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Smorgasbord => Chef's Corner => Topic started by: skdadl on October 09, 2006, 04:47:54 PM

Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on October 09, 2006, 04:47:54 PM
We did a thread like this once on babble, but I can't find it any more, and besides, I figure this is now seasonal.

You have had your harvest dinner. There will still be some fresh local foods available for a while, but winter is coming on and there will be days you don't want to go out to shop. Or can't. I'm sorry, but that is the hard truth.

We need stocks.

About this time of year, I start to remember what I can stand to eat out of tins on days that are just too mean to hike and schlep much through. I think right away of

-- tinned salmon, and some other fish-like critters
-- tinned baby beets
-- tinned corn is usually ok (or it would be if any corn were still ok)
-- some of the chunky soups and stews are worth checking out -- reject trans-fats


What else stores well?
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on October 09, 2006, 04:56:52 PM
sardines, and sprats (yum!) :cat

There is a kind of organic tinned beans, moreover without salt. It annoys me, because they are tinned in the US (Eden) but they are very well tinned. Obviously, l'idéal would be to soak and cook them, but...

artichoke hearts

priests
 
(that was just an anti-religious comment, to be a brat)... ;)
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Boom Boom on October 09, 2006, 04:59:32 PM
salmon!
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: brebis noire on October 09, 2006, 05:02:49 PM
stuffed grape leaves (dolmati?)
coeurs de palmier

...
hm, we're not strong on canned foods over here. I prefer frozen, or dried stuff. Canned food seems short on flavour.
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on October 09, 2006, 05:02:54 PM
Priests in tins?!?   :shock:

I have seen a few priests who were in their cups, as we say, but I've never seen one in a tin.  :D
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: fern hill on October 09, 2006, 05:04:09 PM
Pumpkin for pies. Tomatoes for sauces, though my mother served heated canned tomatoes as a soup. Habitant pea soup. Tuna.
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: sparqui on October 09, 2006, 05:04:26 PM
artichokes, heart of palm, chick peas and smoked mussels
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: kuri on October 09, 2006, 05:07:46 PM
Olives.  :eat
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Herr Magoo on October 09, 2006, 05:09:22 PM
I keep mucho cans of coconut milk and various curry pastes (Red, Green, Yellow, Mussaman, Panang, Sour, etc.).  

For non-fresh veggies, we prefer frozen.  Apparently they keep just about as many vitamins as fresh, and I'll be honest here:  they kind of remind me of childhood somehow, so I like them.  Peas, corn and mixed are our favourites.

We also like to have handy a few cans of crab meat, for crabbycakes, and various soups for when the urge hits us.  We have plenty of interesting Thai soups, available at Dominion, in various flavours.  They're quite good, all of them, but we overate them when we first discovered them, and now we don't crave them so much.

And of course baked beans in a can.  Handy when you don't know what else to serve with scrambled eggs, and also good for our perennial desperation meal of wieners and beans.  We like to add an onion, so it seems more like a regional specialty, and less like a low-rent campground lunch.  Shut up!  We like it.  :)

Finally, tuna.  Mrs. M. eats it for lunch, and occasionally we have tuna sandwiches for dinner.  Again, an homage to childhood.
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on October 09, 2006, 05:14:20 PM
Italian plum tomatoes do really well in tins, don't they. Short of fresh ones, I think those are absolutely the best cooking tomatoes.

And I need tinned chick peas for hummus, although I seem to need dried ones (soaked overnight) for the falafels. I've never been able to make that dinner work the other way 'round.

We don't seem to have much luck with (commercial) frozen foods here. They seem to get all shrivelly to me. A lot of foods are horrible in tins, but most of the frozen stuff I've tried is bad too.

Worst experiment in tinning a food I've ever encountered: tinned asparagus. P-U!   :shock:
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: sparqui on October 09, 2006, 05:15:05 PM
crab meat and stuffed grape leaves -- those are also nice to have around
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on October 09, 2006, 05:18:13 PM
tinned asparagus is mushy, but it is good in frittata or quiche/flan.

There are also nice things in jars. Far more in France than here, such as confit de canard, and a very nice duck pâté (with no pork, just duck). And julienned celeriac salad - from France or from Eastern Europe. Nice pickled salads from Central and Eastern Europe.

In Europe, one finds a nice range of tinned sausages - the kind that are a bit like hot dogs but nicer. Including kosker or halal ones without pork.

Of course if you are nice to anne, she jars her own salmon...
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: sparqui on October 09, 2006, 05:37:04 PM
I love white asparagus spears in jars -- hard to find those around here though.
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on October 09, 2006, 05:50:52 PM
There's a kind of miniature pea -- petit pois -- that comes in a silver tin without a paper label, stamped "Le Sieur," I think, that is very nice as a garnish.

Like all tinned peas, they are mushy, but they are very tiny and sweet.

Mainly, I eat green peas raw in summer, don't much like them any other way. I will sometimes make a purée out of a bag of frozen ones (melted in minimal amount of stock), then toss in a tin of the miniatures whole, and season with cinnamon and mint. (Add cream if you're wicked.)
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: gunnar gunnarson on October 09, 2006, 07:55:48 PM
Quote from: skdadl
Priests in tins?!?   :shock:

I have seen a few priests who were in their cups, as we say, but I've never seen one in a tin.  :D


Is it OK to eat them on Friday?
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: k'in on October 09, 2006, 08:49:06 PM
Sure.  But most prefer to eat their priests deep-fried with a side order of chips on Friday.  Canned priest comes in handy for sandwiches and "surprise" style casseroles...
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: gunnar gunnarson on October 09, 2006, 08:56:15 PM
Again with the trayfe.  Why do I even ask?
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on October 09, 2006, 09:22:00 PM
But tinned priest is only treif if it includes the hindquarters, or if the flesh was torn.

However, it is not the most standard Sukkot fare. Happy Sukkot!  (I'm a diehard atheist, but I'll celebrate anything as long as I don't have to fast...).
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: k'in on October 09, 2006, 09:30:59 PM
sorry-I meant to say that most "Catholics" prefer their priests deep fried on Fridays.  In that case, it's more about the texture I suppose and unidentifiable "jazz-fish" will do in a pinch.  It's possible for "priest-in-a-tin" to be non-traife, no?
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on November 07, 2006, 04:32:47 PM
Most authorities don't consider human flesh to be kosher, but there seems to be quite a bit of discussion about this issue!
http://everything2.com/index.pl?node_id=671778 (http://everything2.com/index.pl?node_id=671778)

I'm making chicken sofrito - a Spanish name but in this case a Sephardic recipe - though Muslims and Christians in the Middle East use the same basic technique - cooking a chicken or some other unfortunate critter in a small amount of olive oil and lemon or other citrus, with spices such as cardomom, or saffron if you are feeling flush. Stewed at a low heat for quite a while (though I have a rather small chicken so it should be done in an hour or two)... One of those recipes one can do while working at the other end of the house.
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Mandos on November 07, 2006, 04:40:31 PM
Lagatta, that's amazing.  Thank you.
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on November 07, 2006, 04:55:11 PM
The debate on human flesh or the chicken sofrito?

Obviously the flesh debate is simply academic except as relates to the commandment to disobey religious law to save a human life. Doesn't something similar exist in Islam - thinking (foggy memory) of the travellers' sura?

As for the sofrito, a Moroccan friend (of Arab-Muslim background, though not religious) also makes it with paprika.
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Nikita on November 07, 2006, 05:11:53 PM
I really like most tinned beans, except lima beans.  Definintely not a fan of lima beans.  Canned tomatoes are good too, nice with a sprinkle of salt and pepper.  I saw canned potatoes the other day, and unless I was stocking a bomb shelter I don't think I'll be trying those any time soon.

I have a recipe I "invented" when I was rilly poor.  I don't know if it would qualify as stew or chili, but it hits the spot when you're hungry and I think it's pretty healthy.  :)

Dump one can of each of the following into a large pot:
black beans
kidney beans
pinto beans
chickpeas
corn
crushed tomatoes (one large or two medium)
lentils
Add 1 tablespoon chili powder, 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed, 1 teaspoons of each: dried oregano, dried thyme, cayenne, paprika, freshly ground black pepper, mustard powder, and garlic powder (or fresh), one or two bay leaves, 1/2 cup beef stock (if you like a bit of meat taste), and two cooled and cubed baked potatoes.  You can salt if you like, but I have never added salt.  This makes a lot of stew/chili, and it freezes well and goes a long way.
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: deBeauxOs on November 07, 2006, 05:20:07 PM
Skim evaporated milk.  I always keep a tin handy in the pantry.  I have one in the refrigerator at the moment that I am using up as I make chai.  A friend who lived in Ladakh for a few months gave me this recipe.  

Boil two-three cups of water in a pot (I use stainless steel, ceramic-clad iron such Le Creuset would be fine too).  Throw in a few slices of fresh ginger, slivered (or candied with the sugar scraped off). Take 4-5 pods of cardamon and crush in a pestle, add to hot simmering water.  At this point, you may add other spices to your taste - nutmeg and cinnamon, for example - then some loose black tea.  (I use two bags of Celestial Seasoning's Bengal Tiger and one Constant Comment Decaf bag.)  Let it steep, add 1 quarter to half a cup of evaporated milk, warm it up and serve.  My friend says that evaporated milk tastes a bit like the (non-dairy) milk available in Ladakh thus most expats use it as a substitute when the real thing is not available.
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Nikita on November 07, 2006, 05:23:58 PM
That sounds delicious deBeauxOs!  I bought a box of "Chai tea" bags (holy redundancy Batman!) a while ago and was bitterly disappointed.  It was very, very bland.
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on November 07, 2006, 05:27:19 PM
When tomatoes are not in season, then the tinned Italian (plum) tomatoes are absolutely the best to cook with -- but then tomatoes are not, I think, technically a vegetable.

Beans do well in tins and are ideal that way in some recipes, although if you want a falafel that hangs together, tinned chick peas will be too mushy.

Nikita, that looks like a great invention to me. I will bring you a cornbread or polenta recipe to serve with it tomorrow.
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: deBeauxOs on November 07, 2006, 05:29:40 PM
The fresh ginger really makes a difference, even a not-so-juicy piece left over in the fridge and forgotten from your last stir-fry.  Crushing the cardamon - I got that from listening to an interview with Deepa Mehta - she cracks the pods with her teeth, I would rather not.   :shock:

Ooops, I forgot a step - what with all that yummy stuff floating around in the tea, you may want to strain it as you're pouring it into cups or mugs.   :wink:
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on June 11, 2007, 06:49:44 PM
I bought a HUGE tin of artichokes, as someone convinced me it is good for arthritis. Oh well, it can't hurt (they have been transferred into two glass refrigerator storage containers).
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Croghan27 on June 11, 2007, 07:27:09 PM
Quote from: lagatta
I bought a HUGE tin of artichokes.


Not long ago we had a bit of a thread on John Wyndham's The Day of the Triffids (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Day_of_the_Triffids). About that time, no doubt to cash in on the idea, I recall a book that replaced the 'triffids' with artichokes.

lagatta, please, please do not sleep in the same room as the open tin.  :shock: And if your little kitty does the missing thing, listen for the sound of artichokes burping.
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on June 12, 2007, 08:21:05 AM
I don't keep them in the tin - they are safely esconced in glass refrigerator storage containers - who knew they were cannibalistic plants?

Managed to get down an omelette made with some of them and one egg - just sort of holding together. And three apricots. I wasn't hungry at all, but if I'm to go cycling, had to have some solid food in my tummy.
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: deBeauxOs on June 12, 2007, 10:28:21 AM
lagatta, you can add some puréed artichokes to hummous or guacamole too.
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on June 12, 2007, 02:10:37 PM
Thanks, yes, I've had that. Would also be good in a spread based on soft cheese (of I kind I can eat).
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: shaolin on June 16, 2007, 04:01:25 PM
I just had half a tin of artichoke hearts go moldy in the fridge (they had been transferred to a plastic container.  My mom and grandma are visiting so I have been doing the opposite of eating out of tins.  

Last night we went to this (http://www.davidbann.com/) restaurant.  I had the Thai fritters, the baby potato salad and the smoked tofu with udon noodles.  A significant other has just started working there so I am looking forward to discounted meals in the future...
Title: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on June 16, 2007, 07:01:04 PM
shaolin, that place sounds utterly lovely. I confess I don't think of quality vegetarian food in Scotland. This site has been sent to a Scot here who is vegetarian; he returns there when he can as his parents are ailing.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on September 18, 2008, 07:31:15 PM
Notice break in time in this thread.

I don't mean to be depressing, but as our nights have cooled down lately, I've been thinking that maybe I need to drag back some staples for the pantry, since it's a lot easier to drag them back in semi-tropical weather than it will be through feet of snow.

It's a problem if you don't have a car, since tinned food is really heavy, and yet you can use it up so quickly. How do you make it through winter without an entire flat or three of diced tomatoes, eg?

So anyway, since I didn't have any other pressing needs today, I did a run for tins. Build pantry; winter's coming on.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on September 18, 2008, 08:05:34 PM
I actually have quite a bit of stuff now; I have two bags on my bicycle so it isn't hard to cart stuff on sale home.

I've also been sprouting mung beans, so I guess I should get a few bags of organic ones home, as they make a nice fresh thing to eat even in the dead of winter.

The problem is where to put anything else - I just have a metal pantry cabinet, and a row of the installed kitchen cabinets I use for food storage rather than dishes and cooking vessels.

skdadl, remember that "ethnic" shops can be cheaper for a great many staples than chain supermarkets, but you have to know your way around them.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: k'in on September 19, 2008, 10:54:06 AM
Woke up with a craving for pumpkin muffins.  I'll be using canned pumpkin because a) I'm too lazy to mangle and cook a real pumpkin and b) a real pumpkin is going to be harder to lug home than a tin.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on September 19, 2008, 10:57:47 AM
Pumpkin -- that's good. The real pumpkin -- ie, not prepared filling with all sorts of other stuff in it but just real pumpkin -- does well in tins.

Funny that no one is tinning squash or the other cucurbitaceae.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on September 19, 2008, 11:02:57 AM
Two good sources for tins etc in Montréal:

Segalls, on St-Laurent corner Duluth - also known by some as "the stinky store". The tins are fine, and the frozen stuff has a huge turnover (they have a lot of fish and seafood - the Portuguese people in that neighbourhood snap it up). Lots of tins etc of organic/natural stuff (students at McGill, UQAM, Cégep du Vieux-Montréal are keen on that, as are others).

Mondiana, Bélanger corner Christophe-Colomb (a few streets east of Jean-Talon Market) a similar shop that opened up around here - owners an Arab couple - he Syrian, she Moroccan so they have a lot of tinned, jarred and bagged stuff from the Middle East (including Turkey) and the Maghreb, which I love. Yummy jarred Turkish vegetable spreads and winter salads.

Other than Mediterranean shops and chains, I've found interesting stuff at Central and Eastern European shops. Good sauerkraut (mild, the best is cooked in white wine...) is a surprisingly pleasant thing to eat on cold days, in many ways, and it is extremely nutritious - a good winter source of vitamin C.

k'in, I think tinned pumpkin is fine in baking. You can always use frozen squash - that would be lighter to carry still. I don't do sweet baking; I'm wondering if a squash or pumpkin bread would be nice? I've used frozen squash in gratins etc - it is fine.

I do have a buttercup squash I'll be cooking today or tomorrow, as I'm also making turkey/onion/olive empanadas for a group, so the oven will be on anyway.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: deBeauxOs on September 19, 2008, 01:13:04 PM
Quote from: k'in
Woke up with a craving for pumpkin muffins.  I'll be using canned pumpkin because a) I'm too lazy to mangle and cook a real pumpkin and b) a real pumpkin is going to be harder to lug home than a tin.

What a good idea.  I always have one small tin of pumpkin on hand because it is a great thing to mix in with soft cat food if my kitty is having tummy issues.  But I should use up the one I've stored for a year now and get a fresh one, so pumpkin/corn meal muffins it is!
Title: Re:
Post by: arborman on September 19, 2008, 04:58:54 PM
Quote from: skdadl
When tomatoes are not in season, then the tinned Italian (plum) tomatoes are absolutely the best to cook with -- but then tomatoes are not, I think, technically a vegetable.

 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomato)
Quote
The U.S. Supreme Court[/url]settled the controversy in 1893 by declaring that the tomato is a vegetable, based on the popular definition that classifies vegetables by use, that they are generally served with dinner and not dessert (Nix v. Hedden (149 U.S. 304)).[14] The holding of the case applies only to the interpretation of the Tariff Act of March 3, 1883, and the court did not purport to reclassify the tomato for botanical or other purposes other than paying a tax under a tariff act.

It is technically a berry that grows on a vine, but for tax purposes in the US it is a vegetable.

Quote
Due to the scientific definition of a fruit, the tomato remains a fruit when not dealing with US tariffs. Nor is it the only culinary vegetable that is a botanical fruit: eggplants, cucumbers, and squashes of all kinds (such as zucchini and pumpkins) share the same ambiguity.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: 'lance on September 19, 2008, 05:03:21 PM
Yeah, "vegetable" is a culinary and not a botanical category.

Botanically, even a mushroom is a fruit, or rather a "fruiting body."
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on September 19, 2008, 06:25:14 PM
On the topic of tins: cat food around the world (http://www.messybeast.com/catfoods.htm)

It has its problems though. The author has confused the spicy areas of Latin America with Spain - Spanish food is not usually very hot and spicy. And Italian cats now have plentiful access to tinned and dry food.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on September 19, 2008, 07:46:39 PM
In my experience, cats like birds. In real life, cats do not catch fish; they do not catch cows; they do not catch sheep. They catch birds.

Therefore, my cats eat bird. Tinned bird.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on September 19, 2008, 08:15:16 PM
No tinned mouse?
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on September 19, 2008, 08:26:18 PM
I have seen cats catch and kill mouses and squirrels, but I have never seen them eat them.

I think the reaction to many small things, like mouses and squirrels, is nervous system, and maybe if they were starving, they would eat the mouses. But I've never seen that. They will eat bird, though.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Gigi on September 19, 2008, 09:52:39 PM
One thing that is NOT good in tins: canned ham.  YUCK.

(Not the spam-type stuff - and actual canned ham.  I have no idea how you are to cook it, but it was pretty inedible heated in the oven.)
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on September 20, 2008, 07:02:51 AM
Hmmn. Are you talking about those sort-of triangular-shaped tins, Gigi? (Rounded corners, but three-sided?) I used to quite like those, although I never cooked them: I just opened and sliced and served as cold cuts. It has been a while since I bought one, and in my memory the widely available ones are Maple Leaf, so I don't think I'm going there for a while.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on October 29, 2008, 08:49:23 AM
Here are some rather fancy tins from a little bistro in Verdun - they actually tin some of their own dishes!

Obviously too pricy for everyday staples, but actually I don't find the prices out of line for the type of product, and like that they are local. If ever I'm in Verdun I'll pick up a tin of the pot-au-feu with red deer. Sounds like a nice comfort on a foul winter day, that. http://www.lenakedlunch.com/eng/shop.html (http://www.lenakedlunch.com/eng/shop.html)

Not to non-MontréalaisEs - Verdun is southwesterly; me (Jean-Talon Market area), northeastery. But I do sometimes have cause to go there, and this place is very close to a métro station.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: deBeauxOs on October 29, 2008, 09:54:11 AM
sparqui - go look!  The chef has recreated (http://www.lenakedlunch.com/babette/babetteFR.html) in minute details, and with some Canadian ingredients, 'Le festin de Babette' (http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Le_Festin_de_Babette)!!

En anglais, Babette's Feast (http://www.press.uchicago.edu/Misc/Chicago/243230.html).
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on December 12, 2008, 04:01:32 PM
I don't know whether baconnaise - and baconnaise lite (!!!!!)  :shock:  :shock:  :shock: can be considered something ok in a jar (no tin), but I simply had to post this somewhere.

Moreover, it is vegetarian - and kosher :mrgreen:

http://lagourmandemodeste.wordpress.com ... -le-bacon/ (http://lagourmandemodeste.wordpress.com/2008/10/30/obsedee-par-le-bacon/)
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: deBeauxOs on December 13, 2008, 01:28:39 PM
:rotfl:  Next time I'm in the US, I'll keep an eye open for that product.  As long as it doesn't contain GMO canola oil, it would make me happy.  Imagine it slathered on toasted tomato sandwiches.  Yum!
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on December 13, 2008, 03:14:32 PM
You could of course opt for a slice of artesanal back bacon from the Byward Market, though I guess that wouldn't have the fake-food factor.

The tins of fattening-up catfood (a/d) cost $2,49 each. Cripes, it would be cheaper to feed him human pâté.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: deBeauxOs on December 13, 2008, 05:21:38 PM
Quote from: lagatta
You could of course opt for a slice of artesanal back bacon from the Byward Market, though I guess that wouldn't have the fake-food factor. ...
Nor the clean-up of the greasy mess.  Once in awhile I indulge my taste buds with a few smoked turkey kielbasa slices from the Sausage Kitchen.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on December 09, 2009, 10:37:46 PM
I see I'd already mentioned the jarred Turkish (and Balkan) vegetable spreads, avjar and pindjur. Had some pindjur tonight - it is almost like a fine-cut ratatouille though more peppers. Ingredients: peppers, onions, tomatoes, eggplants, sunflower oil, salt, sugar (there is not a lot of salt or of sugar) hot peppers/chillis, parsley, vinegar, garlic. It is nice on bread or as a dip.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Antonia on December 09, 2009, 11:32:26 PM
I love the organic soups from Wolfgang Puck.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on December 10, 2009, 06:57:43 AM
Where do you find them, Antonia?

Amy's organic lentil soup is most tasty, if a bit mushy. (Here I am, giving other people my lentil soup/stew recipe and then eating out of a tin m'self.) For some reason Mr Case, which doesn't actually stock that much decent food apart from tinned fish, sells cases of Amy's, so when I ordered mass quantities of kitty litter and nibbles last time, I also got a carton of Amy's as winter emergency back-up. It's really great with some chopped fresh tomato added.

I know Pindjur as the people who make my favourite red pepper preserve, moderately spiced, much better on burgers than the standard red relish.

Real soup is wonderful, but it takes some planning.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: steffie on December 10, 2009, 07:26:32 AM
Real soup takes planning, yes, but also one must do something with all that soup!  I have found some great Ziploc twist-cap plastic containers for storing/freezing soups and stews.  I'm planning to have more of Skdadl's Lentil Soup/Stew this weekend.  YUM!
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on December 10, 2009, 07:33:23 AM
Hi, steffie. The secret ingredient is what makes that soup, eh?  ;)
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: steffie on December 10, 2009, 07:34:09 AM
Bacon?
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on December 10, 2009, 07:39:31 AM
skdadl, I picked up some of the Wolfgang Puck soups at Loblaws. Moreover they were on sale. They were located in the "organic and natural" department, not the soup aisle. Strangely, I've also seen them at Pharmaprix (Shoppers' Drug Mart).

Yes he does have that cutesy name, imagining a Mozartian setting of a Willy comedy "Ein Sommernachtstraum", but his soup is good. http://www.wolfgangpucksoup.com/ (http://www.wolfgangpucksoup.com/) This is a US site and I have only seen a few of the soups here.

Loblaws also sells organic broth in tetra-paks. Oh, homemade is still better, but it does contain a lot less crap than soup aisle tetra-pak broth. I did buy one pak of beef broth as organic beef bones are hard to come by, and it is good for making a pseudo-Asian soup, with vegetables and soba (buckwheat) noodles.

steffie, my small crockpot only produces a very reasonable quantity of broth - I'd just as soon make it more often as the crockpot uses very little energy. My fridge is tiny so not much storage space.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Boom Boom on December 10, 2009, 11:05:39 AM
I cooked a ham last week, froze what I didn't need. I heated a bit of it in the oven for lunch along with a small pot of canned beans (in molasses! yummy). We have a fierce storm raging, so I wanted something I can eat if the power goes out. My oven is still warm so I'm keeping the ham there and the beans on top of the stove. If the power goes out, I'll have warm food at least. And I have a pot of water resting on top of the furnace so I'll have warm water for tea. So far the power and my ISP are working fine, but the storm is just getting started. :annoyed:
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on December 10, 2009, 12:34:09 PM
Hope you're snug and safe, Boom Boom.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Boom Boom on December 10, 2009, 12:50:59 PM
I closed all the curtains and blinds, turned on all the lights, got the furnace going, put on some hippity-hop, and pretended that I was in Florida. That didn't last long.  :lol:
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Antonia on December 10, 2009, 05:27:52 PM
Many supermarkets carry WP soups, although not a wide selection.

I just came back from the Big Carrot where I stocked up on 20 tins of the French Onion soup which is hard to find.

What I do is, I nuke a whole onion, thinly sliced, until it's soft-cooked.
Then I add the soup and heat it up.
Meanwhile I toast two pieces of great (whole grain) bread.
Then I put the bread on top of the soup and add some cheese (I am using low-fat provolone right now) and voila!
Easy meal in a bowl.

I also like the chicken and wild rice soup which I turn into Greek avgolemeno but heartier.
I nuke some julienned carrots and broccoli slaw.
Add the soup until hot.
Meanwhile I wisk egg whites (from a carton) -- or two whole eggs (am supposed to cut back on cholesterol though) -- with a lot of lemon juice (from a bottle).
Then I slowly ladle the hot soup into the egg-lemon mixture so as to warm it up and not cook it.
Then when the eggs are pretty hot, I pour them back into the (large) soup bowl (actually a serving bowl) and nuke again.
Top with some grated parm.

I did that for my mother not long ago and her jaw dropped she was so impressed at how good and how homemade just like mom's it tasted.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on December 10, 2009, 05:40:28 PM
Antonia, you might want to try duck eggs, though perhaps you'd like to consult your physician or a nutritionist. It seems that, like duck fat, they are "good" cholesterol, not bad. But they are big - I avoid too many eggs too, though I love them, and I'm having a hard time eating my way through 6 duck eggs. I duck egg equals 2 hen eggs.

I would like to find the onion soup. It isn't hard at all to make but it takes quite a while. I may check one of the larger natural foods shops. There is a very big one with some fancy tins and jars just opposite McGill University, on Sherbrooke but I forget which corner it is: perhaps Union.

Love avgolemeno. Yes, I add extra veg to just about any tinned soup; for one thing it cuts the salt. Spinach frozen in little turds is handy too (hope that wasn't TMI but we always call them "petites crottes").

My favourite onion soup for a group involves a bottle of McAuslan St-Ambroise Oatmeal Stout. (better than Guinness).
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: deBeauxOs on December 10, 2009, 06:52:33 PM
There is an imported beer with a smoky taste that is lovely to use when making Carbonade de boeuf à la flamande (http://www.soscuisine.com/fr/recettes/consulter/carbonade-a-la-flamande?sos_l=fr).  It's available in LCBOs.  Tinned beef broth or good quality concentrated veggie stock in a jar may be used in lieu of beer.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Boom Boom on December 10, 2009, 06:59:16 PM
Speaking of food, I just watched Julie and Julia. It was great!
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Antonia on December 11, 2009, 03:13:18 PM
Re. the onion soup.

I forgot to mention that I always add a shot of dry sherry. I keep a cheap Canadian bottle in my pantry for cooking.

ETA: I just made it for the first time in months. When you nuke the onions in the same bowl you will eventually nuke the soup in, pour the sherry in then. Gives the onions more flavour.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on December 11, 2009, 06:09:08 PM
That's a good idea, especially now that we can't get Chinese cooking wine. I like to add a bit at the end to certain stir-fries.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on December 11, 2009, 06:50:15 PM
I probably mentioned this some earlier year in this thread, but they're so good it's worth a repeat: PC cherry tomatoes in tins. They'll spark up just about anything on a winter's night, and they still have some pop in them, although the jackets are usually part open from the tinning.

PC stuff turns up in lots of stores that aren't Loblaws, yes/no? I'm hoping I can find some cherry toms tomorrow at the No Frills (although that is Loblaws, of a kind), which is a bit of a trek for me, but we need restocking here.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Antonia on December 11, 2009, 09:02:23 PM
PC shows up at Maxi in Montreal, as well as Loblaws. I don't think there are No Frills there.

By the way, I have fallen in love with Sobey's/IGA, and their Compliments products. I have a small -- but with just about everything you need and fab produce -- IGA within walking distance that delivers. It's 24/7. And a couple of great big beautiful Sobey's within a 10 min drive.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Toedancer on December 12, 2009, 02:36:21 AM
Pork n Beans
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Antonia on December 12, 2009, 02:54:58 PM
Well I don't eat pork but I love the deep browned beans from Heinz.

Also Amy's organic chili, with tofu. Tastes just like chopped beef. Stagg's 4-bean vegetarian chili is good too, but I find the sodium count outrageous.

Hearts of palm. Artichoke hearts. Always canned.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on December 12, 2009, 06:19:18 PM
Yes, overall I prefer the Compliments products to PC (fewer weird overprocessed things) but PC does have some very good products too. The PC banners here (if I'm not missing any) are Maxi, Loblaws, Provigo and Intermarché. Maxi is sort of the equivalent of No Frills, but not quite as "no frills" looking, and Intermarché is a banner of small supermarkets, that tend to be a little more expensive for non-food staples, but many are located in what is referred to as "ethnic" markets (not old-stock francophone or anglophone). They have special flyer pages for these and sometimes very good buys on produce, cheeses, olive oil and what have you.

I didn't buy that Stagg vegetable chili precisely because I read the sodium on it. I find most browned beans of the pork'n or porkless variety too high in sugar.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on December 12, 2009, 07:11:53 PM
I've actually begun to worry that I'm not getting enough salt, or at least not enough iodized salt, since I almost never add it to anything I cook from raw and what I do add is sea salt, very low in iodine, so I've stopped worrying about the odd "processed" product, where I'm pretty sure I can count on a day's worth of iodine. Who wants goitre?
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on December 12, 2009, 08:21:34 PM
Another good source for iodine is seaweed. I've been neglecting it of late, and a bit is very good for the health and tasty as well. The most indigenous one is dulse - very popular along the Atlantic seacoast, in the Gaspé, the Maritimes, Newfoundland... excellent in fish chowders. And the feathery Japanese kinds in Asian noodle dishes.

No, one certainly doesn't want goitre - not merely unsightly but related to what used to be called cretinism.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on December 19, 2009, 08:03:53 PM
Did someone above mention Stagg's chili? I just had some. I was most pleasantly surprised. It's very good. I'm used to very highly spiced food, and for a tinned commercial product, Stagg's is pretty brave, I'd say -- not ultra-hot, but respectable on the hot scale. And the meat is identifiable as meat, and edible. I give it a 7.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on January 04, 2010, 04:00:42 PM
Y'know how so many things taste like chicken? I have discovered something that does not taste like chicken -- tinned chicken. I bought some as an experiment, and gah, but it is awful. I mean, tinned tuna doesn't exactly taste like tuna, but it tastes like tinned tuna, and that's good. Tinned salmon doesn't exactly taste like salmon, but it tastes like tinned salmon, and that's good. Tinned chicken tastes like ... I dunno -- very bad tinned tuna? Without the tuna flavour? It just bears no relation to chicken at all.

Maybe it's the texture, which is definitely not chickenish. The virtue of chicken is that pillowy effect, and this is more like tuna texture -- or maybe catfood. It is also heavily salted.

I just fed the extra tin to the five cats who eat tinned food, and they all liked it. I brought the little leftover to Gracie, who won't eat tinned food except it turns out that she adores tinned tuna. Gracie wouldn't touch the tinned chicken. So now Guinny and Phillie are having seconds from Gracie's plate, and my office smells like ... well, not like chicken.

Tinned chicken: FAIL.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Croghan27 on January 04, 2010, 04:17:52 PM
Frog's legs do definitely taste like chicken.

The problem is that frogs are not as ...substantial as the feathered cluckers ..... so do not be hungry if you order them.

There is quite a story about the time I experimented ordering frog's legs ..... my guest was a work mate who was of Armenian extraction ... he was born in Egypt where his family fled to escape the pogroms by the Turks. Would you not know it, our matre'de was ... (you guessed it) Turkish. Even without speaking you could feel the electricity in the air ... (I got to know the matre'de sometime later and he was actually a nice fellow - worked for the food bank and all...)
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: deBeauxOs on January 04, 2010, 04:53:49 PM
Isn't sodium/salt-laden food toxic for cats?  I always assumed so.

ETA: This is a good list of human food items poisonous for feline companions (http://www.cat-world.com.au/human-foods-which-are-poisonous-to-cats).  Some of them I didn't know, but I never let my food out where my cat could eat it.

I've also read that the sugar substitute Xylitol is quite harmful to dogs.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on January 04, 2010, 06:21:41 PM
I'm sure that a steady diet of salted foods would not be a good idea for cats. As we've all often agreed before, anything that can cause the formation of crystals in the bladder, especially of males (whose urethras are very narrow and can become blocked), is dangerous as a steady diet, and that would especially mean fish of any kind. Still, many of us occasionally give our cats bits of tinned tuna (which seems to be universally loved) or chicken -- as a treat, that seems safe.

A lot of catfood is fish-based, and a lot of people feed it to their cats. My vet banned it (along with most commercial dry food) totally years ago, when Redcliff almost died of cystitis, so I'm very careful about their basic diets. In my experience (and that's a lot of cats), most cats don't actually want to eat stuff that isn't good for them. They mostly don't care about milk, eg. They know water is good for them, so they drink a lot of water.  And so on. The only two cats I've had over the last thirty years who've been really keen on human food have been Oyster (see avatar) and Minnie, who can make it very difficult for us to sit down to dinner unless she's shut away in her room. Minnie is omnivorous -- she also like vegetables. She wants to eat anything I eat. But nobody else is even interested, unless it's fresh chicken or tinned tuna. And I think that's the most common state of affairs. I've never met a cat who was interested in chocolate or caffeine or alcohol. I mean, they're not dogs, eh?

Oh -- some of them like runny eggs. As brebis noire says, it's the water that matters most, and then teh balanced diet of approved cat foods.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Toedancer on January 04, 2010, 06:43:12 PM
My cat wants his canned food at room temp., which is a bugger if you've got 2 already opened, covered tins in fridge. So since they like variety, I open at least 2. But he still doesn't like it from the fridge, goes to the wire basket I keep his tins in and howls for them. What to do?

I was told I must remove the leftover wet food from tins and place in a glass jar, because pop-top cans, by-products, and fish flavors of canned cat food have been linked to the development of thyroid disease in cats.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: skdadl on January 04, 2010, 06:50:45 PM
Heh. I see your problem, Toe, but with five guys sharing one tin each time, that doesn't happen here. I do have gazillions of tins to recycle, though, which I go soon to organize.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: deBeauxOs on January 04, 2010, 07:16:52 PM
Quote from: Toedancer
My cat wants his canned food at room temp., which is a bugger if you've got 2 already opened, covered tins in fridge. ...
My cat is very finicky.  What seems to make tinned food appealing to her - she has 5 teeth left - is to add some broth, turkey or chicken.  I make about 2-3 cups of it and freeze it in ice cube trays, when ready pop them all into a ziplock for that purpose.

Twice a day, I take one broth cube, set in fruit nappy size bowl, cover, microwave for 36 secs. Then I add two heaping glops from her KD tin, mush it around, let it come to room temp, serve.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: brebis noire on January 04, 2010, 09:00:58 PM
Yes, I've noticed my cats prefer warm food, though they won't go as far as refusing food from the fridge. They are very grateful to be getting tinned food at this stage in their lives.
Adding warm broth (not too salty maybe?) is a good idea. Even quicker though, when I feel like pampering them a bit, I add some boiling water to the cold tinned food and mix well so that it's lukewarm.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: deBeauxOs on January 04, 2010, 10:08:41 PM
Quote from: brebis noire
Adding warm broth (not too salty maybe?) is a good idea.
Yes, I make it from scratch (eh) with turkey legs and backs that I get from the butcher, usually inexpensive since they charge a lot for the breasts.  No salt, no spices.  And I skim the fat off.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on April 15, 2012, 09:47:37 AM
Some more tinned fish recipes from Hugh Fearnly-Whittingstall in the Guardian, with notes on sustainable species and catches - however the sourches indicated are, obviously, British and continental European, and here it would be more sustainable to seek out Canadian sources if possible:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2012/apr/13/tinned-fish-recipes-sardines-anchovies
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Antonia on April 15, 2012, 10:11:45 AM
I discussed this with Sylvia Earle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sylvia_Earlehttp://), and she said these are not sustainable. It's because of the food chain.
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: lagatta on April 15, 2012, 11:59:54 AM
Soon we won't be able to eat anything, eh?
Title: Re: Food that is ok in tins
Post by: Antonia on April 16, 2012, 12:28:44 AM
Nuts and beans. Fruit. Grains. Veg.