and then have to get the thr rototiller here, then all my seeds will be planted - certainly no later than next week.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Debra on May 24, 2007, 11:00:23 AM
Kuri are are a couple of good links for organic ways to fight cabbage worms etc.

http://www.planetnatural.com/site/xdpy/ ... bbage.html (http://www.planetnatural.com/site/xdpy/kb/growing-cabbage.html)

    * Aphids (http://gardening.about.com/od/vegetables/a/Cabbage_Kale_3.htm) - Control aphids by spraying with frequent hard blasts of water; try spraying with insecticidal soap or hot pepper spray.

    * Cabbage Loopers - The small white moths in the gardens lay eggs that turn into cabbage loopers. Cover the plants with screening or floating row cover to prevent this.

    * Susceptible to Soil Borne Diseases - Rotate crops; i.e., do not plant any members of the cabbage family (including broccoli, cauliflower, kohlrabi, rapini, Brussels sprouts, mustard) in the same place for four years.

Mother Jones (http://www.motherjones.com/news/outfront/1995/03/penenberg.html)
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Croghan27 on May 24, 2007, 04:15:50 PM
Speaking of bugs and wee beasties .... this is the day of the end of one 17 years cycle or the beginning of another.  :shock:

7 billion circades will visit Illinois today (http://web.extension.uiuc.edu/cicadas/13or17year.html).   :D
Title: Garden planning
Post by: alisea on May 24, 2007, 04:23:39 PM
Lots of good stuff on organic lawn and garden care here at Halifax's Ecology Action Centre's web site (http://www.ecologyaction.ca/urban_issues/urban_proj_pest_lawncare.shtm).
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 26, 2007, 04:41:46 PM
Finally got a big truckload of muck (aka topsoil) today - now the really hard work begins, moving it around to the gardens and lawns.

Don't be surprised if you don't hear from me much - I have a lot of outdoor work to do. The birds keep me company, and Cassie (german shepherd dog from across the road) is over every day.  :garden
Title: Garden planning
Post by: brebis noire on May 26, 2007, 04:48:39 PM
1/3 of the garden now in. Tomatoes. I think I planted them too close together (again) this year.  :? They look so small and forlorn now, but just wait till August - it will be tomato jungle all over again. I'm not so good at keeping up with things by that time, but isn't one supposed to go around trimming off bits so that the tomatoes that are already on the vine can ripen quicker? Any easy tomato tips out there? And when I say easy, it better not involve cord, stakes and engineering.  :)
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on May 26, 2007, 05:29:21 PM
So glad boom boom you can at least move your dirt around, that is something and will help you plan whilst your doing that manual labour.

Brebis I envy your tomatoes, I can't find any room to grow even one.

What a wonderful full day and wonderful weather pattern to match. I mowed first. But what a surprise when I went to utility shed. Landlord left me a huge bag of weed n feed plus a bag of golf course green grass seed. Ha!

Right at bottom of stairs at front porch is a big bare nothing. So I worked it and worked it readying for grass seed. Nice n cloudy as well. Got the seed in, light covering, then did all the bare patches, since it's gonna rain all day tomorrow. I can't use the weed n feed within a 24 hour rain, so no go until early next week.

I did all of my work outside, inside when I suddenly heard "SADIE, GET OVER HERE"  next door neighbour's dog first shat in my front yard and then gullumped thru the new grass seed bed. Thank gawd she can't actually reach my Lilies/snaps/nicotina/glads. I was kinda miffed at that.

Went to free greenhouses at Gage and walked OZ thru. Whilst I was ditzing with the S. American birds, Oz jumped into the Koi pond, leash and all.  :oops:   No one saw even tho there are security cameras. No one approached me when I left either.

Oh and Eph I think I have found a natural spring fed quarry for Oz to swim in. Gonna check it out at beg. of week. Quarry is behind 1812 monument beneath mtn. under Hwy. 20  :D
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 26, 2007, 06:10:01 PM
I have about 45 tomato plants starting to poke through the soil in indoor peats pots. Hope it warms up soon, and that my greenhouse arrives soon. Altogether I have about 100 small peat pots of seeds to transplant. Then I have to start outdoor seeding for veggies and flowers. This is going to be a busy summer! The shubbery and trees I planted, by the way, are sprouting green blossoms.  :)

ETA: Now 720pm, and it's 17C - perfect day for working outdoors.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: alisea on May 26, 2007, 07:29:19 PM
BB, sounds great! Um, I'd watch out on the numbers of tomato plants, though  -- at least if they all take root and grow. You may find yourself inundated :-D

And you all know never, ever, ever to plant more than three zucchini plants, don't you?  :shock:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on May 26, 2007, 07:41:41 PM
45. tomato plants.  :shock:

Boom Boom, you just got yourself an industry. Round about October, we'll talk canning.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 26, 2007, 07:44:26 PM
Quote from: alisea
And you all know never, ever, ever to plant more than three zucchini plants, don't you?  :shock:


I don't plant zuchinni. Last time I did, in Ottawa, I ended up giving them away by the bushel basket - into every unlocked car I could find in the Byward Market.  :spy:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 26, 2007, 07:46:27 PM
Quote from: skdadl
45. tomato plants.  :shock:

Boom Boom, you just got yourself an industry. Round about October, we'll talk canning.


If they grow, I'll be giving them away to my neighbours, who have been really good to me over the years, and mightily tolerant of my lifestyle.  :spy:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Holly Stick on May 27, 2007, 01:13:04 AM
I just got a begonia, with two big beautiful blooms on it.  So would it be better to keep it as an indoor plant, or to plant it out in the flower garden?
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Debra on May 27, 2007, 06:18:19 AM
here's the care for indoors (if it's the same variety)

    *  LIGHT: Place in high light (full sun) for best growth. Tolerates medium (bright indirect) light.
    * WATER: Allow soil surface to dry slightly between thorough waterings. Mist daily with tepid water. Raise humidity.
    * TEMPERATURE: Maintain average temperatures during the day, but let them fall into the 50s at night. May not bloom in high temperatures.


they are beautiful indoors and out. If you can keep them in flower they would be cheery during the winter months.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on May 27, 2007, 06:38:42 AM
There are two (at least) kinds of begonias, the ones that grow from big tubers and then ... the others. If you have big, beautiful blossoms, I think you have the big tubers, and those need to be rested during the winter. You can easily find instructions on how to dig them up, clean them off, dust with sulphur, I think, store them, and then repot to get them started in late winter.

Tubers are like bulbs or rhizomes -- they need their little death, indoors or out. Begonias are probably happiest outside in the summer, but I don't think they can survive our winters outside (as most bulbs can).  

The begonias with the smaller flowers all over -- those may be better houseplants, although I've never had much luck keeping them going. I also kill azaleas, though.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: deBeauxOs on May 27, 2007, 01:04:28 PM
Quote from: brebis noire
... Tomatoes. ... They look so small and forlorn now ... isn't one supposed to go around trimming off bits so that the tomatoes that are already on the vine can ripen quicker? ...
If you're going to be planting tomatoes every year, it's worth making or getting wire 'cages' for them.  I have the funnel-shaped ones.  I start pinching away at side-sprouting flower stems as soon as fruit sets on the first blossoms.  I also trim away about 1/2 of the leafy branches so the sun can ripen the fruit quicker.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: brebis noire on May 27, 2007, 01:58:18 PM
I have the wire cages, but only the biggest ones can handle the jungle without toppling or bending. I really need to keep up with the pruning, but it kind of snowballs at a certain point.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on May 27, 2007, 02:24:23 PM
We used the wire cages for years at the old place, and they worked fine, even without pruning. It never occurred to moi to prune, I must confess.

If you plant beans in a circle around each caged plant, they will grow up the cages, which is a bonus, and you'll be harvesting the beans earlier than most of the toms.

Now I have the upside-down device. I still haven't rigged it up for this year. I guess I should get going, eh? *guilted smiley*
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Holly Stick on May 27, 2007, 04:11:57 PM
Thanks for the begonia advice, Debra and skdadl.  It probably is a tuber type, the blossoms are huge.  I think I will keep it inside for now.

Yesterday I was on a tour of three historical gardens, at the Lougheed House (http://www.lougheedhouse.com/html/houseGardens.html), Central Memorial Park (a very Victorian garden, symmetrical, with careful geometric shapes) and the Reader Rock Garden (http://www.limedesign.ab.ca/reader/), where a City Parks employee lieved and turned a barren sandy hill into an amazing rock garden.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: k'in on May 27, 2007, 04:45:32 PM
The tuberous begonias are super sensitive to the cold and are the first to wilt in the fall.  I don't know if it is the proper thing to do, but I've dug them up, put the tuber parts in a brown paper bag with a bit of cedar mulch and stuck them in the basement for the winter.  Planted them again around this time of year (risk of frost over) and they've done well.  I like the other begonias too  Around here they call them "waxy" begonias (not sure the proper name).  They are fairly wimpy until late summer but are beautiful through the late fall and seem to be able to withstand some cold.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 27, 2007, 05:36:42 PM
As incredible as it sounds in an age of global warming, we're still a week away from outdoor planting, because overnight lows will fall to 1C by Thursday this week. All I can do in the meantime is continue spreading the muck (topsoil), erect the fence,  and build my new greenhouse.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on May 27, 2007, 06:44:52 PM
Couldn't you put in seeds, Boom Boom? I know a lot of people put in seeds a few weeks earlier than when the danger of frost is over, with the notion that they won't break the soil for a few weeks anyway.

I'm actually thinking about reclaiming seeds now. The spinach and lettuce that I'd planted in pots indoors last February as all gone to seed. Ideally, I'd like to just reuse what's on the plants. I'm trying out a method whereby you string up the seedy stalk from the ceiling until it dries out and then shake the seeds out onto a plate to be planted again. Hopefully they're seedy enough for that by now.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: deBeauxOs on May 27, 2007, 06:49:14 PM
Quote from: skdadl
... Now I have the upside-down device. ...
It sounds like Boom Boom is planting enough tomato plants to spread the fruit of his .... er, travails, all over B'n'R.  :P
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Berlynn on May 27, 2007, 06:58:37 PM
I expect Boom Boom to be marketing the fruit of his labour to one and all this fall.  If anyone has more details about what to prune from tomato plants, would you please share?  I've never done it before and could stand to have tomatoes ripening earlier.

Kuri, I saved seeds from last year's spinach but they did not germinate for me when I planted them a couple of weeks ago.  The ones from the store have already grown about an inch and were planted a few days later.  I'm wondering, now, if I took them from the plant too soon.

Also, I dry my herbs in much the same way you are saving seeds.  I tie a bunch together and put it into a paper bag which I hang from the rafters of the studio until all is dry.  It's a wonderful way to have my own parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme, as well as oregano, throughout the winter!
Title: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on May 27, 2007, 07:04:50 PM
I'm sort of worried about exactly that, Berlynn. I mean, they look about as bolted as they can be, but I'm just learning on this and I have no idea how long they must stay on the plant.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Berlynn on May 27, 2007, 07:17:24 PM
I spoke with a friend of mine earlier this week and was happy to hear that her spinach and lettuces came up of their own accord this year!  I plant mine in a large-ish pot that I transport to the cottage when we're there so I'm now wondering what might happen if I just leave it in there until next year.  I can always amend the soil with compost or water with compost tea next year, I figure...
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 27, 2007, 09:33:03 PM
I really wasn't thinking when I planted all those tomato seeds. I got four packets of different tomato seeds for ninety cents each, and each packet has about 50 seeds. That's 200 seeds, and I planted only 45. I was thinking "the more the merrier". But, 45 tomato plants could conceivably give me 45 tomatoes a day.  :shock: Well, maybe they won't all grow.  :oops: I'm thankful I didn't buy any zucchini seed.  :lol:
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 27, 2007, 09:34:53 PM
Quote from: kuri
Couldn't you put in seeds, Boom Boom? I know a lot of people put in seeds a few weeks earlier than when the danger of frost is over, with the notion that they won't break the soil for a few weeks anyway.


Oh, gosh, no way. The frost will kill any seeds planted before the frost danger is over, or so I've been told by local gardeners.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 27, 2007, 09:37:31 PM
Quote from: deBeauxOs
Quote from: skdadl
... Now I have the upside-down device. ...
It sounds like Boom Boom is planting enough tomato plants to spread the fruit of his .... er, travails, all over B'n'R.  :P


Well, if they all grow, I'll certainly have leftovers. I'm going to read up on "sun dried tomatoes" as that's something I've never tried.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Karen on May 27, 2007, 11:21:32 PM
Ornamental cabbage - can you eat it?  I have been planting this stuff for years, becuz it's a really hardy beautiful planter plant and it's great to look at.  But today I am stuffing boxes outside the seniors home, and this wonderful old gril informs me that I am decorating with edibles.  So, I googled it and found that ornamental cabbage is indeed edible, does anyone know if it tastes okay or...not?
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Gigi on May 27, 2007, 11:45:31 PM
Quote from: Karen
So, I googled it and found that ornamental cabbage is indeed edible, does anyone know if it tastes okay or...not?


No.  It's tough and I think I'd rather eat dry grass than do that again.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Mandos on May 27, 2007, 11:46:13 PM
Perhaps only ornamental people can eat ornamental cabbage.  There may be an entire parallel culinary universe of ornamentality.  Beware, though, some of it may actually just be ornery.
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Karen on May 27, 2007, 11:47:52 PM
:)  :)
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on July 14, 2007, 03:33:47 PM
I was just out in my gardens, and it looks like I will have a harvest - small, but something, nonetheless. I'm grateful to have anything growing after the awful weather we had.

The potato plants are doing very well. The carrots, cucumber, lettuce, and beans are coming along - very slowly, but they're coming. Also the sunflowers - very slowly, but they're growing. I think the turnip is coming through, too, and the asparagus (no fruit until next year) plants are huge.

The watermelon, pumpkin, strawberries, and tomatoes all are kaput, so I won't try them next year.

The blackflies are awful - just everywhere. I'm using Off! to keep them away. Need to shower when I come inside.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on July 26, 2008, 02:56:34 PM
One of our favourite porn sites is suing Canada Post for $20 Mil  :cool: (http://www.cba.org/ClassActions/class_2008/ontario/pdf/06-05-2008_CanadaPost1.pdf)
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on July 26, 2008, 05:28:01 PM
:applause:

I love it! Go, Lee Valley!

And yeah, I had to look closely to be sure I was reading that figure correctly -- 20 mill. Way to fight the bureaucracy!
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on July 26, 2008, 09:52:13 PM
Oooo my front garden is full of fireflys! The courtship flash patterns are everywhere.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Glue ... ImWald.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:GluehwuermchenImWald.jpg)
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Debra on July 26, 2008, 10:52:07 PM
ooo you're so lucky! I haven't seen fireflies since I was a kid.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: 'lance on July 26, 2008, 11:41:28 PM
Me either. Saw a bunch of flying ants today, which I also hadn't seen since I was a kid. But it's just not the same, you know?
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on July 27, 2008, 12:26:05 AM
It's the wet weather, they really like it. Only the males fly and flash eh and the females prefer fast, longer flashes before they will signal a return from the bush. Sometimes the females just sit on a plant and light up in return, then when the male gets there, she kills and eats him. It's a fine line between sex and death.  ;)
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Debra on July 27, 2008, 08:01:45 AM
Quote
Me either. Saw a bunch of flying ants today, which I also hadn't seen since I was a kid. But it's just not the same, you know?

Quite!

TD there are so many jokes I could make from that post.... :lol:

Apparently there really is a fine line between sex and death, There is the french expression la petite mort and this (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_little_death)

Quote
A recent study of brain activation patterns using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) give some support to the experience of a small death:

    To some degree, the present results seem to be in accordance with this notion, because female orgasm is associated with decreased blood flow in the orbitofrontal cortex, a part of the brain that is crucial for behavioural control
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: deBeauxOs on July 27, 2008, 10:26:30 AM
Quote from: Toedancer
... Only the males fly and flash eh and the females prefer fast, longer flashes before they will signal a return from the bush. Sometimes the females just sit on a plant and light up in return, then when the male gets there, she kills and eats him.
... but not before she has her way with him.  That part is very important, TD, and it's one that we feminazis want to indoctrinate all young women to remember.   :twisted:
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on July 27, 2008, 10:53:25 AM
:banghead
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Debra on August 13, 2008, 04:27:59 PM
Wrote about my balcony garden on the Front Page.

Again if anyone wants to write an article or crosspost let me know.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on August 13, 2008, 04:47:19 PM
Wrote you a comment, Debra. That balcony garden is quite an achievement.

I doubt that you want a morbid reflection from moi about letting a garden go to weeds for two years, so ...   ;)
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on March 14, 2009, 05:37:38 PM
I've worked like a demon raking again. LL is bringing me the huge brown bags tomorrow as well as a new one flush environmental toilet. Anyway it seems a little earlier than last March to see the Lilies coming up already. These are the Tigers up first. I went up the railway track and got a big rock to place in front of them cuz dog next door was frisky and jumping about in the garden with me.

So I've done some inventory and will not be doing nasties in the sloping corner where the old stump is. No, I've decided on seeding larkspur, white cosmos, and then working downwards to feverfew, flax and viola, alyssum. It's March break, so I also did the big scary 'don't fuck with this corner kids' speech.

What success have people had with seeding viola, alyssum, feverfew?  I already know seeding cosmos, larkspur is easy and resilient. Any other suggestions welcome.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: BCseawalker on March 14, 2009, 05:53:05 PM
Anyone here do container gardening, sans balcony or outdoor terrace?
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: lagatta on March 14, 2009, 08:17:24 PM
Not really, except starting things indoors, and rooting slips, doing sprouts etc. That because the most proletarian of typical Montréal triplexes might have worthless plumbing, heating, insulation etc but do have balconies fore and aft.

I would like to do container gardening of edibles more seriously. The systems I've seen for that are so far too expensive to be worthwhile.

There are many rooftop gardening projects afloat
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Audrey on March 16, 2009, 02:36:25 PM
I planted tomatoes, onions, lettuce, cucumbers on my parents rooftop deck last year in containers, in dirt, and they great just fine- really fine ! Equiterre has some rooftop gardens- they have kits for home as well Lagatta. They also have them for stairwells.

I am looking forward to planting this year- I am on the ground so I have access to dirt. I am going to plant lettuce, asparagus, onions, strawberries, cucumbers, rhubarb. I have a composter and I have to  buy a rain barrel. Have to get that composter started.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on March 16, 2009, 03:09:02 PM
Strawberries and rhubarb, God bless 'em, just take care of themselves through so much. Once you've got them going, you won't be able to stop them.   :mrgreen:

Raspberry canes are even more aggressive: you have to beat them back before they attack you.  ;)

But the other vegetables you list all do take some tending, and most really need that hit of sun in the summer months, as well as a lot of water, so it matters where you put them.

There are some herbs I would never plant in anything but containers because they become so invasive so quickly, weeds, really, in open gardenland. Never, for any reason, plant lemon balm, eg, in open ground. You will never be able to get rid of it without digging up your entire garden.

Other special herbs, like basil, are nice in containers just because they are so tender and fragile, and you don't want anything else interfering with them.

I wish I could be planting this spring, but I'm probably going to be moving soon, so all I want to do is get the garden nicely trimmed and cleaned up. Given the dead tree and the weed trees (I hate Manitoba maples!) that are out there, that in itself is going to be major work.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: lagatta on March 16, 2009, 03:11:46 PM
You're really thinking of moving? With six cats?
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on March 16, 2009, 03:12:52 PM
Well, yeah. All bright ideas welcome.  :(
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Debra on March 16, 2009, 03:18:46 PM
basil is a great companion plant for tomatoes. Dill planted in among tomatoes will attract the tomato horn worm protecting your tomatoes.

I've managed to successfully overwinter two pots of impatients, a couple of geraniums and some coleus. That will be the beginning of my garden. I want to get some tomato, and plant lettuce and some herbs. I miss my rhubarb and strawberry plants and my spring bulbs. Maybe this fall I will plant some in pots if I have the coin for bulbs and soil.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Debra on March 16, 2009, 03:19:55 PM
Cats like kids are highly transportable and even tenant law is such that you can't be denied your right to pets even if you sign a lease saying you won't have any.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: lagatta on March 16, 2009, 03:24:40 PM
Don't really have any. If I were a Torontonian, I'd be looking into eventually geting into the "Older Women's Co-operative" (which is mixed-age, including some children), but while they are definitely amenable to accepting some furry companions, I doubt they'd accept six.

http://www.olderwomensnetwork.org/housing-statement.htm (http://www.olderwomensnetwork.org/housing-statement.htm)

Quote
Ann Farrell and her cat Henry is a long-time member. She has served on its board of directors and various co-op committees and says: "After a long and often fruitless search for safe and affordable housing, OWN Co-op has not only been that for me, it is also a great community in which to live. Although there’s public transit at my door, I can also walk to grocery and other stores, theatres, movies, restaurants, my doctor’s, and it’s just a short walk to Toronto’s lakeshore."

Debra, agree about both the basil/tomato pairing and the cats, but just as it is illegal to discriminate against children, tenants CAN be evicted for "overpopulating" a dwelling, at least here in Québec and I doubt the law is any better in Ontario.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Debra on March 16, 2009, 03:56:08 PM
6 cats is allowed however,

Quote
How many animals are you legally allowed to own?
The City of Toronto Municipal Code, Chapter 349 (PDF file size 95KB) states that no person can keep more than six of any combination of dogs, cats, ferrets and rabbits at any given time in their home. Within the combination of dogs, cats, ferrets and rabbits the maximum number of dogs permitted per dwelling unit is three.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on March 16, 2009, 04:02:10 PM
Thanks very much for the solid data, everyone. Maybe we'll talk about this in a safer place?  ;)  Since I really do want to pick people's brains.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on March 16, 2009, 04:39:45 PM
Quote from: skdadl
Raspberry canes are even more aggressive: you have to beat them back before they attack you.  ;)

This was one of my happiest discoveries in recent years. My absolute favourite fruit is also the easiest to grow and the strongest against the monster dandelions.

A woman I used to work with at the bank once told me about raspberry canes she'd planted alongside a detached garage. They got huge and sent out shoots clear underneath the concrete garage foundation to pop up again on the other side of the structure!

My plans this year: do not allow every last seedling to succumb to mould again. I'm going to hire someone to fix my grading and to install window wells. Then any future gardens will be built up rather than dug out. I had a revelation when I became single: life's too short for well, a lot of things, but in particular life is too short to dig in clay. Especially now that I've learnt I don't have to.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Audrey on March 16, 2009, 05:42:07 PM
I was going to plant some lemon grass to keep away the racoons- is it equally invasive ?
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Debra on March 16, 2009, 05:44:21 PM
a Kuri sighting!!!  :applause:

How've you been? :hug:
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on March 16, 2009, 06:02:59 PM
Hi Debra. I'm plugging along, still. :)
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on March 16, 2009, 06:03:16 PM
Hi, kuri.   :tbwave:
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: kuri on March 16, 2009, 08:42:54 PM
Hullo, skdadl! :)
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on April 14, 2009, 10:19:57 PM
Did you buy/receive Easter Lilies or any kind of lilies? Don't throw them out. I re-plant in garden every spring and get another bounty each and every time same season. I just got my hands on 2 of my nabes lily plants, one is a starburst (the flavourful/scented ones) and am going to replant.....this weekend!! Yes I Can!
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Antonia on April 14, 2009, 11:19:10 PM
Careful with lilies and kitties.

http://www.cfa.org/articles/lilies.html
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on April 14, 2009, 11:25:08 PM
Goodness, I had no idea. But I've been doing it for donkey years and Shithead doesn't even notice and if he is so idiotic to eat any part of it, well, it was good knowing you!
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on April 15, 2009, 09:21:39 AM
Starbursts are my favourites -- gorgeous colour, and they are spicy. I used to have some species tiger lilies, the old-fashioned fully recurved Turks' caps, which I just loved too -- very tall, had to be staked, but such happy plants.

I think I vaguely knew that cats shouldn't eat them, but my guys never seemed interested. I wonder whether the problem is more with plants indoors, where cats do sometimes start chewing greenery, just for lack of grass, I guess.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: deBeauxOs on April 15, 2009, 11:48:29 AM
I wonder if Boom Boom is thinking about a garden again this year.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on August 20, 2009, 11:28:19 AM
I cannot find my trowel.   :evil:

Well, I didn't have a chance this year, given that I switched gardens at the end of July, but I did cart out with me a pot of five basil plants and a very pretty ... something perennial ... that a friend gave me, and I'd like to get them into the ground now. The basil should go on giving till October at least, and the perennial (wish I could remember what it's called) would have a chance to take root.

I think it's too late to do anything else but think of planting bulbs in the fall. I'm not entirely sure whether there are any here already -- wish I'd thought to ask previous owner. Daffs, hyacinths, lilies for next summer, and the little guys, chionodoxas and scillas ... those should all start turning up at garden centres in a month or so. Oh, and tulips and crocuses ... spring is such fun. And so far away right now ...
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: deBeauxOs on August 20, 2009, 12:19:58 PM
Between now and the time they close for the season, garden centres offer a wide variety of perennials, many at reduced prices to avoid storing them over winter and schlepping them out again next summer.

Some perennials actually do better if planted in the fall.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: brebis noire on August 20, 2009, 12:33:06 PM
oh, yes, it's the best time to plant perennials - I've planted in late September and they've done well. There's also the chrysanthemums and sedums that bloom in fall...

Spring has been so wet and cool in recent years that it's been discouraging to plant. Fall has been dryer and warmer, hopefully we'll have a good one this year to make up for this near-disaster of a summer. If I'm not slightly brown by mid-August, I just don't think I can face the winter.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on October 17, 2009, 03:04:08 PM
Drat. I was hoping to make it to the garden centre today, but there's too much else happening. I wonder whether they're open on Sundays. I'm beyond being too refined about this, but I must have a big clump of daffs smiling at me next spring from a patch laid bare by demolition, and there are spots for the little early guys -- crocuses, chionodoxas, scillas -- who will blossom before it's warm enough to get serious about spring planting.

Anyone else working last-minute on the bulbs?
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Berlynn on October 18, 2009, 02:14:35 AM
I'll be mucking about in the garden tomorrow.  It was 24 today and I was at a writers' conference, but I'm skipping the meeting tomorrow so I can clean up and move perennials and bulbs around.  And I'm going to plant another tree, I think.  I want another crabapple, or maybe another kind of apple out front.  I also have some perennial seeds I'm going to try to plant.  My friend does it all the time, but I've never tried.  I'll let you know how it turns out some time next year!
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on December 02, 2009, 03:02:01 PM
I can has tulips next spring! And chionodoxas! Go me!   :Garden1

I ordered these online at the last minute, and was amazed I could do that. I've never planted anything this late, but our ground isn't frozen and in fact it's a lovely warm day here today (+10), so I got half of what I'd ordered into a small space out front that has looked kind of colourless and sad. I did it all with a trowel, too, no spade (my over-efficient moving helpers who thought I should simplify my life left my spade and shovel behind for junque guys), so my knees and ankles are at the moment moaning in the background -- but I dood it.

So that's ten white tulips (Weisse Berliner) with chionodoxas overplanted out front. Maybe later, if knees recover, but if not tomorrow (in the rain, but still promising almost as warm), clumps of ten of the biggest, yellowest daffodils they still had (forget the name, just wanted giants) to go out back, where I can see them from my breakfast table, with some scillas overplanted (and with luck those will naturalize). Daffs really have to go deep, but I think the soil is even easier in that spot, so I hope my trowel is enough to get them in without my collapsing from the effort.

The worms are still pretty lively. Apologies to the few I severed, but they seemed to recover fast enough. A curse is hereby levelled against any squirrel evil enough to try raiding -- I disguised the freshly dug spot pretty well, I think.

If I can just sit in my kitchen on a cold day next spring and look at a drift of daffodils, I will know I made it home.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on December 02, 2009, 03:42:44 PM
Good on you!

I covered some bulbs with some old burlap I had from potato bags, then covered that with rocks!
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Berlynn on December 02, 2009, 04:57:19 PM
I didn't get the gladiola bulbs dug up and now my garden is covered with a lovely 3-inch thick blanket of fluff!

Congrats to those who met the seasonal deadlines!
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on December 02, 2009, 06:32:33 PM
I've just been watching some war footage, and it occurred to me that one fast way to dig that deep trench I need tomorrow for the daffs would be to ... Uh, never mind. And besides, I don't know anyone who owns a machine gun.  ;)
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on December 02, 2009, 08:27:36 PM
The problem with using a machine gun to dig a garden trench, dollink, is that unless you dig the bullets out afterwards, they will eventually rust and damage the crops you plant. Don't ask me how I know this. :whis:
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: deBeauxOs on December 02, 2009, 10:40:12 PM
Think low-tech.  Aren't there specialized breeds of dogs who live, breathe, dig?

Here you go (http://www.essortment.com/hobbies/trainjackrusse_spce.htm).  They climb trees too.  And also.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Berlynn on December 03, 2009, 12:44:57 AM
Any garden work, digging, moving, hauling or what have you (!) is easily solved with the 20-20 solution.  $20 for a strong 20-something. ;)
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on December 03, 2009, 08:04:47 AM
Great suggestions, although it later occurred to me that any of the rapid-dirt-dispersal methods (bombs, grenades, Jack Russell terriers) leave one with the problem of widely dispersed dirt, when what one needs is a neat little pile that can easily be scooped back in over the bulbs.

I like to do as much as I can myself -- I can appreciate a pretty garden someone else has built or tidied for me, but it's not the same, eh? There are limits on what I can do, but those daffs are going in the ground today and they're going to like it. The knees and ankles feel surprisingly good this a.m. It has rained and will again, but that should make the soil easier to work with, and will tuck the bulbs in snugly afterwards.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on December 03, 2009, 04:50:20 PM
Done. Daffs and scillas in, very easy digging even that deep (daffs are big bulbs) with just the trowel because the soil was nice and damp from rain this a.m. Top not so well disguised as yesterday, but squirrels don't like daffs.

Still warm enough out there, but the dark is coming on; the wind is picking up and sounds eerie if you have your windows open a crack; and temperatures plummet tomorrow. Well, I always did work best to a deadline. Snow: I double-dare you!
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on January 16, 2010, 07:57:56 PM
Well, so. To cheer ourselves up, who has started to think about seeds or advance ordering of spring stuff or whatever? The online garden places are probably still on holidays -- has anyone checked? When they suddenly start up again, they move very fast.

Back in the 80s, early 90s, the magical Cruikshanks in Toronto would be sending out their spring catalogue about now, and I tell you, that was a thing of beauty. Not only was it full of gorgeous stuff, but it taught -- I learned so much about gardening  from those good people, and they delivered or did mail order. Then Heather Reisman bought them, fetishized them for Indigo for a while, and then abandoned them altogether.   :evil:

At this very moment, I wish I could find someone who was selling good old-fashioned pelargoniums, what most people call geraniums. No reason they couldn't be sold in shops or shipped year 'round because they're quite happy as houseplants. I've gone for years without any, inside or out, but I am feeling a powerful yearning for them now, just can't find any.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on January 16, 2010, 08:14:32 PM
Veseys (online) has been sending me garden offers regularly. I have my May order ready to send, but I'll wait until winter is over. I've received about five print seed catalogs this month alone.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on January 17, 2010, 08:59:10 AM
Gee, Boom Boom -- I've just spent an hour sailing about the Veseys (http://www.veseys.com/ca/en/) site -- all your fault!  ;)

I like doing some things from seed, but I'm lazy enough to wish I could get some of those things already started, as wee plants. What do you do for soil when you're getting so many things started from seed indoors?

Some seeds -- nasturtiums, eg, or morning glories -- are happy being planted directly outdoors, bless them. I'm not sure I trust myself to start an entire garden in peat pots indoors though.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on January 17, 2010, 09:15:27 AM
Always at your service, ma'am. ;)

The local store sells bags of potting soil, and I have organic pots made from I think dried manure. I usually don't start anything for planting outdoors until May 1st as our outdoor planting season doesn't usually begin until mid-June, although if we continue to have a mild winter (unlikely) then I might start a few weeks earlier. I love Veseys, by the way, and am thinking of ordering their tiny tiller this spring - two folks here have them and love them.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on February 24, 2010, 09:36:06 AM
It's actually been the mildest winter in our history, so I ordered my seeds for planting. We still have frost every night - there's no snow anywhere here - and the ground is still pretty hard, so I don't know exactly how much earlier I'll be able to plant than normally is the case.

 

Here's what I ordered, for our Hardiness Zone 3a and below:

 

Vista Watermelon
Red Baron Onion
Burpee's Rhubarb Swiss Chard
Stir-Fry Collection Veggies
Blue Curled Scotch Kale
Lettuce Collection
Seaside Mix Wildflowers (can tolerate some salt spray)
Cucumber Collection
Carrot Collection
Bird & Butterfly Mix Wildflowers (designed to attract butterflies and small birds)
Indigo Radicchio
Helenor Organic Turnip

(cross posted to another forum)
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on February 24, 2010, 11:09:54 AM
Boom Boom, have you thought of ordering some bulbs as well? There are some bulbs that do well planted in spring, although fall is the bigger season for bulb planting. But spring-planted lilies will bloom their first summer, if maybe not as splendidly as after a winter. Daylilies, which are very showy, might be an even better idea for where you are -- they're tough, and they naturalize, or at least the basic varieties do -- in Ontario and NY state they grow wild.

I found a very good Canadian online source last fall -- I'll see whether I still have the records (I don't seem to have bookmarked). But you should be able to google some up easily with "bulbs Canada" or some such combination.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on February 24, 2010, 11:45:07 AM
Oh, I planted over 50 bulbs last fall, which should start to sprout in May or June, perhaps even earlier if our mild winter continues.

I'll post the list of bulbs I planted as soon as possible - and I already had perrenials planted from 2006. I have a beautiful flower garden! One of the flowers is fairly exotic.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on February 24, 2010, 12:28:41 PM
Here's what I planted last fall: (from Veseys)

Wild Flower Bulb Mix
710803 Package of 75

All Summer Lily Mixture
712939 Package of 30 Bulbs

105 bulbs! Oh my goodness.  :D

Last spring (2009) I planted:

Tree Peony 'Rockii' - one bulb
 
Deluxe Peony Trio

They all blossomed very well, hope they do so again this year.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on February 24, 2010, 12:45:09 PM
You planted a tree peony and it blossomed first year? What size was it when you received it, and how big did it get? Those things really do become trees.

I've just been drooling over Vesey's m'self. They've got my Arctic blue willow, and some wonderful roses, good enough to substitute for my lost favourite back two houses ago.   :(

And then I need teh herbs, and at least a start on some perennials. Mustn't get carried away ...    :panic
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Berlynn on February 24, 2010, 01:55:50 PM
Quote from: skdadl
And then I need teh herbs, and at least a start on some perennials. Mustn't get carried away ...    :panic

Oh that you all lived but a block away!  In the middle of the night I would drop the perennials I've dug from my beds at your doorstep then run like the wind! :twisted:  Tulipa tarda is the first to arrive...even before the scilla and the tulips.  :mrgreen:
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on February 24, 2010, 02:02:00 PM
Berlynn - you made laugh, because that's what I used to under cover of the dark with the mountains of zucchini from our gardens in Ottawa and Kanata!  :mrgreen:   Later on, when the neighbours got wise and sat up all night on their front porch with a shotgun, I'd load the trunk with zucchini then drive to Ottawa's Byward Market and dump it all inside some unsuspecting motorist's car while they were shopping. :whis:
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on February 24, 2010, 02:04:59 PM
Quote from: skdadl
You planted a tree peony and it blossomed first year? What size was it when you received it, and how big did it get? Those things really do become trees.

I got it as a sinch (six inch) seedling from Veseys, and it grew almost two feet in the first year (last year... ) and produced one gorgeous dark crimson flower.

Hey, anyone wanna send any perrenials my way, feel free to do so!  :age:
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on February 24, 2010, 02:11:04 PM
The tulipa are wonderful -- I didn't get any of those last fall, no snowdrops or crocuses either, but I should have some chionodoxas and scillas announcing the tulips and daffs. Ooh -- I can hardly wait!

The challenge for me is a big, almost empty space. The previous owner used the garden to exercise labs and retrievers, so she was growing next to nothing that the dogs, of course, would dig up. On the one hand, that's a great opportunity -- I don't have to fiddle first with someone else's idea of garden design, which has baffled me in the past. On the other, I want to get things good from the start because it's so hard to talk yourself into a redo when you decide nope, still not working.

The front is a different story. There isn't much room there in raised beds with large evergreens in them. She did have some ground covers interplanted, but kinda drab and undistinguished things -- the whole effect is drab. I think I'll have to bite the bullet and dig out everything but the evergreens and then start over. I'm trying to stick with white, blue, and yellow at the moment, although I am such a sucker for anything that flames orange.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on February 24, 2010, 02:14:29 PM
Well, that's encouraging to me, Boom Boom. I wasn't sure of the wisdom of starting things like lilacs and roses from roots or small seedlings that arrive through the mail.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on February 24, 2010, 02:23:37 PM
The key for me was to order as late as possible, because otherwise Veseys ships them too frigging early, before the ground even has thawed! And then I'd have to figure out how to care for a basement full of seedlings, as planting time was about two months away. That happened in the spring of 2007 and 2008 before I got wise to Veseys shipping schedule. I lost a lot of very expensive plants before I wised up. :annoyed:
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on February 24, 2010, 02:42:18 PM
I found this Top Ten list for beginning veggie gardeners interesting (from Veseys):

1.Tomato – Mosaic Mix and Tomande. Start tomato seeds indoors in mid-April or 6-8 weeks before last frost. Do not put plants outside until all risk of frost has passed.
2.Beets – Merlin. No thinning is required. Plant in early May, as soon as the ground can be worked.
3.Lettuce – Baby Leaf Blend. Plant in early May, as soon as the ground can be worked. Sow every 2 weeks for a continual crop.
4.Peas – Sugar Sprint. Does not require a trellis. Plant treated seed in early May, as soon as the ground can be worked.
5.Radishes – Rebel. Plant in early May, as soon as the ground can be worked.
6.Carrots – Napoli. Best tasting early carrot. Plant in mid-May or 2-4 weeks before last frost.
7.Beans – Goldrush and Valentino. Plant treated seed in early June.
8.Cucumber – Sweeter Yet. Plant first of June after risk of frost has passed.
9.Zucchini – Richgreen. Plant in early June, after all danger of frost has passed and when the soil has warmed to 21°C.
10.Pumpkin - Neon. Compact plant. Best pumpkin for pies and Halloween. Plant in early June, after all danger of frost has passed and when the soil has warmed to 21°C.


I've had bad luck with peas, beans, and pumpkins - guess my soil isn't warm enough. All that other stuff grows okay here. Last year I had an insane crop of lettuce - over 100 head sof lettuce, and I live alone! I gave most of my entire crop of veggies away, because it was just too much. Besides, friends do assorted jobs for me at no charge, and this is my way of showing my appreciation.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on March 28, 2010, 10:34:11 AM
I found the BBC Gardening Homepage this morning:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/

Dig In! is a fun page:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/digin/your_space/patch.shtml

How guerrilla gardening took root will be of interest to city dwellers:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/8548005.stm   :garden
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on March 28, 2010, 11:22:59 AM
Oh, thank you, Boom Boom. I shall go and immerse. It's kind of grey here today, but whenever the sun comes on, I'm starting to feel I'm already behind with the planning and the ordering. Have you sent your orders in yet?
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on March 28, 2010, 11:56:00 AM
Yes, and I have all my seeds. I can list them if you're interested. I shall wait until the latest available date to order my starter plants - tomatoes and berries. They won't be sent until mid-May regardless of when I order them, which is fine, because we still have frost until then.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: deBeauxOs on March 28, 2010, 12:12:01 PM
As an experiment, I prepared four large pots for nasturtium seedlings, soaked the seeds overnight, planted them and set them out in a sunny window.  They are heirloom varieties.

Now I know les capucines can be planted directly into the ground once all danger of frost is past, but I wanted to have some annuals that will provide a wham! of bright green foliage and hopefully, early blooms once the daffodils and other bulbs have done their show.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on March 28, 2010, 04:09:36 PM
Oh, yes, please, Boom Boom. If you list your seeds, you'll remind me of things I haven't thought of, although I'm not going to be near as good as you at starting so much from seed.

Sometime this week I've got to get to a hardware to get a new spade and some soil. If the weather is going to continue this good, we're close to being able to put in starter herb plants, especially toughies like chives, and the kitchen garden here is in desperate need of a good turning-over and some nourishment. There's no border in place at the back, just grass all the way up to the fences, so I see a LOT of digging in my future, just taking up sods and working the earth that's left. Need better shoes, too, if I'm going to be doing that kind of digging.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on March 28, 2010, 08:12:26 PM
I wish it was warmer here, I'd love to start digging in my gardens, but, alas, I doubt I'll be able to get my spade dirty until at least mid-May. Anyway, without being exactly specific as to varieties and quantities, here's what I've already received - still have to order tomato and berry starter plants:

Cucumber, Lettuce, Carrot, Stir-Fry Collection, Blue Curled Scotch Kale, Indigo Radicchio, Vista Watermelon, Red Baron Onion, Burpee's Rhubarb Swiss Chard, Helenor Organic Turnip, Beets, and Radish.
 
In addition I have huge amounts of flowering seed to put around the edge of my property and in a garden box: Seaside Mix Wildflowers, and  Bird & Butterfly Mix Wildflowers

(I haven't seen any butterflies around these parts in a long time - I'e asked around and my neighbours say it's been quite a while since any butterflies have been seen on the Quebec coast - that sounds weird to me)
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on March 28, 2010, 08:33:32 PM
Hmmn. Do you get caterpillars?

Another question, Boom Boom: what do you do about soil, compost, manure, fertilizer, mulch, etc? Do you have local sources? I've just been reading gardening sites that give long recipes for mass quantities of mixes you're supposed to prepare, and I had to go lie down after that. No way I'm able to do all that.

Oh, there's just too much I want all at once. Tell me to do this baby steps at a time.

There's a beautiful near-black aquilegia (colombine) at Vesey's that I'm sure I can't find in ordinary garden centres here. There's also a perennial (!) alstromeria (Peruvian lily, a bit like a freesia), which I will bless if it actually survives a winter here -- one of my favourite flowers, but I've never been able to keep one going through the winter.

It's things like that that I will order from them, besides some seeds and maybe bushes and roses. The problem with most city garden centres is that they are very middle-of-the-road -- they're just pushing product, so they tend to sell the local cliches and tend not to know or care much about what's really possible with many species. Vesey's has both rugosas and Morden roses, eg, which are either native or bred here (Morden, Man., experimental station) -- good luck finding any of those in downtown Toronto, and yet they are much hardier and prettier, I think, than the conventional hybrids. And they have my Arctic blue willow, which I couldn't find locally last year. I'm thinking about a mock orange ... Gah! Stop me!
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on March 28, 2010, 10:49:04 PM
I have a composter, but because we don't really have warm enough weather even in summer, it takes twice as long to work as it should. So, it takes two years to get one years supply of compost. :(

Consequently, I order quite a lot of peat moss from a supplier in Sept-Iles, and spread it around. Plus, I have water-soluble fertilizer and a watering can, and am able to fertilize everything from the watering can. Veseys has a hose-attachment fertilzer spreader, but it looks scary and expensive.

Gardening is a lot of hard work and preparation, which is why I need it to get warmer quickly. However, all I can realistically do before mid-May is get everything ordered and a few things potted indoors to be transplanted outside in June.

Gardening is especially difficult here in a cold climate, so I have that going against me - as does everyone here on the coast.

The only caterpillars I've seen are  the tiny ones that turn into moths. I think we have a butterfly crisis here on the coast, I am going ask someone at Environment Canada for an explanation.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Berlynn on March 30, 2010, 06:30:37 PM
Only just a wee bit of snow left on the north side of my garden!  Cold frame's going out this weekend.  Lettuces should be ready to eat in a few short weeks!!!
Title: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 05, 2010, 11:21:38 PM
Like I've been doing for the past week, I spent half a day digging weeds out of my veggie garden, still have lots to do.  This is not a commercial venture - I do it to enjoy fresh air, get a bit of exercise, and I will have enjoyed my own fresh carrots, lettuce, swiss chard, beets, radishes, and tomatoes, and maybe rutabaga and watermelon as well.  And my friends and neighbours will have a share in what I've grown as well, at no cost to them whatsoever. My only regret is that it's a smaller garden than I really want, so I'll be looking at expanding. :garden
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on July 10, 2010, 08:09:50 PM
Well, my nastie leaves (very tasty, as always) are spilling out in all directions, as planned, but ... pas de flowers yet! I WANT SOME FLOWERS!!!
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on July 10, 2010, 09:06:37 PM
As soon as we have at least a week of sunlight, I am going to have an awesome display of flowers in full bloom. And I have ordered a bird bath fountain - powered by solar - for my bird and squirrel friends who visit each and every day.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on July 10, 2010, 09:29:41 PM
How strange skdadl you must wait for your rock candy coloured nasties, while the dog day cicadas were singing tonight. So early.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on July 10, 2010, 09:34:20 PM
I don't have any cicadas either! *stomps feet*
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on July 10, 2010, 09:57:40 PM
Boom Boom, from whom are you getting teh fountayne?
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on July 10, 2010, 10:17:28 PM
From Home Hardware. Here's a photo of it:
 
(http://www.vectacor.ca/assets/lawngarden/fountsolar90205s.jpg)
 
Home Hardware information on this item:
    Manufacturer's Info:  http://www.vectacor.ca/fountsolar90205s.html (http://www.vectacor.ca/fountsolar90205s.html)
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on July 11, 2010, 08:17:19 AM
That is very cute, Boom Boom. I should think of doing something for the boidies during the dry spells of summer.  I've thought about a garden gnome too, but maybe that's going too far. Flamingos?
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on July 11, 2010, 09:31:49 AM
That is very cute, Boom Boom. I should think of doing something for the boidies during the dry spells of summer.  I've thought about a garden gnome too, but maybe that's going too far. Flamingos?

The thing to remember about birdbaths (and maybe fountains as well) is that the water has to be changed regularly - like every day.
 
 
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on January 13, 2011, 11:36:42 AM
Boom Boom, just before I signed off last night, I went to Vesey's to have what I thought would be an early scan, but they were advertising a special reduction for orders placed by yesterday, so I ordered a few things very fast.

Most of it won't come till April earliest (although I think they ship the seeds right away, which will mean me beloved nasties), but it got my mind into the groove. They sell out so soon; I have to be quicker this year than I was last.

Got my germaniums (pelargoniums) ordered, though. Those should come soon. 
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on January 13, 2011, 12:00:41 PM
Oh you guys are making me crazy with jealousy! I am inbetween homes right now and I sooo want to move this spring/summer as you all know. So I'm thinking, well if it is out of the queshion at least I've lots to play with already, but of course I can't plan and that is all the fun, innit? I dreamt I was dreaming the other night. (This is how bad it is) In my dream within the dream I was woken up by sweetie coming into the room. I opened my eyes and saw brand new cotton sheets. I was admiring the wee colourful flower design on a cream background. My fingers began to outline the flowers when I suddenly realized Holy Fuck I'm Dreaming and these are not my sheets, and I wonder if I can grow these wee flowers! LOL, it was silly.

The trick to the fresh water everyday in the BB's is making sure you place it close to the garden hose, which of course one wants near a window to watch the play. For those with indoor cats very doable. I love watching the wariness of the birds, then the brazeness by mid-summer.

So glad you ordered in time skdadl, your garden is going to be amazing!
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on January 13, 2011, 12:31:32 PM
I still have seeds left from previous years, so I'll just be ordering seedlings - plants already started by Veseys - such as tomatoes and shrubbery. Quite a lot of shrubbery this year, actually. Three years ago I ordered small Hosta plants, and last summer they bloomed amazingly well. Last fall I planted a lot of lilly bulbs, as well as wildflowers, so I hope to have an amazing display this summer, again. I just wish I could get my veggie garden to do as well!
 
Veseys is the only company I order garden stuff from, now.
 
ETA: I'm not ordering anything until April. I risk not getting everything I want, but I don't want anything shipped here too early. I can't seed or plant anything here until early June.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on January 13, 2011, 12:43:49 PM
Boom Boom, if I'm reading Vesey's right, they won't ship to you too soon, or at least they're not supposed to. No matter when you order, they send out their stuff by zone, no?

Toe, wherever you are, you can still do the socially responsible thing -- walk along laneways, scuff your toe in the earth here and there, plant some nastie seeds. :D There can't be a plant that gives so much for so little, eh? I wish I'd taken a photo of my nastie hedge last year -- overplant! overplant! it's worth it!
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on January 13, 2011, 12:52:05 PM
Boom Boom, if I'm reading Vesey's right, they won't ship to you too soon, or at least they're not supposed to. No matter when you order, they send out their stuff by zone, no?

They send all their stuff out by early May - it's on their order form - but we can't plant until the first week of June at the earliest.
 
ETA: oops - in my earlier post I said I was ordering in April - that's not right - I'm ordering in May.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on January 13, 2011, 01:00:51 PM
BB or skdadl, I don't know Vesey's site as well as you do, but so far I cannot find Scented Geraniums, on net and reasonably close all I can find is a book on them (http://www.richters.com/Web_store/web_store.cgi?product=XB7295&show=&prodclass=F209&cart_id=1832268.21183) from Richter's Herbs in Goodwood.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on January 13, 2011, 01:09:50 PM
Oh wait I found them in Brampton (http://www.gardencentre.com/Information/GardeningTips/GreenThumbGuides/Geraniums/tabid/126/Default.aspx) 
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on January 21, 2011, 04:53:44 PM
I can has nasturtium seeds already! Two bags full. Not sure these are enough, since I'm going to do another plot with them this year. Anyway, Vesey's is shipping seeds already, and these are great.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on April 02, 2011, 10:31:42 PM
Boom Boom, I'll switch threads if we're talking gardens, which we will be.

I'm still cleaning up, although I think planting here should be fairly close. Vesey's sent me my packages of nasturtium seeds back in January, I think, but dashed if I can remember what else I ordered from them. It's somewhere back there in my mis-filed email, I guess.

Have you got your orders in? I'm almost afraid to go to the site and see that everything else I want is already sold out. The flip happens very fast at that place. :(
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on April 02, 2011, 10:57:51 PM
I haven't ordered anything yet. I had the unfortunate experience of ordering late last year - our gardening season does not begin until June! - and just ordered whatever was left.
 
I guess I'll do the same this year, except for seeds - seeds are okay to order early. I want to order quite a lot of live plants, but there's no way I can hold them from now until June.
 
So, if Veseys is sold out, I'll look elsewhere - there's a lot of competitors to Veseys on the 'net.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on April 03, 2011, 09:07:47 AM
I thought this was interesting, and would like to see it more widespread:
 
The Montreal Community Gardens Program (Quebec) (http://www.alternatives.ca/en/content/ally/montreal-community-gardens-program-quebec)
 
excerpt:
 
Montréal’s community gardens program began in 1975. There are 97 community gardens. The boroughs have managed the program since the municipal reorganization in 2002. Eighteen boroughs offer plots of land to their citizens for gardening. In some boroughs, a gardening instructor visits the garden regularly to give advice to gardeners. Some boroughs offer adapted gardens for persons with reduced mobility. Materials provided include soil, a water source, tool shed or toolbox, tables, fences, sand, paint and flowers. Each community garden elects a volunteer committee to oversee administrative matters.
 
 
Here on the Lower North Shore, the social workers have organised community gardens for seniors in many communities, but not here in Kegaska, as almost all seniors here already have their own gardens.
 
 
 
 
 
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on April 03, 2011, 09:12:06 AM
This is interesting, too:
 
The Rooftop Gardens Project (Montréal)  (http://www.alternatives.ca/en/project-campaign/rooftop-gardens-project-montreal)

Since 2003, Alternatives has been promoting the recuperation of unused spaces such as rooftops, terraces and balconies for developing new productive green space. The goal is to create simple models of food production that are affordable, ecological, participative, and easily transferable to the global South as much as northern countries, so as to deal with increasing urbanization, pollution, and impoverishment of urban populations. It's a marriage between hydroponics, permaculture, organic agriculture, and community gardening.
 
Essentially we cultivate fruits and vegetables in containers of earth above water. This optimizes the growth of edible plants and ensures a constant flow of water and oxygen. The containers also serve to capture rain water, and their mobility and adaptability allow people to cultivate food in places where the soil has been contaminated.
 
 
 
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on April 03, 2011, 09:17:06 AM
  What is a Community Garden? (http://www.rccq.org/en/food-autonomy/community-gardens.html)
 
excerpt:
 
There are many different types of community gardens, because community gardening is adapted to the needs of the community in which it is practised. And since it is a relatively new phenomenon, the practice of community gardening is still in the process of defining itself.
  
 
 
 
La solidarité, la démocratie, l'équité et la justice sociale,
l'autonomie, la prise en charge, le respect de la personne : la dignité.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on April 03, 2011, 10:57:07 AM
Both rooftop gardens and community gardens are such good things, I think. My last place in Toronto had a fair-sized flat space up top, and I fantasized for a while about breaking through to it and doing a little garden there, even just grasses, but it would have meant too much reconstruction. Most conventional houses can't be easily converted, unfortunately.

The former architecture critic at the G&M wrote -- maybe fifteen years ago? -- about the garden he'd built on the flat top of the converted industrial building he lived in. It was really a beautiful thing, and relatively simple to do if you've got the right structure underneath ... which most of us don't.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on April 03, 2011, 12:05:30 PM
Rooftop gardens need to be planned with great care - not only the incredible weight of a garden, but also watering issues - where will the rooftop garden drain to?  And what about access, and by whom?
 
It can get very complicated.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on April 03, 2011, 04:16:41 PM
How long can I keep using seeds from previous years? I have radish, carrot, kale, rhubarb seeds that are getting on three years or more. I've kept them in cold storage. Anyone know?  :confused
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on April 03, 2011, 07:29:37 PM
How long can I keep using seeds from previous years? I have radish, carrot, kale, rhubarb seeds that are getting on three years or more. I've kept them in cold storage. Anyone know?  :confused

Cold storage and DRY? Because if there was no build up of moisture, your seeds should last you a few years at least. I'm glad I don't have to order anything, ev is perennial now and no more room, except for the nasturtium row I keep, I just pick up my nastie seeds at Zeller's or Dollar World.

If there is a chance of moisture for your seeds in future BB, you can add bit of silica gel to absorb any excess moisture.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on April 03, 2011, 07:58:50 PM
I kept them in original packaging, so maybe they're okay. I think I'll use them and see what happens.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: skdadl on April 03, 2011, 08:27:42 PM
Visited all the wee things today. Wonder of wonders, I think one bit of parsley has reseeded itself. I've only seen that once before, but there are the teensy green curls coming up. The chives and lavender and sage are ok, but I think they need rain.

The tulips in the herb patch (which pre-date me) are coming on gang-busters, but this year they definitely get lifted when they're done. Daffs are coming along nicely and other tulips show green, but they're not as big as the ones that are in the wrong place ... of course. There are a few crocii I'd forgotten, almost in flower except it was dull when I was out, so they were folded up. Wish I had some snowdrops.
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on April 03, 2011, 08:35:31 PM
 :applause Parsley. Today while walking in other places I saw a garden with daff have huge buds and will bloom by end of this week I think. That will be a sight to see, so I will make sure I stroll there by Friday. So much rain now, it is lovely to listen to. Think I'll sleep like a rock tonight, had a busy and enjoyable wknd. First one in awhile. *lovely*


Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on June 02, 2011, 04:19:03 PM
  Just finished planting the big veggie garden - in a very cold wind. I'm exhausted. The weeds were a killer. (http://rabble.ca/sites/all/modules/wysiwyg/tinymce/jscripts/tiny_mce/plugins/emotions/img/smiley-frown.gif)
 
Tomorrow - will plant a small greenhouse full of lettuce.
 
So far - have spent a week tilling and weeding by hand; a day for planting flowering bulbs and shrubs; and today's 10 hour effort.
 
I'm thinking of giving up the veggie garden and just plant shrubs, trees, and flowers there instead - and just sit back and enjoy the view. It's too much work for these old, arthritic bones. :geezer
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Herr Magoo on June 02, 2011, 04:40:10 PM
Look for things that self-seed.  Many of my herbs just come up on their own, no effort required.  And those that don't self-seed (eg: tomatoes) you can seed by scattering early in the spring & see what you get.
 
To me, gardens should not be about work, particularly of the stoop-labour variety.  Weeds have to be big enough to yank without bending over before I bother.  :)
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Toedancer on June 02, 2011, 06:15:33 PM
 :iagree Now that it's in BB, you can sit back and just weed what looks best for produce.

Oh and I think Vancouver is going to win the Cup!
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on June 02, 2011, 09:37:52 PM
Thanks for the encouragement! I have sore neck muscles, maybe a cold, from working in the cold wind today. Sleeping on a heating pad tonight!
Title: Garden planning 2013
Post by: Boom Boom on January 29, 2013, 10:38:03 AM
A bit early for the 2013 season, , but some things to consider: 

The Four Steps Required to Keep Monsanto OUT of Your Garden (http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/the-four-steps-required-to-keep-monsanto-out-of-your-garden/)
 
Keep Monsanto OUT of Your Veggie Patch (http://isearch.avg.com/search?cid={A2F21098-D1C0-4C71-BAFC-3AA65759E9E5}&mid=b3718cb9621e47d1966cd168dd3941b0-b2521549310c3b62d384eb2153f4e34badc27e4d&lang=en&ds=AVG&pr=pr&d=2011-12-21 14:41:32&v=9.0.0.21&sap=dsp&q=rabble.ca)
 
Monsanto-Free Seed Companies (http://www.occupymonsanto360.org/2012/03/06/monsanto-free-seed-companies/)
 
and:
 
Rachel Parent ~ GMOs Kids Right To Know – JUST LABEL IT! (http://www.thecanadiandaily.ca/rachel-parent-gmos-kids-right-to-know-just-label-it/)
 
In Canada, there is currently a private member’s bill C-257 introduced by NDP (recently had its first reading in Parliament) to require mandatory GMO labeling RIGHT HERE IN THIS COUNTRY. All Canadians need to show support for this Bill. We need an equivalent Prop 37 marketing campaign! Email Gerry Ritz, the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-food, to express your support of Bill C-257 at: gerry.ritz@parl.gc.ca
 
Sign the petition here: www.avaaz.org/en/petition/Bring_Mandatory_GMO_Labeling_To_Canada (http://www.avaaz.org/en/petition/Bring_Mandatory_GMO_Labeling_To_Canada)
 


 
 
Title: Re: Garden planning 2013
Post by: Boom Boom on January 29, 2013, 11:14:53 AM
  Monsanto-Free Seed Companies (http://www.occupymonsanto360.org/2012/03/06/monsanto-free-seed-companies/)
 
I notice VESEYS is not on this list - I've just emailed them to ask for an explanation. I may be changing suppliers if I don't like their reply.  (http://breadnroses.ca/community/Smileys/import/annoyed.gif)

 
 
Title: Re: Garden planning 2013
Post by: Boom Boom on February 03, 2013, 11:55:11 AM
  Monsanto-Free Seed Companies (http://www.occupymonsanto360.org/2012/03/06/monsanto-free-seed-companies/)
 
I notice VESEYS is not on this list - I've just emailed them to ask for an explanation. I may be changing suppliers if I don't like their reply.  (http://breadnroses.ca/community/Smileys/import/annoyed.gif)

Just saw this:
 
"To the best of our knowledge, Veseys Seeds Ltd. does not sell any flower or vegetable varieties which are genetically modified and we continue to encourage healthy gardening practices for all of our customers.

Veseys Seeds Ltd. is licensed as 'Shipper/Handler of Certified Organic Seed.' Veseys is certified by the CSI (Centre for Systems Integration) and meets all standards associated with the National Standard of Canada for Organic Agriculture CAN/CGSB-32.310-2006, having under gone the required physical inspection and review, assuring non use of chemical input or prohibitive substances in the shipping and handling of Certified Organic Seeds.

In the event that an organic product is not available, we will substitute with untreated seed of a similar variety, unless you specify that you do not want any substitutions."
http://www.veseys.com/ca/en/about/website/veseysgmopolicy (http://www.veseys.com/ca/en/about/website/veseysgmopolicy)
   (http://external.ak.fbcdn.net/safe_image.php?d=AQCmPR7JMQfhfSxF&w=90&h=90&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.veseys.com%2Fca%2Fen%2Fabout%2Fwebsite%2Fimages%2Felements%2Fheader-newsletter-contest-signup.png) (http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.veseys.com%2Fca%2Fen%2Fabout%2Fwebsite%2Fveseysgmopolicy&h=JAQH4sUYJAQFH98Ia6ohhd5SDEmbuUEeGkcBWOWjxWz0xzQ&s=1)   Veseys GMO Policy and Organic Certification - Veseys (http://www.veseys.com/ca/en/about/website/veseysgmopolicy) www.veseys.com (http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.veseys.com&h=gAQHX-TTIAQEg3PYYzDQsbN6U08yv3cRDcHOhuS5hcvbzFA&s=1)  To the best of our knowledge, Veseys Seeds Ltd. does not sell any flower or vegetable varieties which are genetically modified and we continue to encourage healthy gardening practices for all of our customers.  •  Veseys Seeds Ltd. is licensed as 'Shipper/Handler of Certified Organic Seed".
 
 
Title: Re: Garden planning
Post by: Boom Boom on May 29, 2013, 02:43:37 PM
Just counted 206 lillies poking through the soil, and hundreds of wildflowers of various kinds. With some warm weather and decent sunlight, probably those numbers will increase. I'm trying to find a source for milkweed in an attempt to bring butterflies back - I haven't seen any Monarchs (http://blogpestcontrol.com/2013/04/why-are-butterflies-disappearing/) in a long while.
 
ETA: Veseys has the Milkweed seeds  (https://www.veseys.com/ca/en/store/flowerseed/butterflyflower/carminerose#closed)- but the rooted plants are sold out. They are beautiful plants! Easy to grow.