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Smorgasbord => Gardens => Topic started by: Boom Boom on June 13, 2006, 11:10:28 AM

Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on June 13, 2006, 11:10:28 AM
I hope members will feel free post a link to photos of their gardens. I won't have my own place until next month, so in the meantime here are links to the surrounding plants of the Lower North Shore where I've lived since 1995:

rocky moss: http://i5.tinypic.com/14aaivt.jpg (http://i5.tinypic.com/14aaivt.jpg)

dwarf conifer in rock: http://i5.tinypic.com/14aamc1.jpg (http://i5.tinypic.com/14aamc1.jpg)

dwarf conifer (not really sure of the name; these are common plants here): http://i6.tinypic.com/14aao74.jpg (http://i6.tinypic.com/14aao74.jpg)

maybe a stunted-growth spruce? in moss: http://i6.tinypic.com/14aaot1.jpg (http://i6.tinypic.com/14aaot1.jpg)

nearby river, just outside the village, with lots of green cover: http://i5.tinypic.com/14aaqz4.jpg (http://i5.tinypic.com/14aaqz4.jpg)

the main road as it is quite a ways from the village, with plenty of green on both sides: http://i6.tinypic.com/14abdqs.jpg (http://i6.tinypic.com/14abdqs.jpg)

water lillies in a local pond: http://i6.tinypic.com/14abgvo.jpg (http://i6.tinypic.com/14abgvo.jpg)

not exactly foliage; just a piece of driftwood on a nearby shore that I thought was photogenic: http://i5.tinypic.com/14abhvo.jpg (http://i5.tinypic.com/14abhvo.jpg)

cotton grass, very common here: http://i5.tinypic.com/14abjuq.jpg (http://i5.tinypic.com/14abjuq.jpg)

pitcher plant (crimson) amongst other common lower north shore plants: http://i5.tinypic.com/14abksm.jpg (http://i5.tinypic.com/14abksm.jpg)

washed-up kelp on shoreline: http://i5.tinypic.com/14abnl0.jpg (http://i5.tinypic.com/14abnl0.jpg)

sheep laurel (pink) and other bog plants: http://i6.tinypic.com/14abqs9.jpg (http://i6.tinypic.com/14abqs9.jpg)

toadstools are everywhere here, and are probably extremely toxic: http://i6.tinypic.com/14abtj6.jpg (http://i6.tinypic.com/14abtj6.jpg)

I'm not sure what these are, but they grow everywhere here: http://i5.tinypic.com/14abu6p.jpg (http://i5.tinypic.com/14abu6p.jpg)

a variety of wild berries: http://i6.tinypic.com/14afv36.jpg (http://i6.tinypic.com/14afv36.jpg)

wild blueberries: http://i6.tinypic.com/14ag268.jpg (http://i6.tinypic.com/14ag268.jpg)

raspberries in the wild: http://i5.tinypic.com/14ag83k.jpg (http://i5.tinypic.com/14ag83k.jpg)

bakeapple (cloudberry) and other plants: http://i5.tinypic.com/14abz2c.jpg (http://i5.tinypic.com/14abz2c.jpg)

I'm going to try and transplant a few of these to my garden - I've seen others here do likewise, with varying degrees of success. The only plants that don't transplant well at all are from the bog, so generally we leave those alone.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Morning Glory on June 15, 2006, 01:40:40 PM
Baby Boomer, that bakeapple/cloudberry plant is quite cool.  I've never seen such a flower.

Here are some pics of my garden taken yesterday?


Front yard with ground cover thyme, hosta and sandcherry shrubs.  (Small one at front of picture was eaten by an anthill last summer.)
(http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d198/idontandwontevergolf/HPIM0239.jpg)

Front yard showing goutweed (thought I got rid of it all last year), creeping rose, snowball (viburnem sp?), hostas, sedums, and other things that haven't flowered yet so I don't know what they are.
(http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d198/idontandwontevergolf/HPIM0236.jpg)


My vegetable garden!
(http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d198/idontandwontevergolf/HPIM0230.jpg)

Backyard with annuals.  Morning Glories are climbing up the willow twigs in the raised planter and the strings on the garage - can't really see them yet.
(http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d198/idontandwontevergolf/HPIM0227.jpg)

The wild part of the garden.  (Or, where little boys go to pee if they haven't already peed in the pool.)
(http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d198/idontandwontevergolf/HPIM0228.jpg)

IF THESE IMAGES ARE TOO BIG LET ME KNOW ASAP AND I'LL DELETE THEM.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on June 15, 2006, 02:12:37 PM
Wow, Morning Glory, I'm green with envy! You have a great gardener's touch. BTW, the bakeapple/cloudberry is our main source of natural Vitamin C here - we make bakeapple jam, butter, tarts, pie, cake, and we even freeze bakeapples for the winter. Bakeapples are especially popular in Labrador, although where I live is called "Quebec Labrador". I have bakeapple jam on toast every morning.

ps: I was going to take a break from posting, but I have to remain at the apartment for a few days while we continue the negotiations around the insurance and mortgage for the new place. So, I'm here for a few days yet.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on June 15, 2006, 02:14:49 PM
Quote from: Morning Glory

IF THESE IMAGES ARE TOO BIG LET ME KNOW ASAP AND I'LL DELETE THEM.


They're the perfect size. And 'm green with envy. Can I hire you to do some landscaping here when I get moved? (actually said in jest, I can't afford to hire anyone)
Title: Art in the Garden
Post by: deBeauxOs on June 16, 2006, 11:16:55 AM
Art in the Garden (http://www.kiwigardens.ca/index1.html) show, June 18-19, at Kiwi Gardens near Perth, Ontario.

I will be going tomorrow.  Will take pix and show them to my plants, so they'll know what my expectations are for them.   :lol:

(http://www.kiwigardens.ca/images/aigivan.jpg)

From last year's show.
Title: Re: Art in the Garden
Post by: Boom Boom on June 16, 2006, 10:40:13 PM
Quote from: deBeauxOs
I will be going tomorrow.  Will take pix and show them to my plants, so they'll know what my expectations are for them.   :lol:


 :mrgreen:  :mrgreen:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on June 17, 2006, 10:38:18 AM
:lol:

Morning Glory, you have the touch. Also, you are making me feel guilty. I am still ridiculously weedy, and we may be passing the point of no return soon, given the tropical conditions now descending on this city.

Och, I have been such a slouch.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on August 06, 2007, 10:23:17 AM
The blackflies were really bad this morning while I was out watering the grass and the gardens.

I had expected the birds would be eating them all!

Perhaps the birds are too well fed from the birdseed I put out every day? :feedbirds:  At least you can hear them all singing when I approach with their feed, and replenish the two bird baths. :feedbirds:

A few frogs and toads have shown up, as well. Wish they were bigger, so I could avoid them. I want them to do their part in keeping the bug population down.

No snakes - I had expected common garter snakes to show up and keep the mice population down - I've only seen one mouse here this year - he kept falling into the hole I dug for the garden gate, and I kept having
to fish him out. About a kilometer away, a friend's garden is overrun with mice, while another, a bit further away, has a problem with ground hogs eating everything in their garden. I don't have those problems!

But - the blackflies are really, really bad this year  :(

My potato crop is doing very well, meslun lettuce appears okay, carrots are making an appearance, as are the turnips and beans. No tomatoes yet - guess this year is just too cold. The zinnias are doing very well - the sunflowers and hostas not well at all.  :(

I love listening to the birds sing for their supper! :feedbirds: :feedbirds: :feedbirds:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on August 06, 2007, 10:36:21 AM
Blackflies are usually dead by August; yours are thriving since the lower North Shore has not had a killer heat wave.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on August 06, 2007, 10:39:18 AM
And we've had rain every week since April. My crops aren't doing well because of the cold, and maybe the saltwater air. Other gardens, further away from the shoreline, are doing better than mine. And, perhaps, they've had fertilizer and compost - I had neither.
Title: gardens
Post by: faith on August 06, 2007, 11:30:47 AM
My lettuce is all done - does anyone know if you can plant a second crop? We won't get a frost here until November at the earliest , so will lettuce withstand the hot weather of August and be ready to eat in September? Green onions which were lovely are also all finished - I have a packet of seeds so I am going to plant some where the garlic was growing and see if I can get some more before the growing season is finished.

Never buy bedding plants at Wal-Mart. I don't usually shop at Wal-Mart but I was stuck in a place doing nothing around planting time and they were open, so I bought some English Cucumber- which turned out to be plain ordinary everyday cucumber. I bought tomatoes  which were also labelled wrong.

My UFO zucchini (grown from seed0 is almost ready to start harvesting, the squash is also coming along and the peas we've been eating for a while now.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Debra on August 06, 2007, 12:12:40 PM
yes you can definitely plant a second crop. It might need more water though and watch for bolting.

I didn't shop at WalMart but my tomatoes were labelled wrongly also. I bought heritage and got roma.
Title: gardens
Post by: faith on August 06, 2007, 09:15:32 PM
Thanks for the lettuce info- I went to Victoria Seeds website which specializes in heritage seeds and found an interesting 'winter mix' for lettuce. I think I'll order some as well as some sugar snap peas and see what happens.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on August 06, 2007, 09:39:56 PM
With the LR window being an old-fashioned bay window, I didn't know what to plant under it on the ground. The ground is basically sand, hard, never gets rained on. So I threw one packet of wildflower seeds under it. I bought the seed packet at Zellers. Now I am dying to know what company made them.

It has exceeded any of my expectations. I LOVE The Wee Flowers, from a burnt orange to orange to that incredible Periwinkle Blue/Purple. Really nice, but I soooooooooooo miss the River.  :(
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on August 15, 2007, 12:48:00 PM
:feedbirds: :feedbirds:  :feedbirds:  :spy: :feedbirds:  :feedbirds: :feedbirds:

Just back from pulling the weeds out of the garden, watering the grass seed and crops, and feeding the birds. The birds don't even fly away now when I come near them. I think they know I'm the one who feeds them. Lots of Mourning Doves and Goldfinches today.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: kuri on August 15, 2007, 02:35:29 PM
I'm starting to brainstorm about landscaping for next year.

For the space in front of my hedges, I want to get rid of the lawn (less mowing = happier me), but replace it with something that will be both low-maintenance and pretty. Here's my (very rough) plan for what I think I'll do:

In a row immediately in front of the hedges (which are cotoneasters), I think I'll try to get some Weigela Minuet shrubs (http://www.horticlick.com/p/weigela_minuet1.html). They'll be shorter than the hedges, and will get a mix of shade and sun, so I hope they'll do well. I really like the way they look.

Then I need something shorter yet to put in front of that. I could choose between (or do a mix of) hostas (this page has some good pairings, I think (http://www.flower-gardening-made-easy.com/hostas.html)), Lilies of the Valley (http://www.veseys.com/ca/en/store/fallbulbs/lilyofthevalley/lilyofthevalley3), Heucheras (http://www.devonian.ualberta.ca/getgro116.html) or maybe primroses. Or, I guess, a whole number of other things (http://www.wildaboutgardening.org/en/whats_new/shade_garden/shade_gardening.htm). Mainly, though, I want something that won't be a lot of work, that will block out weeds and just generally look pretty and make my life easier. (Yes, I realize that last one seems like a rather inappropriate expectation for a plant. :D )


This photo gives one a good idea of the height of the hedges. (http://www.flickr.com/photos/kurichina/804559540/)
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Debra on August 15, 2007, 02:46:51 PM
you might get some ideas forplants here (http://www.localgardener.net/alberta/previouspub/gardening/designing_grasses.htm)


or here (http://www.wildaboutflowers.ca/Growing%20Info.html)
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: kuri on September 01, 2007, 07:43:23 PM
:rant: OK, well this makes me really mad. This woman spends years building up a beautiful, pesticide-free garden only for the City of Toronto to sweep in and Round-Up the whole thing, probably after some complaint from an ignorant neighbour.  :rant2:

Optimus Crime: Toronto Hates Your Garden (http://www.optimuscrime.com/?p=1658)

Edited to add Treehugger article (http://www.treehugger.com/files/2007/08/city_destroys_1.php), which explains that they didn't just remove plants that could have been interpreted as weeds because they weren't flowering, but also whole shrubs and a freakin' tree!  :shock:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Debra on September 01, 2007, 07:56:18 PM
Oh holy fuck I feel like crying.

What the hell were they thinking!  :rant2:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on September 01, 2007, 07:59:23 PM
I wonder where that is. I see cars in front driveways, which argues some neighbourhoods and not others, although not necessarily.

I share your despair, kuri. I'm surprised my neighbours haven't done that to me yet, although I have been nowhere near as virtuous as Ms Dales. I am utterly pesticide-free, but the weeds, alas ...

Down the street from our old place was a garden like that that I watched kept very carefully for at least twenty years. Some other neighbours laughed at it, but it was not weedy, just wild, and it produced a rolling succession of perennial flowers through the three seasons, unlike some of the more "proper" gardens around it. Sweet old lady was out there every day, knowing just which weeds to pluck and which to leave.

At least she was left free to do that until she died. The people who bought her house had the whole thing dug up immediately, of course.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on September 01, 2007, 08:04:51 PM
Quote from: skdadl

At least she was left free to do that until she died. The people who bought her house had the whole thing dug up immediately, of course.


The sheer stupidity of PEOPLE will never leave me gapless, not ever.

Or should I say people wity pay/pensions/peers/poopy-do the same neighbours. The sheer stupidity is totally outstanding, totally.

We should all go out and poop on our neighbours front 'bit' and see if they like that better. I'll do it, no problem.

ETA - Poop For Freedom
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: kuri on September 01, 2007, 08:23:32 PM
:rotfl: I like that image, Toedancer. Poop for freedom! :D

This story hits a nerve with me precisely because of the idea I'm planning for the small strip of grass in front of my hedge. I don't want to mow more stupid lawn. I like weeding and I like watering, but I could care less about lawngrass. I would normally reckon that as long as I'm not an easement, I should be able to do whatever I want.

Last year a neighbour make a semi-threatening reference to "calling the city to bring some goats in", but I checked the by-laws and it seems like as for the area from the sidewalk onwards, I should be able to do what I want (with the exception of thistles - Edmonton will fine you for thistles, which seem to be really bad this year).

But what strikes me about what Toronto did to this woman's garden is the scale. I can see cutting down the part on the easement, or even just around the sidewalk. Ripping out entire shrubs and trees is just plain vindictive.  :x
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Croghan27 on September 01, 2007, 08:34:18 PM
Fort McMurray was going to fine me for a tree overhanging a sidewalk.

I thought it was sort of nice, it did not interfere with the passersby, but at a distance looked like a tunnel through the green.  :mrgreen:

When they threatened to do it themselves then charge me for it, then fine me for it, I cut back the branches.   :(
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Debra on September 01, 2007, 08:37:09 PM
Quote
I thought it was sort of nice, it did not interfere with the passersby, but at a distance looked like a tunnel through the green.


I love that effect. That's one of the great things about a mature neighbourhood.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 07, 2007, 04:44:39 PM
I was throwing the firewood into the woodshed, when suddenly the chipmunks ran inside and started chittering away - I guess for more sunflower seeds.

Everyday I've got roughly 40 buntings, goldfinches, wrens, and ravens, and two chipmunks. Going through a lot of seed these days.  :feedbirds:  :feedbirds:  :feedbirds:  :feedbirds:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Debra on September 07, 2007, 04:59:55 PM
....and a partridge in a pear treeeeee.....
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 07, 2007, 05:01:38 PM
:rotfl:  :rotfl:  :rotfl:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on September 08, 2007, 10:41:06 AM
I have to go out and give my Arctic blue willow some love ... before I chop him back severely. My fault that he has grown out of control, but we can't have a repeat next year, and he needs a little time to recover from his wounds before winter comes. There are lots of other things I won't get done, but that I must do, absolutely must. I have been a bad mama to that lovely bush.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 08, 2007, 11:53:46 AM
I started giving my wild roses extra water this year, and they bloomed quite well. Don't know what else I can do to them. My sunflowers are blooming - took them long enough.  :?  The zinnias were gorgeous, but they and the tulips are finished for this year.  I'm planting perrenial wildflowers this fall, all over the place.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: anne cameron on September 08, 2007, 12:50:31 PM
Boom...I gave my wild roses a shot of rose fertilizer...wow!  Much reward, they were obviously grateful.  And last Solstice I cut them back, not so much "pruning" as "hacking" and that was good for them, too.

I always wait until at least Solstice before I prune anything, by then the sap and "life force" has been withdrawn down into the roots and the tree or bush or whatever is sleeping so it doesn't get hurt or "bleed" or...

Out here we have to walk the line between what "the books" say with regard to pruning and what makes sense because most of the books say, for example, wait until February before having a go at fruit trees but some springtimes, if you wait until then, the sap is already rising and if we've had a particularly mild winter some things are already starting to come awake again.

One Solstice I already had new growth buds on my roses..of course, other years everything is sound asleep, so luck plays a part in it.

I'm going to cut back my pussy willow tree this winter.  Cannot believe how she has grown.  And the "balm of gideon" bush is definately on her way to being a tree.  

Must be all that rain!
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 08, 2007, 01:03:02 PM
Sounds like you have a great garden, Anne. Of course, living in the rain forest of BC, that's to be expected.  :wink:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: anne cameron on September 08, 2007, 04:45:45 PM
Boom, my "garden" is a mess.  The ground gets further and further away every year and somehow (how??) that seems linked to the proliferation of weeds.  Most of which I basically tolerate, especially if they get flowers of any kind.  I hate creeping buttercup but I think I've given up the fight against it, talk about the teaspoon to empty the ocean.  I'm at the point where stuff gets put out, it gets watered, it gets fertlized and if it can't make it after that, well, rest in peace.  Or pieces.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 08, 2007, 05:27:31 PM
I have a creeping weed that's actually good looking - it's a long red stem that produces tiny green leaves. Doesn't stand up, though, just spreads across the lawn. That's okay, because it adds a contrast to the clover and other attractive weeds. Actually looks quite artistic. I'll leave it be.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on September 08, 2007, 06:35:57 PM
It sounds like Creeping Charlie (http://wihort.uwex.edu/turf/CreepingCharlie.htm) ... not to be confused with Peeping Tom.   :P
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 08, 2007, 07:14:54 PM
Quote from: deBeauxOs
It sounds like Creeping Charlie (http://wihort.uwex.edu/turf/CreepingCharlie.htm) ... not to be confused with Peeping Tom.   :P


Close, but no potato. The creeping vine here is all very bright red stem, with the tiny green leaves. Very artistic.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: anne cameron on September 08, 2007, 09:04:34 PM
Creeping Charlie looks a bit like creeping pink buttercup and it's a pain in the face, too.  I have a weed which has sort'a kind'a valentine shaped leaves, gets yellow flowers, I like it so well I've moved it into some of the containers, it does better than lobelia, which has been hybridized to the point it's almost too precious to grow any more!  Then there is nepeata...it can be a pain in the ass if it gets into a garden bed where you don't want it but it makes a good ground cover for those of us who do not want a "lawn", resent having to burn gas to cut the grass, but don't want to live in a hayfield.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 08, 2007, 10:17:10 PM
The creeping ground vine here seems to take its own space where there was exposed dirt and no grass. That's okay with me. I'll watch to see if it pushes the grass out. But the creeping vine looks great - doesn't bother me at all. I might trim it if it looks like it's taking over the lawn.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 16, 2007, 07:36:32 PM
Art In The Garden (http://feralglass.blogspot.com/) gives me ideas. I think in 2008, I'll do some creative artwork on my woodshed and on the plexiglass fence around my veggie garden. I don't think these glass creations would stand up to the very strong wind we get here occasionally.

Hmmm.... I think I'll buy some paint and brushes and let my visitors be creative, as well. :popcorn
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on September 16, 2007, 08:14:37 PM
So who is this gyu Art and why would you let him run wild in your garden?  :wink:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: on September 16, 2007, 08:16:47 PM
Because they let his brother Harry in, and he'd be miffed otherwise.

(Belated realization)  Hey!  Just a second there ...
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 16, 2007, 10:10:33 PM
:drift_police:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: anne cameron on September 16, 2007, 10:13:47 PM
And don't forget creeping Charlie...
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on September 16, 2007, 10:48:11 PM
What about crouching Cyril?  Doesn't he get any respect?   :annoyed:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 16, 2007, 10:58:20 PM
:whis:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on September 17, 2007, 10:47:08 AM
Inspired by Boom Boom's bird lunch counter exploits, I moved my feeder upstairs where I can reach out my bathroom window to hook it onto  sturdy upper branches of the locust tree located in my side yard.  The chickadees descend upon it and Poqui spends hours in the sunlit window, watching them.  That window is diagonally opposite to my office one (it's an old row house and the side jogs in) and I can hear their song.  The leaves in the honey locust are turning yellow ...  :?
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 17, 2007, 11:04:25 AM
The birds can see you in the bathroom? :shock:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on September 17, 2007, 11:07:46 AM
The birds could see me in my birthday suit and I could see the birds in their birdday suits when the window is open.  I have a translucent window.  When it is closed light streams in, but nothing is visible.   :lol:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 17, 2007, 11:09:30 AM
I was solely concerned with your safety, dollink.  :whis:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on September 17, 2007, 11:25:51 AM
Peeping birds?
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 17, 2007, 11:32:55 AM
Remember the Hitchcock film? :?
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on September 17, 2007, 11:36:03 AM
Errr ... yes.  But there is a metal screen mesh separating me from the birds.  When you stand in your garden, swarmed by birds, where's your protection?

Or are you refering to Psycho?
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 17, 2007, 11:39:00 AM
Oh, the birds recognise my  :spy:  credentials and stay their distance.  :whis:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: anne cameron on September 17, 2007, 01:49:33 PM
Not really as bird brained as they are said to be, obviously..........
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 19, 2007, 04:46:53 PM
I wonder if discarded sunflower hulls provide fertilizer? I've got lots of the stuff in the grass and in the gardens from where the birds, the chipmunk, and the mole leave them. I don't fancy trying to clean them all up.

The birds are really getting used to me. When I'm out stacking firewood in the woodshed, they fly around me, wish I could understand what they're saying. Even the chipmunk doesn't run away when I approach, although he hightails it out of here fast when the neighborhood dogs make their unwanted visit. It's because of the dogs that I have most of the gardens fenced off. I wanted a safe haven where the birds (and chipmunk) can eat merrilly away.  :feedbirds:  :feedbirds:  :feedbirds:  :feedbirds:  :feedbirds:  :feedbirds:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on September 19, 2007, 06:11:03 PM
Sunflower husks will decompose, eventually.  I'm beginning to think of you as Francis Assisi of the Lower North Shore ....  :lol:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 19, 2007, 06:18:52 PM
That's a compliment. I've always liked Francis of Assisi; I've got two bios of him. :age:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: lagatta on September 19, 2007, 07:28:07 PM
When in Assisi (remember, I studied in Perugia; Assisi is only about 30 km away) one sees not only Christian pilgrims - and not only Catholics among them - but also a large number of Buddhists, including Buddhist monks and nuns. The Buddha also cast away the privileges of his spoilt youth to develop compassion for all beings.

I'm not either Christian or Buddhist, but I really like Francesco, Chiara etc...
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 25, 2007, 06:50:07 PM
I've been busy getting firewood and stacking it, and also reinforcing a wall of the garage where the wood is stacked. Also have been out in the veggie garden harvesting potatoes, carrots, rutabaga, and Meslun lettuce. There's a heck of a lot of lettuce! It grows really well here. Not so for everything else - I really have to fertilize well, and dig up the weeds. The potatoes, rutabaga, and carrots are half small, half medium size. No large veggies other than the lettuce. The cabbage failed completely. The green and black beans were good.

After I get the firewood finished - hopefully this week, provided I don't have to go out to the hospital - then I'll bring in the rest of the veggies before the frost hits.

As for the greenhouse, well, the tomatoes are small and green.  :(

ps: these potatoes only take five minutes to boil through.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on September 25, 2007, 07:00:16 PM
The good news is that tiny veggies are more tender than big old ones - you should remember that from being zucchini'ed, Boom Boom!  :P
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 25, 2007, 08:28:20 PM
Yup!  The garden veggies are quite good when they're small. However, some of them are too small to bother with.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Herr Magoo on September 25, 2007, 08:37:43 PM
Au contraire!  What could be more delicious than a half a teaspoon full of baby peas?   :)
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 25, 2007, 08:41:00 PM
Yes, of course. Except I don't grow them. :wink:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 29, 2007, 11:15:09 AM
No skitters here for almost a month now - yayyy!

I have about half of my backyard fenced in to protect the wee birdies, moles, and chipmunks from roving dogs and cats, and it's become a small
wild bird sanctuary.

I'm fascinated with this. A family of Mourning Doves comes every afternoon, and in the mornings my backyard is alive with buntings, sparrows, grosbeaks, finches, and seven coal black Ravens who have a tendency to scare away everything but the chipmunks.

Any suggestions on how to make the bird sanctuary even more attractive to my winged friends?

I already have planted some shrubs and  I probably should plant a few more. Sunflowers don't do well here - there's just too much wind. I have some apple seedlings that will take probably ten years to reach a decent
height for birds to build nests in. :garden  :feedbirds:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on September 29, 2007, 11:20:21 AM
Quote from: Boom Boom
... Any suggestions on how to make the bird sanctuary even more attractive to my winged friends?...
You could set up a bird bath but then you'll have to hose out the old water every day and provide fresh, to prevent it from becoming a skeeter breeding post.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 29, 2007, 12:26:15 PM
Quote from: deBeauxOs
You could set up a bird bath but then you'll have to hose out the old water every day and provide fresh, to prevent it from becoming a skeeter breeding post.


Yes, I've two bird baths, and I hose them out every day. Only takes a few hours for each of them to get quite soiled.

The sun is out today, and the wild things are pretty frisky. There was an eagle flying over the village today - we see about one or two of these large birds every year. I had an owl at the bird bath a few days ago.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on September 29, 2007, 02:09:15 PM
Well, other than cobbling together some means of sheltering the wee critters who visit your garden from the rafales et bourrasques blowing in from the St-Laurent, you're providing all that they need - they don't watch TV and so far, don't require internet access.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 29, 2007, 02:27:52 PM
Quote from: deBeauxOs
Well, other than cobbling together some means of sheltering the wee critters who visit your garden from the rafales et bourrasques blowing in from the St-Laurent, you're providing all that they need - they don't watch TV and so far, don't require internet access.
[/b]

 :rotfl:  :rotfl:  :rotfl:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 29, 2007, 04:31:24 PM
We're expecting temps of -1C Monday night, which is close to frost, so I'm scrambling to get the last of the lettuce, tomatoes, rutabaga, carrots, and potatoes inside the house. Not frost, but very close to it. Early this year.  :garden
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: anne cameron on September 29, 2007, 04:44:44 PM
My mouse seems pretty connected to the internet.  Doesn't eat much, though.  Just the odd kilowatt every year or so...

We are hunkering down for a big storm.  Pouring rain and the ocean is heaving furiously.  I went outside and everything is so quiet, no sign of birds, not even sound of crickets (!)... as if everything is settling in for a real roof-ripper.

Had a great feed of chard last night, with halibut.  Today I'm looking forward to beet tops with boiled baby spuds and maybe celery stuffed with cream cheese.

The great thing bout living alone is you can just eat what you get a yen for and not have to worry about "nutrition" or "diet" or ...having a meat pie, too, my friend Lance makes them and they are incredibly good!

Guess I should get busy and get it cooked before the storm hits, be a bugger to be stuck without power, yearing for beet tops...
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on September 29, 2007, 06:20:39 PM
Quote from: anne cameron
... The great thing bout living alone is you can just eat what you get a yen for and not have to worry about "nutrition" or "diet" or ...
setting an example for anyone!  :lol:

Not often, but sometimes if I feel like having a dessert, I will eat a small sweet, like one small portion of crème caramel mid-day - before my veggies and protein!
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 29, 2007, 07:06:45 PM
Beets grow really well here, but I didn't plant any this year, I'm not especially fond of them. Chard sounds interesting - I'll have to see if they'll grow here. I forgot all about the spinach - it didn't grow at all. The peppers, squash, and cucumber plants didn't produce anything. I'll use all the greens for compost.

I'll have to plan carefully for next year - only the hardy stuff that is sure to grow. Maybe more varieties of carrots, potatoes, and turnip. And maybe some beets for the neighbours.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Croghan27 on September 29, 2007, 08:15:19 PM
Quote from: deBeauxOs
Quote from: anne cameron
... The great thing bout living alone is you can just eat what you get a yen for and not have to worry about "nutrition" or "diet" or ...
setting an example for anyone!  :lol:


stories of the oil sands ....

Now John was a decend fellow and used to invite Don, the biker, over for Christmas dinner. Don lived alone, just he and his soft tail (http://medicinehat.kijiji.ca/c-cars-vehicles-motorcycles-2001-Harley-Davidson-Heritage-Classic-Soft-Tail-W0QQAdIdZ24527121), and did pretty much as he pleased.

Dinner was set one year but John and Don were looking at something while Melony and the kids assembled at the table. Melony gave the kids a lecture about the order of eating - the desert comes last!

when Don arrived with daddy John they sat at the table and biker, loner Don said: 'My that looks good." :D  and promptly gobbled the pumpkin pie.

The kids looked all the world like this --->  :shock: , and Melony looked like this  -->  :annoyed: , and John, far and away the most mellow, looked like this -->  :rotfl:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on September 29, 2007, 11:31:43 PM
My tomatoes did not do very well this year, but the perennials were amazing - my clematis is still flowering , the asters are quite beautiiful at the moment and one of the rose bushes has a new bloom.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: steffie on September 30, 2007, 09:32:16 AM
Two nagging questions: 1) Is a bleeding heart plant related to celery?  The leaves and stalks look similar, and when I cut them back it even smells similar!  2) How do I attract only the small birds to my feeder/repel pigeons and crows? Small feed?

P.S. I looooooove autumn.  and reading garden threads.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 30, 2007, 10:38:14 AM
I got big ravens here that gobble up the small feed, so that don't work. Maybe cover with chicken wire or plastic fencing that only small birds can get through.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on September 30, 2007, 11:39:17 AM
I found a type of feeder that is basically a long cylinder with a very small platter at the bottom, which is mostly there to catch stray seeds.  There are tiny perches attached to the sides of the clear cylinder, below funnel-type openings.  Chickadees and sparrows perch on the side, and grab the seed by thrusting their beaks into the openings.  I once saw a blue jay attempt to get at the seed - his weight see-sawed the feeder while he was holding on, very little seed fell out and he flew away, frustrated, never to return.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: steffie on September 30, 2007, 02:16:04 PM
yep, I've seen Jays try to get into my "small pentagon hut" style feeder, but pigeons and crows are ornerier.  I'm going to experiment with different seed formulations.  I believe that leaving out sunflower seeds may deter many unwanted diners.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 30, 2007, 04:43:59 PM
I just had a flock of medium-size speckled birds in the bird bath behind the house. They kept pushing each other out so they could each take a bath. Hilarious! Wish my digicam worked.  :lol:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: k'in on September 30, 2007, 06:46:28 PM
The birdies have so much fun, splashing about in the water.  Hard to believe how dirty they leave the bird bath.  Guess they get so dirty, flying about and hanging around in trees due to pollution.  The little sparrows like to take "dirt" baths in the sandy earth so that explains part of it, still, it's mighty scrubbing restoring the BB to clean and clear.

As for feeders, seems as it is a matter of if you build it (feed them) they will come.  Sometimes putting out peanuts in the shell will slow down squirrels and bluejays, but only a little.  Debating whether to plant more tulips.  

Roses here too (hybrid teas) blooming again.  The geraniums are good, also the waxy begonias which underwhelm during the summer are flourishing.  The tomatoes have been good, considering they got moved three times, 'cept for the unexpected pleasant  surprise rogue plant that is a grape/roma type.  The biggest one is a best girl(?), lost the info stake, and has about 20 fruits that look good but haven't ripened at all over the past week.  Added stakes, tied them up in hopes that sunlight or something will encourage them as they are very pulpy/tasty.

This has been a wonderful, sunny September compared to 2006.  Still haven't been forced to wear socks, and this week's forecast looks to be pretty decent.  (R)October-here we come!
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: anne cameron on September 30, 2007, 08:17:41 PM
My tommytoes wouldn't ripen, they just flat out would not and then I remembered being told if you wanted to ripen fruit, put it in a brown bag with a banana and it will ripen very quickly.  Didn't have a brown bag big enough for the whole greenhouse but I hung three bananas on the wire pyramid dealy holding up one of the tommytoe plants...hey, I'm up to my nose holes in nice red tommytoes!

As for bulbs and pesky rodents...MOTH BALLS...keeps cats from pooping in the flowerbeds, too.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 30, 2007, 09:22:55 PM
Quote from: k'in
still, it's mighty scrubbing restoring the BB to clean and clear.


I resemble that remark!   :age:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on October 01, 2007, 08:03:30 AM
Arrrgggh... the frost hit 24 hours early.  :(

I didn't get all the lettuce in - simply no room for all of it in the fridge.

I guess I'll throw the rest of the lettuce - something like 20 heads - into the composter.

I wish I could think of other uses for lettuce that was left out in the frost.

The good news - it's warming up here a bit this week! Yayyy!  :age:

I'm just back from feeding and watering the birds. Both bird baths were frozen over, had to get the ice out and put fresh water in. The birds are cavorting around in their baths right now. Hilarious to watch.  :lol:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on October 01, 2007, 06:59:30 PM
Goodness.  That was a short summer!  Next year, before you put in your garden, you may want to ask around who grew what, and with what degree of success.  Someone closer inland, with a sheltered garden may have grown stuff you can't, and you may want to do a trade of produce.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on October 01, 2007, 07:54:58 PM
All good ideas, dollink. The truly succesful gardens here are those that are old and have been fertilized regularly, thus have excellent soil. I think my garden will be much better next year after I've done the necessary.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: justme on October 03, 2007, 12:07:53 PM
Brought the last of my crop in last weekend, all told I lost about 2/3 of it to mold.  serious bummer, July was just way too wet.  But, hey I didn't lose it all, as I was out every day cutting away moldy bits.  Somethin's better than nothin'!

Hopefully I will have better weather next year.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on October 13, 2007, 02:32:22 PM
I just braved the cold, wind, and rain to get 100 wildflower perennial bulbs planted, including Iris Reticulata, Ornith Balansaes, Narc. Tete, Hyacinth Blue Grape, Winter Aconite, Glory O/T Snow, Crocus mix, and Puschkinian Lib.

(huh? these names are Greek to me)

I hope next spring they all grow!

150 more bulbs on order.

Then I still have to fertilize everything.  :Garden1
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on October 13, 2007, 02:44:12 PM
That's a very good selection.  Some - if not all - of those will naturalize, and spread out through extended root networks and formation of new bulbs.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on October 13, 2007, 02:50:43 PM
And they're perennials, which hopefully means they shall grow every year. Hopefully. :age:
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on April 09, 2008, 02:45:45 PM
OOooo Boom Boom, let us know when all of your bulbs are up! Blazing display this spring I hope.

I've just raked every nook and cranny, rose of sharon is back, coneflowers have a few leaves and of course the daylillies are all up. It's simply mahvellous! Lots of ladybugs, but see no fuzzy caterpillars, drats.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on April 09, 2008, 02:50:56 PM
Gotta prune, gotta prune ...
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on April 12, 2008, 08:45:48 PM
Does anyone have Pink Pampas Grass in their garden? Oh gawd look at it, awesome. Its friggin grass/hay for that matter and it takes 2-3 years from seed to bloom. Hells Bells.
http://www.amazon.com/White-Pink-Pampas ... B000OZWBUI (http://www.amazon.com/White-Pink-Pampas-Grass-Plants/dp/B000OZWBUI)

I wish this community was more into thinning and then sharing as my old nabe.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: kuri on April 13, 2008, 03:24:15 PM
Oh, wow, Toe - that looks beautiful. And the scale is just fabulous.

Zones 7 to 9, though. :( That always happens to me when looking at plants. I'm zone 3A and I wish the seed catalogues would just sort by zone. I'd rather not be tempted by stuff I don't have a hope in hell of growing here. Now I understand why my mom (who gardens in Zone 2) found seed catalogues so irritating. She has is worse than I do, and I'm irritated by it!
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on April 13, 2008, 04:01:05 PM
Kuri, I went to a forum and saw S. Ontario gardeners discussing their pampas grasses. Simply becomes an annual here, and loves full sun, but it's possible. *sigh* I'll save to do another year.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on April 13, 2008, 04:57:20 PM
OMG, look what I have found. This lady calls her pampas grass ToeToe, hee-hee!
http://www.mooseyscountrygarden.com/isl ... plant.html (http://www.mooseyscountrygarden.com/island-garden/toe-toe-plant.html)
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on April 18, 2008, 06:42:40 PM
I overturned the small gardens I have, planted the nasturtium one and an extra one out back by basement door, don't know why exactly, just saw this perfect square, overturned the earth and plopped them in. My back is killing me. I'm too pooped to go to the health thread, but found out there is new keyhold surgery for bulging discs, yay, problem is they do one at a time and I have 3. Still though I'm glad I'll have my mobility back. I can shovel more snow, wash more floors, and overturn more earth. Yay me.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on April 18, 2008, 06:50:14 PM
Oh, Toe -- you've done the nasties! I love the nasties so much. You will have edible flowers and leaves by Dominion Day, and they are most tasty. Yum. Did you plant seeds or baby plants?

That is such a good thought. I shall work on nasties tomorrow.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on April 18, 2008, 06:57:00 PM
Seeds. I've been planting nasty seeds for about 25 years. Hardier, more colourful and will come up anywhere, drought resistant and glorious colour. I wuv them so much. I do not eat them, I could I suppose, but not really interested.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on April 18, 2008, 07:06:02 PM
Toe, there is no greenery more tastier tastiest than the leaf of a nastie. Trust me. Your salads will be brilliant. Crunch crunch.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on April 18, 2008, 08:10:47 PM
Well okay then. NOw I know why I planted the wee patch at the back door near some  herbs. I usually find the reasons I do things, willy nilly in the written word somewhere. Here will do as well.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: steffie on April 19, 2008, 04:23:34 PM
I just finished planting tulip and crocus bulbs.  I'm pretty sure they are all dead.  I heard on CBC radio from "the plant guy" that they had to be stored in the cool, dark AND moist, and if they are not firm to the touch then they are kaput.   Most of the ones I had (stored improperly) disintegrated to powder when squeezed.   There were a few (maybe 10) that were "firm", so I planted those.   Who knows?   Maybe some are viable still.   I watered them well, afterwards.  

Seeds - the next seeds I buy will be morning glory seeds.   Last year's old growth and the mesh up my porch wall will provide a nice base for the new vines to climb!

P.S.  I noticed as I raked the dead leaves away that the sweet pea vines are already starting!   But alas, no lattice as they are beneath a nice cedar shrub... maybe they will climb the tree.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on April 19, 2008, 08:11:49 PM
steffie, why did you store tulip and crocus bulbs? Some of the bulbs and tubers need to be dug up and stored, but not tulips and crocuses (crocii?), surely. In my experience, they are happiest spending the winter outside in the ground, as are the narcissi (daffodils). Some have a limited life (a few years), but many go on and on forever just left alone.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: steffie on April 19, 2008, 08:15:48 PM
My landlord gave them to me.  He made sure to tell me that he had stored them in a cool dark place (his basement).  I wonder in which decade he bought them.  Do you think they will survive?
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on April 19, 2008, 08:28:54 PM
Well, if they felt hollow and brittle to you and turned to powder if you squeezed them ... no. I have to say no.

To me, the best time to plant spring-flowering bulbs is the fall, maybe October. They like the winter; they really do.

Some of the tubers -- like begonias (tuberous begonias, not the little ones, which are just annuals) -- can't survive winter outside here, so you have to dig them up and store them. I've done that with limited success. I kind of think that anything we have to spoil that much is probably just not happy living more than one summer in Canada. We have to accept that some plants that are native elsewhere are just annuals here.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on April 21, 2008, 10:41:52 AM
I am going to plant zinnia seeds now. I've never planted zinnia before as I have in the past found them to be somewhat garish for my liking. I got them free in my thank you bag of goodies yesterday from the city. So what the hay.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: kuri on May 04, 2008, 03:37:14 PM
Is anyone else starting to get into  :panic  :panic  :panic mode? I started to take stock of the yard for the first time, as we finally have a gorgeous weekend. Grass already need a mow, dandelions are already blooming (grrr...) and I weeded enough of the little buggers out of my garden space to make into a salad.

The tomatoes I started from seed this year are puny and struggling despite (because?) of my investment in grow lights and covered bedding cells. I don't think I'll use the covers next year - kept too much moisture in and allowed mould to grow on the top of the soil. Better the plants deal with a bit of cold (I don't think it gets below freezing in my basement!) then mould. I'll probably have to buy a couple of tomato plants at the greenhouse this year. :(

Hoping to get everything in order next weekend so that I can start in on early planting on the weekend after that.

There's also the matter of the renovation garbage pile. I want that out of the yard before I go anything major with the garden (the path the work people would have to take is fairly close to the garden. I was supposed to arrange that for this weekend while L.'s in Dubai, but the previous week's cold snap made us decide to keep the old, yucky insulation (destined for the garbage pile and therefore the dump) in for a little longer.

I'm already scaling back was were surely wildly ambitious plans. I think all the cold weather before mentally unprepared me for spring. It made it seem so far away.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: steffie on May 04, 2008, 05:19:04 PM
I planted more morning glory seeds, and spread fresh 3-way* (love the name of that!) over all the beds in the front.  Next, I'll plant something bright in the window boxes.... but I've been warned to wait until after May 24.  One never knows when a sudden snow will come, it seems.

I was thinking of planting a nice herb-pot.  

*It turns out that this is the stuff I should have been asking for all along.  1 part each manure, peat, and soil.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: kuri on May 04, 2008, 08:27:30 PM
Or coir instead of peat. I find peat easier to get, too, but I'm trying to find a place where I can get coir as I understand peat bogs are endangered.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on May 16, 2008, 06:57:35 PM
I just love Sunflowers to death. Not the big tall ones, altho I love those in crops. I love the multi-coloured smaller variety. Now I have grown some from seed and they are ready for planting. So squirrels. Little fuckers destroyed the ones I had last year. So I can't use pepper powder or anything cuz that hurts their wee eyes and paws. But they do hate any kind of allium, So was thinking of planting a whack of chives in front of them. Their back will be to a wall. Whaddya think? Might work. I already know about dog hair and such, but the squirrels totally ignore that smell.

Are there squirrels in Afghanistan? Might be a good idea to ship a couple of million over to destroy the poppy fields.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: fern hill on May 16, 2008, 08:29:00 PM
I'm giggling. . .  shipping squirrels to Afghanistan. . .

I don't have a garden. But if I did, I'd have lilacs! Why doesn't everyone have lilacs?
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on May 16, 2008, 08:38:06 PM
Well cuz they are so easy to steal, hanging over everybodys fences the way they do. I got lilacs all thru the apt.
eta - and ya know, squirrels could prolly end the war, given half a chance.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Berlynn on May 16, 2008, 09:12:56 PM
I have lilacs, but they're not yet blooming.  Same with honeysuckle.  Leafing-out things seem to be a bit late this year.  Tomorrow I am uprooting the plum that won't grow and replacing it with a crabapple tree.  And I expect my first tulip to open tomorrow, too.  The tulipa tarda have been at it for a couple of days now.  They're the ones that look like daffodils.   Gorgeous!

I planted lettuces and spinach in the cold frame a couple of weeks ago and we should be eating that within the next week or so, maybe sooner as it could use a thinning.  We're digging up the rest of the garden tomorrow and I'll plant a few beets, corn, some spuds wherever I can sneak them in and another batch of lettuces (though I'm thinking I might do those in a pot so we can transport it to the cottage).  I'm going to hold off on tomatoes and cukes for a while because I think we still may get another frost.

I do love gardening!
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on May 17, 2008, 04:25:08 PM
TD, I don't nurture any tender feelings towards squirrels - I will sprinkle the hottest cayenne powder that I can find to keep them away.  Those bushy-tailed varmints are evil.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 17, 2008, 04:51:59 PM
I have lilacs. I'd go out and clip some, except that would mean pruning the Arctic blue willow, and I don't have the courage yet. Oh, I am going to burn in hell for what I have done to the Arctic blue willow, which deserved a better mother than I.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Berlynn on May 17, 2008, 09:11:20 PM
dBO, please do tell me more about cayenne.  I have a neighbour who is taming the squirrels by giving them peanuts!  Yesterday one was eating new leaves off the nanking cherry!!!  I think it was the same one which ate my zukes a few years ago...

skdadl, I shall join you in tree-pruners' hell!  Oy!  What I've done to the double-blossoming plum in the backyard!  Only salvation is that it's in the back!  Then again, we live in a neighbourhood of 2- and 3-storey houses, so nothing's really private back there.  *sigh*  Mind you, maybe I do harbour a secret desire to see it die because it is an ornamental and I would much prefer a fruit-bearing plum...

Speaking of second storeys...I noticed that the neighbour across the back has a white lilac  in full bloom.  Harumph!
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on May 17, 2008, 09:12:50 PM
I would rather you did not mention your poor blue willow, it just breaks my heart. And a good thing I'm not your neighbour or it would be done by now. Say, did you organize your nabes yet for using just the one giant blue box?  :rotfl:
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 17, 2008, 09:27:54 PM
Toe, I would rather I didn't mention the puir wee Arctic blue willow, which is unfortunately not all that wee at the moment, and that is Teh Problem. It should be wee, and it isn't, and that is my fault.

If I prune it back to proper size now, I could kill it, because all the new growth is yards and yards out at the too-long ends.

But I gotta do it. Ok. First thing tomorrow morning: skdadl tries to do some blue-willow whisperin'. Light another candle, Toe.   :wink:
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on May 17, 2008, 09:35:05 PM
Quote from: Berlynn
dBO, please do tell me more about cayenne.
I buy it in bulk from the local health food store.  Once, they even specially ordered a half-kilo bag of the hottest, most potent cayenne for me and it was much cheaper than buying it at the garden centre.  You have to be very, very cautious when you handle it - I use a funnel to pour it into a big old shaker, then on a windless, sunny day I generously sprinkle it around plants and bulbs that I want to protect from the squirrels.  

Youll need to do it again after it has rained, obviously.  There may be a technique to use for mixing it up with a binding agent like soap so you could spray it on leaves and new shoots - it's not toxic or harmful for flora or vegetation.  But again, careful handling - you really don't want to get it in your eyes or breathe it in.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on May 17, 2008, 10:17:48 PM
Okay that's it, I'm gonna do it! Squirrels will be begging to be shipped to Afghanistan!  :D

eta - Good Luck!  'dadl on the ladder?
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Berlynn on May 17, 2008, 11:06:01 PM
Heh-heh-heh! Them squirrels are gonna be a-hatin' us cayenne-wieldin' girruls! :flame
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Croghan27 on May 18, 2008, 03:14:29 AM
Quote from: Berlynn
dBO, please do tell me more about cayenne.  I have a neighbour who is taming the squirrels by giving them peanuts!  Yesterday one was eating new leaves off the nanking cherry!!!  I think it was the same one which ate my zukes a few years ago...
snip

I may have mentioned this before .... back in '99 or so I lived toward the end of King Street in Toronto (near what came to be known as the Popesquat). The house was rather sparce so I got some flower seeds and planted them in a box just outside the front door.

Up came my flowers and I was proud as a new father ..... until ... until some of the local wildlife, as in squirrels began to snack on my babies ......

I was working at SkyDome at te time an picked up some bags of peanuts after the ball game and would spend some time feeding the little darl'ins before going to bed just as the sun arose.

They still gobbled my budding buds!  :annoyed:

Ah ha .. says I - the shelled nuts are too difficult for the sweeties to access, and so would sit on my front steps and remove the shells - leaving only the bare nuts.

One morning, about 4:30 a prowler of the Toronto Police Service came by and slowed down to watch. The cop asked what I was doing there and I told him. Seeing the pile of shells in front of me ( I faithfully picked them up each night) he paused and said: "Oooookay." and drove on.

There I was, shelling peanuts for squirrels at hours late into the morning and everybody knew that the squirrels cared not. (except me).

Conceding defeat, I ceased the peanut action entirely and, sensibly went to bed after work.

Squirrels are evul. :evil:
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on May 18, 2008, 08:15:23 AM
Quote from: Toedancer
... So squirrels. Little fuckers destroyed the ones I had last year. So I can't use pepper powder or anything cuz that hurts their wee eyes and paws. But they do hate any kind of allium,
... It burns/stings them enough to cause temporary pain or irritation but it doesn't cause physical harm.  I can only plant daffodil and narcissus bulbs (they hate the smell, apparently) because from past experience, the carnage they wreak on crocus and tulips is awful.  And I can't afford to plant 50 of those bulbs to have a few survive.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 18, 2008, 08:24:45 AM
Quote from: Toedancer
 'dadl on the ladder?

Oh, no -- it won't take a ladder. The blue willow is a bush, meant to be a small bush but now, even when overgrown, still a bush. It looks a bit like a six-foot geodesic dome at the moment, although it has begun to flop from the centre because its branches are not supposed to be that long or get that heavy.

I secretly wish that I had a chainsaw so that I could just mow it off at about two feet, but I guess that's bad and lazy of me.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: k'in on May 18, 2008, 12:04:19 PM
Well, I planted a lilac a few years ago,and the only year it had blloms was the first.  I've tried loving it, hating it, and ignoring it, but alas no flowers.  It is thriving though...gets bigger every year.

No sign of the asparagus plant...guess it didn't make it through the winter.   :(   Did find some  of the Ontario harvest on sale yesterday-$1.47/pound.  Wrapped a few of them with a thin slice of proscuitto then grilled 'em.  Lots left over to get steamed for dinner.  Definitely a comfort food type of day....cold & rainy...
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Berlynn on May 18, 2008, 12:06:17 PM
Quote from: Croghan27
Squirrels are evul. :evil:

No argument here!  And, wtf are they doing on the prairies, anyway?  Tree squirrels.  On. The. Prairies.   :roll:
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on May 18, 2008, 04:59:45 PM
Squirrels are not the Einsteins of the rodent family.  You don't see beavers in the Prairies, do you?  Ground squirrels, now that makes sense.  Maybe some aggravated city-dweller in Winnipeg gathered up all the pesky squirrels that were laying waste to his garden, and kept driving until he hit the Saskatchewan border?
 :twisted:
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 18, 2008, 05:06:04 PM
But the prairies are lousy with beavers. There are beavers everywhere on the prairies! Well, on the rivers, of which there are quite a lot. What do we think the HBC and the Nor'Westers were doing out there, anyway, if not huntin' beaver? We were the fur trade.

It was striking to me when I came to Toronto that the anchor department store here was Eaton's. Out west, for ever and ever, the anchor store was always the HBC.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on May 18, 2008, 05:17:12 PM
Weren't they caught further north, where the grasslands stop and the forests start?
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 18, 2008, 05:24:57 PM
There are lots of trees along the rivers, even in the grasslands, even in the desert of the Palliser Triangle, where I grew up. We may be scrawny, but we are beaver territory all over the place.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Croghan27 on May 18, 2008, 06:04:25 PM
Quote from: deBeauxOs
Weren't they caught further north, where the grasslands stop and the forests start?

The area around Fort McMurray is serious beaver territory. The fish & wildlife people often have to come and remove a family of beavers who's dam and hut have caused one of the local streams to back up over the road.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: steffie on May 19, 2008, 08:02:44 AM
Quote
Why doesn't everyone have lilacs?
I, too, have a lilac bush (untrimmed) that grows a bit more each year.  I use it as camoflage for my front porch.  I can lounge/sunbathe behind it, unnoticed by the many foot travellers along my block.  As to what will make it  bloom?  I was told that the more I clip the blooms, the more the bush will produce more.  They look as if they need another week, maybe 2 to fully open.

The few (20 or so) possibly viable crocus and tulip bulbs I planted exactly 1 month ago are producing some sprouts (I see 5 or 6 for sure).  The biggest ones are 5" tall already!  :D

I am waiting to hear whether skdadl's will-o-wisp-ering has had a positive outcome.  (If it were me, I'd opt for the chainsaw solution.  What's the worse that can happen?)

I  have some pansies and impatiens in hanging baskets and pots brightening my front and back decks.  The best soil for these thirsty guys?  Pro Mix.  What great stuff that is!  You know, with the little gel water-holder particles?  The soil stays hydrated for a long while.

It's cool today, but the sun is trying to spend some time with me.    :Garden1
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 19, 2008, 09:04:49 AM
Och, Steffie, I haven't done it yet. I gotta get a grip, don't I.  

It is cool here too, bit of sun, although I fear it wants to rain. I remember rainy Victoria Days in the past -- I guess we just have to be patient ...  *tap tap tap*
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: kuri on June 02, 2008, 08:17:08 AM
L. and I bought a number of cherry shrub (Sandcherries mostly) at Hole's to fill in where the garbage removal people destroyed our back fence. Unfortunately, the area where we wanted to plant them most doesn't drain properly, but still they should grow into a fruit-bearing hedge in a few years.

A friend of mine has been researching a lot into hardy fruit trees that are meant to survive prairie winters and I'm quite excited about this work too. This place (http://www.hardyfruit.com/id6.html) even sells kiwi trees hardy to Zone 2! 2! Kiwis growing in Edmonton! I'm actually almost giddy at the idea.

Weirdly, of all the fruit bushes we have, the ones taking the longest to establish themselves (still haven't bore fruit) are the ones I thought were most suited to the climate and would produce the fastest: the Saskatoons. They grow a few inches of branches early in the summer and then just stop. Still weeding around them and watering, but the raspberries (planted at the time) have out grown them and out produced them 3 or 4 times over now.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Debra on June 02, 2008, 09:19:28 AM
Little darling, it's been a long cold lonely winter ...

I am listening to birds chirping merrily as they fed at the bird feeder. I didn't have birds all winter which was very depressing. Now that they know the feeder is here, I should have activity year round.  :feedbirds:

Now I have to work on getting soil in and some plants around the balcony. I plan on growing some lettuces, tomatoes, maybe some peppers and herbs. Too bad all my pots are up in Lindsay.  :evil:
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: steffie on June 03, 2008, 08:34:01 AM
Quote
Now that they know the feeder is here, I should have activity year round.
I have one too.  I like the sounds of chirping birds, too.  I like to watch them flutter in, chirp the "Food's here!" signal to their sisters/brothers, fly away, and return.

I.  DO.  NOT.  LIKE.   Pigeons.  I have tried to love them, but they are too big for my feeder (filled with small seed, no sunflower seeds, for the little ones), are dirty (crap all over my porch), and while the cooing is soothing for the first 2 minutes, beyond that the sound just grates, because it equals large pigeon poo on my carefully cultivated porch, and while the pigeons are flapping about trying to pry the seed from the feeder, they scare away the intended recipients!

I have now taken my feeder down.  I will try it in the backyard.  I think pigeons don't like well treed back yards.  I hope.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Berlynn on June 06, 2008, 10:58:58 PM
I've been loving the birds, too!  And, having just returned from a road trip that took me into rural SK I have seen many of the wondrous ones in the trees, at the sides of roads and on the waters.  Best was the unidentified one that called some kind of eeyonaq from my friend's dugout.  It called well into the night, past midnight, anyway.

Steffie, to get the pigeons to disappear, simply set out an owl statue.  They won't come anywhere near and owl.  They were hanging around outside my office window until I put a clay owl my son made 5 years ago on the windowsill.  They haven't been back since!
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: steffie on June 07, 2008, 01:52:35 PM
There's a small yellow finch (?) who has made her nest in my lilac bush.  When I cut away some blooms, in the space left behind I saw her little nest.  She files away when I come around, but otherwise sits there, presumably on some eggs.  I wish she wouldn't be afraid of me, and I hope human acrtivity won't cause her to abandon her nest.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Berlynn on June 07, 2008, 02:27:49 PM
Is it an American goldfinch (http://www.birds.cornell.edu/AllAboutBirds/BirdGuide/American_Goldfinch.html)?  Or a warbler (http://www.birds.cornell.edu/AllAboutBirds/BirdGuide/Yellow_Warbler.html)?  Or, some other *clears throat* yellow bird, up high in the lilac tree... :whis:

I love that Cornell Univ website (http://www.birds.cornell.edu/) and have spent an abundance of time at it since I discovered it this spring.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Gigi on June 07, 2008, 02:39:06 PM
Quote from: Berlynn
Or, some other *clears throat* yellow bird, up high in the lilac tree... :whis:
HEY!  That's a banana tree!

Grosbeaks are yellow, too, but not likely mistaken for a finch.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Berlynn on June 07, 2008, 02:43:20 PM
Heh-heh.  But Steffie's talkin' 'bout her lilac tree...

And yes, I forgot about the grosbeak (http://www.birds.cornell.edu/BOW/evgr/).
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: steffie on June 08, 2008, 09:17:19 AM
She appears to be bright yellow, and if any resemblence to the links above, it would be to the warbler, but not quite.  

So: outdoor gardens.  I soaked some peat-pucks that quickly plumped into peat-pots (seed pots, I guess they are called) and planted sunflowers and more blue morning glories.  

I really want to see if I can sustain the suns in a pot on my sunny front porch.  They would need a climby-thingy, yes?
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on June 08, 2008, 09:29:00 AM
I don't think that sunflowers climb, although morning glories do. Sunflowers might need staking, or tying to a wall.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Debra on June 08, 2008, 09:49:01 AM
If the sunflowers are nice tall ones the morning glories will climb right up them, if close enough they will wrap around them anyway. But glories don't need anything fancy a few bits of string attached the the pot and up high will do.

The one painful thing about sunflowers is just when they are at their most proud a squirrel is likely to come along and like the queen of hearts order "Off with it's head!"  :annoyed:
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Berlynn on June 08, 2008, 04:33:26 PM
The only thing sunflowers might need is a stake if the winds are strong enough to blow them around, particularly once the heads get heavy.  And yes, beware of the killer squirrels!  They will take anything edible, I tell you!  En. Ee. Thing!
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: anne cameron on June 08, 2008, 04:42:19 PM
Tie a moth ball so it hangs just below the sunflower head.  If you wrap it in a bit of gauze then fasten the gauze to a shoe lace...squirrels detest the smell of moth balls.  So do deer.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: kuri on June 08, 2008, 10:01:00 PM
Where can you buy moth balls these days? I've never even seen them around, though it might be a good idea, what with all the natural wool I have for knitting. (And for sunflowers.....)
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Debra on June 08, 2008, 10:05:01 PM
I usually see them at dollar stores
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on August 29, 2009, 10:54:31 PM
I've been cooking veggies from my garden the past few weeks, buttered garlicky cabbage tonight with my roasted salmon in a creamy butter sauce. I love my garden, but it didn't produce as much this year. Stuff that did well included lettuce, beets, cabbage, radish, swiss chard, and spinach. Suff that hasn'y done well includes carrots and all my herbs except cilantro. No onion, basil or mint.  The flower gardens were spectacular.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on August 30, 2009, 07:29:28 AM
My only crop this year, Boom Boom, has been a pot of five basil plants that I brought with me when I moved. They've done very well in the pot (a decorative little clay oblong) for about four months. I thought of transferring them outside, where I certainly have room, but I can't find my trowel and it's getting a little late in the season. I should be able to keep the pot going on my kitchen window for quite a bit longer than I could in the garden -- basil is pretty delicate.

I have to find that trowel, though, because I have a pretty perennial that won't make it through the winter indoors in its pot. It's thriving, but it's a sort of bonsai version of itself at the moment, and it should have a chance to take root.

Did you plant chives, Boom Boom? Chives are tough, boy, tough tough tough tough, and they're perennial, also very pretty flowering plants, and chive flowers are crunchy delish in salads.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: steffie on August 30, 2009, 08:41:52 AM
Chive flowers, huh?  I've always love snipped chives in scrambled eggs.  MMM.   What about parsley?  A moving friend gave me an overgrown herb-pot, and the only thing not dead is the parsley, and it's flourishing.  Will it stand the winter in my flower-bed out front?  I hoped to turn one end into an herb garden.  Already has chives.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on August 30, 2009, 08:43:14 AM
Yes, skd, I planted lots of chives - and they're flowering beautifully, so I've let them be. They'll actually at the edge of my property overlooking the Gulf along with hundreds of wildflowers, all holding the soil firm so it doesn't fall down the cliff in shoreline erosion, and since they're doing an important job, I feel that's another reason to just let them be. I actually don't use chives in cooking much - but I use a lot of basil. I'm just in a total funk that none of my basil seeds came up this year.  :annoyed:
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on August 30, 2009, 10:01:32 AM
I've seen parsley come back -- no guarantees, but I think it can survive mild winters here. Chives never quit; but basil, alas, has to be planted anew every year. I suppose we should all learn how to save the seeds when some of it bolts, but I cheat and buy little starter plants.  :oops:

Did you put the seeds straight into the ground, Boom Boom? That might be the problem -- they might need a head start indoors in wee peat pots.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on August 30, 2009, 11:42:12 AM
I planted them (basil) directly into the ground in my greenhouse - I thought that would be enough. Next year I'm starting them indooors.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on August 30, 2009, 11:50:52 AM
Yes, I think they need to be coddled in wee peat pots for a while -- basil is very tender, even once it's going.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on August 30, 2009, 09:32:40 PM
Can I keep growing basil in the house year-round, I wonder?  It's my favourite herb. :drool
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on August 30, 2009, 11:23:40 PM
You can BB, but I never bother, I buy so much and dry and then freeze for the winter. I chop while frozen so's not a bother, can be mushy if not. The most important rule, besides lots of light, f the surface of the soil feels dry, you need to water. Another way to tell is to pick up the container and check how heavy it is. Your herbs like their soil to drain fast. You need to have containers with holes in the bottoms, and you need to add a layer of broken roof tiles (slate is ideal) or other small flat stones, or a centimetre or so of perlite or gravel to the bottom of each container as you transplant. It is best to water thoroughly but less often. Water the container until some water comes out of the bottom, but don't over-water. For me it's about drainage, water and sunlight.

eta - altho basil is now easy to pick, I still used some old frozen basil from last year in tonight's green salad, and it was just fine.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on August 30, 2009, 11:39:06 PM
I have to grow my own because the store here just sells dried basil. :(
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on August 30, 2009, 11:44:45 PM
I love rosemary, too, especially with potatoes. :drool  I've never tried growing it, though. :oops:
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on August 30, 2009, 11:46:30 PM
Well then that shouldn't be a problem for you at all. Just make sure the pot(s) has some rocks/gravel 2/3's down in the soil for drainage, they like that. Well Rosemary I buy dried, so not sure how to grow that, but your basil will be fine. I've a tone of rosemary right now. What's funny is I grow dill thruout summer, but always end up buying it and drying out for winter. Sorry I should add, when I dry my own dill, it's not the same as drying storebought dill. Dunno why.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on August 31, 2009, 06:54:44 AM
Rosemary is like a little bush -- well, it is a little bush. In places where it can survive the winter, or maybe in hothouses, it will grow to a size where it can be trimmed cone-like into a mini-Christmas tree -- I was given one of those as a present one year, but of course it dried out very rapidly in our heated houses, no matter how I watered it -- the needles became very brittle, and it stopped growing. So I had a lot of dried rosemary again.

You know where rosemary is wonderful? In the bath!   :bath  You can buy rosemary oils for the bath, or you can just make your own -- the scent is so relaxing and soothing.

I've never been able to get a pot of basil all the way through the winter indoors, even with careful watering. Again, I think that's our central heating -- our houses are just too dry for plants that rely heavily on moisture through their leaves. You can try, see how long you can keep it going, but it will begin to get sad by Christmas, I'm betting.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: lagatta on August 31, 2009, 07:24:09 AM
In the Mediterranean, rosemary can be quite a large bush. It smells wonderful. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosemary (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosemary)

(What am I doing in this frozen waste?)  :(
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: steffie on August 31, 2009, 08:13:46 AM
from the above wiki entry:
Quote
Somehow, the use of rosemary in the garden to repel witches turned into signification that the woman ruled the household in homes and gardens where rosemary grew abundantly. By the 16th century, this practise became a bone of contention; and men were known to rip up rosemary bushes to show that they, not their wives, ruled the roost.
:lol:
Where can I get one of those bushes??
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on August 31, 2009, 09:47:04 AM
Here's what the Veseys website says about both:

Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)  â€¢  Tender Perennial - Zones 8-10.  
Germination is slow. Sow seeds 1/8" deep in flats indoors and plant in garden 2 feet apart after the seedlings are 3" tall. Prefers a sunny location. Cut anytime as needed, being careful not to remove more than 20% of the growth at a time. For drying, cut branches before the plant flowers. Shape plants as desired when harvesting branches. Hang bundles upside down in an airy place. Strip the leaves from the stem when dry.


Basil (Ocimum basilicum) Annual.

Basil must have warm conditions, and prefers moist, rich, well-drained soil with pH of 6. Seedlings are slow-growing and delicate. Sow seed, 1/8" deep, in summer or indoors in late spring. When the seedlings appear, thin the plants to 1 foot apart. Susceptible to frost and cold. Water at mid-day not in the evening; avoid overwatering seedlings to prevent mildew. Harvest leaves every week, pinching terminal buds first to stimulate branching and encourage bushiness. Harvest should be in early autumn before the leaves turn limp and yellow. Cut stalks for drying before the plant comes into flower. Do not hang in bunches, as the leaves will dry too slowly and could mold. Basil is highly subject to heat and drought stress, and will “go to seed” practically overnight. Pinch off any developing seedheads regularly. (doesn't give a growing zone for basil, which is odd)

My growing zone is 3a, which requires very hardy plants.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: lagatta on August 31, 2009, 11:58:17 AM
Rosemary is a perennial, but I doubt there is anywhere except perhaps certain semi-desert valleys in BC where it could overwinter in Canada. Doubt it could survive even on Pelée Island or in the Niagara "banana belt".
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on August 31, 2009, 12:35:38 PM
All I get here is dried basil and rosemary. I'll check the packages to see where they originate from.

Just had a look - no country of origin specified - but both were processed in Canada, the rosemary by Loblaw's, the organic basil I got from IGA in Sept-Iles last week.

What other super herbs and spices do BnR'ers reccomend? I like thyme, mint and cumin  as well.

Has anyone tried Harissa from Africa? I'm thinking of ordersing some over the Internet.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: lagatta on August 31, 2009, 02:07:22 PM
Harissa, from the Maghreb (North Africa) can be bought in any supermarket here, and in the many shops belonging to people from that part of the world in my neighbourhood. I like it immensely, but have toned-down my addiction to that fiery sauce. I used to eat it every day, which was a bit much! If you like harissa, but want to moderate the heat, you can mix it into the juices from cooking meat or a stew.

It is very cheap here.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Mandos on August 31, 2009, 02:27:27 PM
Harissa is spicy?  Someone served it to me in a restaurant and I couldn't tell.  The food was good anyway.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on August 31, 2009, 02:43:52 PM
I didn't see Harissa in Sept-Iles when I was there ten days ago, so the only way I can get it is through the internet.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on August 31, 2009, 03:21:54 PM
Quote from: Mandos
Harissa is spicy? Someone served it to me in a restaurant and I couldn't tell.
arborman gave his recipe on one of the threads.  It can be quite spicy - it depends on much hot peppers are added.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Berlynn on August 31, 2009, 03:54:42 PM
All my herbs but the sage are crap this year!  And I didn't plant the rosemary anywhere near the sage.  Apparently the two hate each other.  I usually have good luck with parsley, but even it did not produce and that really stinks.  I use a lot of parsley.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on September 12, 2009, 08:38:39 PM
I found my trowel! Actually, I found three of them, plus a garden forky-thing. Tomorrow, I dig.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 12, 2009, 08:49:32 PM
My cilantro has done fabulously well, but I have no basil or mint.  :(
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Berlynn on September 12, 2009, 08:55:26 PM
No mint?  That's odd.  Did something eat it?  Usually, it is quite an invasive plant...

Happy to hear trowels have been found.  Dig away, grrl!
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 12, 2009, 08:58:57 PM
Maybe because I didn't start the mint indoors - I planted mint from seeds in my greenhouse. In June. So far, nothing.  :(
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Berlynn on September 12, 2009, 09:43:20 PM
Oh, I've never started it from seed, just collected a chunk from a neighbour at our last house.  Drove by recently and it is happy, happy, happy.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on September 12, 2009, 09:51:49 PM
I could do that. My neighbour has mint growing at her place, and she and I have been exchanging veggies all summer. She brought me ovver a quart of freshly picked blueberries Friday. :drool
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Berlynn on September 12, 2009, 10:12:47 PM
Ha!  Thar ya go!  It's autumn and time for moving these things around.  Good luck, mint and mint-grower!

About the bluebe-- :lalala:  ;)
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on May 14, 2010, 09:20:48 PM
I have no idea why I did it. I finished doing some outdoor work, tried to figure out what I planted in one spot, maybe zinnias, dunno. Did an outdoor planter and then looked across the driveway at neighbours house and saw along their side of house lots of weeds. I went over and dug them out and for some odd reason, I plopped some nastie seeds I carry in my pocket down into the weed holes. Oh well.

I carry nastie seeds and plop them down along the railway tracks and in the alleys all around, so I can be sure of bright colours on my walks with Spencer. I dunno, must be a country thing.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 14, 2010, 09:36:46 PM
Heh. Teh nasties. I agree -- plant 'em everywhere you can. By September, they will begin to spill and spill and spill forward wherever they are, great waves of bright flowers and cute li'l lily pad leaves, so tasty in salads.

I will find some photos I took at least ten years ago of the year the nasties, planted in rows at right angles to one another, along back of house and then down one side of perennial border, took over about a third of our back lawn. It was the most joyous sight -- the cats and Rik would lie down in them as if they were a bed.

Photographs of the front path leading to Monet's famous garden at Giverny show nasturtiums planted along the edges spreading almost all across the path from both sides by high summer. Some flower!
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on May 14, 2010, 11:15:11 PM
Oh yes skdadl, do post the nastie pics in rows and rows. There is no other flower that looks like hard candy colours eh? Love 'em so much. September? no, they will be spilling and almost walking much sooner. I'll let you know first blooms. Did you plant some? Nasties are like triffids.

Monet's House & Gardens (http://www.squidoo.com/claude-monet-giverny#module10741792)

His Nasties (http://giverny-impression.com/gallery/main-alley/nasturtiums.jpg)
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 15, 2010, 06:51:08 AM
I don't have my seeds yet, but I ordered a huge package of the nasties to edge a whole bunch of things. Yes, they'll bloom soon, but it's the vast spread I'm thinking of, which takes until late summer to achieve. Monet's gardens -- what a creation. Someone gave orders during the war that Giverny was not to be occupied, just sealed off and protected. That couldn't have been Hitler; Rommel was resident nearby when he took over in Normandy and he was a decent chap that way, but he wouldn't have been there early in the occupation.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on May 15, 2010, 07:56:45 AM
I've never seen Nasturtiums in gardens here - probably because folks here prefer hardy perennials, and we have a very short growing season. I think I might try growing them next year - as for now, my flower gardens are all spoken for. In addition to daisies, tulips, daffodils, roses, lillies, and various wildflowers, my gardens will consist of Achillea, Milkmaid Butterfly flowers, Hellas Rose Saponarias, Gaillardia, Echinacea, ferns, and Hosta bushes, and a tiny bush planted by my predecessors here (they planted the crimson lillies too, which bloom every summer - they're beautiful).
 
I need more garden space, so I think I'll replace ALL my grass with a huge flower garden from border to border to border. My neighbours probably think I'm cuckoo.:wacko: :pound:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 15, 2010, 08:48:56 AM
Nasties are just about the only annuals I like (except, of course, for the herbs that can't last outside here and veggies and such). They do come up very quickly, Boom Boom, and then you could also get some going in peat pots indoors.

Otherwise I stick with perennials too, but a caution: here, anyway, the plague of the perennial border is, of course, weeds. Every border I've known had something invasive going nutso in it, and it is very difficult to get invasive plants out when you're trying not to disturb your beloved perennials.

I just left a place with a raised front garden that often discouraged me. The former owner had overplanted evergreens in the first place (lovely things, but they grow, y'know), and then the Chinese temple bells had gone berserk by suckers everywhere. I couldn't bear to dig up any of the real bushes and trees, but srsly, that will have to be done at some point if that garden is to be saved.

So by contrast, when I look out at my back lawn now, which is almost nothing but lawn (daffs and tulips in new neat little borders), I gotta tell ya -- that lawn looks great to me for a change. Of course I'm going to start digging bits of it up so that I can leave my own garden imprint, but at the moment, I'm very lawn-positive.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Debra on May 15, 2010, 09:05:16 AM
My mom loved nasturtiums. She used to tell me that her mom would give her and her siblings nasturtium seeds to plant in the holes in dykes nearest the house and in the summer they would be walls of flowers.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: arborman on May 15, 2010, 09:12:27 AM
R is very excited about the house we are going to buy in July, in large part because of the sunny front yard - which will make an excellent garden.  I have  promised to build a greenhouse also, which will be deer-proof (an issue here).
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 15, 2010, 09:16:28 AM
Oh, you found a place, arborman, I am so glad. I hope you've all been bearing up well during the transition.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on May 15, 2010, 09:19:18 AM
I don't have a lot of weeds in my gardens, just grass - and is a bugger to remove.  My lawn (and everyone else's, here) is covered with dandelions all summer. I've given up trying to control them. If it warms up later today, I'll be pulling grass out of my garden.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: arborman on May 15, 2010, 09:26:24 AM
Quote from: skdadl;182424
Oh, you found a place, arborman, I am so glad. I hope you've all been bearing up well during the transition.

Yes, a house in our lovely neighbourhood.  Smallish, but I see that as a good thing (less heating and less CLEANING).  I'll post pictures at some point.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Debra on May 15, 2010, 09:31:09 AM
Less cleaning. I can so relate to that. We look at real estate pron on occasion and some of these big houses look so nice but all I can think of is who is going to clean that up? :)
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on May 15, 2010, 01:45:32 PM
Quote from: Debra;182428
Less cleaning. I can so relate to that. We look at real estate pron on occasion and some of these big houses look so nice but all I can think of is who is going to clean that up? :)

Guilty pleasure of mine as well, it's hard work finding rivers running thru though. Cleaning? Arrgh! Hey, I gots soil, lots of it just delivered (cost me 6 bucks), so I'm outside for next few. Have fun kids, see y'all later.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on May 15, 2010, 05:07:54 PM
I'm delaying my annual spring cleaning until the renovations are done - sometime in June, probably. We're going slow.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 17, 2010, 01:13:43 PM
I was very tempted to respond to Boom Boom in the Tomatoes thread, but this is where we've been talking about nasties, so ... Boom Boom, my bag of nastie seeds has arrived from Veseys. There are a couple of places I can plant them today, but I've got to hit the garden centre and get that spade before I can do all I want with them.

I'm curious to see how the rest of my order arrives, all of it actual plants of one form or another. Maybe I should put a sign on the mailbox telling Canada Post to leave them at the door -- otherwise, I'm going to be doing another of those silly treks to the post office. The couriers don't seem to have those scruples -- they just prop things inside the storm door, which I appreciate.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on May 17, 2010, 06:47:12 PM
I got some topsoil from the store today - expensive at $11 for 50 pounds! But it's high quality stuff, and should last a lifetime. I'm starting to think I don't have enough space in my flower gardens for all the stuff I'm planting, so may have to plant some flowers in my big veggie garden as well as my small greenhouse. I ordered too many flower seeds - not to mention fern roots. Ah well, I can always dig up more grass to make way for flowers. If I had a tiller, I'd probably convert my entire back yard to flowers, bushes, and ferns.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 17, 2010, 06:51:55 PM
Some flowers are helpful to veggies, Boom Boom. Marigolds, eg, are apparently anathema to all the little pests that cut down your first green shoots, so a marigold border around your veggies would be practical as well as pretty. There probably are other flowers that have that effect -- you could try googling.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on May 17, 2010, 09:12:36 PM
I thought I had marigolds, but, guess what - they're lillies!!! :embarassdie:
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 18, 2010, 08:04:35 AM
Well, that's a leap, Boom Boom.  :biggrin1:

Lilies are gorgeous, one of the great glories of the garden, and of course they're perennial, although some are more persistent than others. I don't think they're pest fighters though.

Marigolds are little ruffled orange-yellow-brown puffballs, and they're only annuals, although they're very jolly and useful.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on May 18, 2010, 08:15:22 AM
Yeah, I have a lot to learn. The people I brought the house from called them marigolds. But they come up every year, and indeed are gorgeous. I'm going to plant more lillies here because they do so incredibly well here. I'll have to get a new digital camera as well, my old Nikon gave up the ghost, and I want to post my garden photos online.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 18, 2010, 08:53:59 AM
Look at Vesey's for pics of them all. There are major different categories of lilies -- the huge Orientals, eg, the intensely coloured Asiatics, the trumpets, the dwarf hybrids (good for containers), and so on. I don't see some of my old favourites there -- the old-fashioned tiger lily, eg, which is prolific and has wonderful recurved Turk's caps, is represented there by a newish hybrid that comes in a variety of colours, definitely not trad -- tigers are orange, with lots of black spots if they're lilies.

This (http://www.veseys.com/ca/en/store/flowerseed/marigolda/frenchmarigolda/littlehero/image) is how I think of marigolds, although there are many varieties, a range of colours from yellow to orange to brown, some taller than others. I like the variegated ones best.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on May 18, 2010, 10:31:19 AM
My lillies are tall and the flowers are a dark crimson colour.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on June 03, 2010, 04:46:07 PM
I FINALLY have my garden all planted! I have planted carrots, cucumber, tomatoes, onion, broccoli, watermelon, beets, radishes, lettuce, swiss chard, and oriental vegetables. I'm trying watermelon again, even though I've had no luck with it in the past. I need to expand the garden, though, because I have a lot of seedlings left over. :garden
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on June 03, 2010, 05:13:59 PM
Gi' awa'! You're ahead of me, kiddo. I'm still only halfway through my Veseys box, and I need to make another visit or two to the garden centre.

It's raining pretty steadily here right now, so there's only one thing I can do before nightfall, which is to pack some dwarf lilies in a pot (ha! ultra-exertion, eh?) and set it out to soak up the rain. I have a few aging carrots that I can scatter for the bunnies while I'm out there. The bunnies -- don't ask. I try not to think of them. If I thought of them, I'd have to bring them in, and I think there are actually quite a lot of them.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on June 03, 2010, 07:41:54 PM
Still not very warm here (only 10C today) so I guess everything will be very slow to grow, sadly.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on June 05, 2010, 05:46:38 PM
Guess what is growing on my cherry tree?

CHERRIES!  Like, a gazillion of them. About half of them are already ripe enough to eat. Unfortunately, half of that half are at least twenty feet up, maybe higher, but do they ever look pretty in the sun.

Are they ever good, too. Closer to the ground, there will only be a few of the cherries on top of a cluster that have gone red, but I'm just walkin' around pickin' 'em and eatin' 'em. They're small but bright red, and very tasty. Up high in the tree, there are at least a couple of bird families nesting -- I can't tell what they are, but they scold me on and off when I'm out there. Och, they're welcome to whatever they can get -- what clean digestive systems they must have.

A sun-warmed cherry in June, with scads more promising. I could start a small business with that tree -- not that I'm going to, but I could.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on June 05, 2010, 07:25:46 PM
Where's that "jealous" smiley?
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on June 05, 2010, 07:39:16 PM
Well, if you find the jealous smiley, Boom Boom, be sure to follow it up with teh tummy-ache smiley ...  *green*  ;)

I ate a lot of barely mature sun-warmed cherries today. It could be an interesting night.  ;)
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on June 05, 2010, 09:40:30 PM
Oh, you poor thing! I hope you don't have a rough night. They had cherries at the store here, but they looked a bit moldy, so I passed.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: pookie on June 06, 2010, 04:41:30 PM
I am so looking forward to everyone's advice when I move to Ottawa and assume responsibility for the front and back gardens in our house.  I am worse than useless at this and, frankly, terrified.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on June 06, 2010, 04:53:43 PM
You could get *free* and *live* advice if you invite the loosely constituted network of Ottawa-based bloggers over for a beer, a potluck or whatever.  Miss Vicky (http://www.offhand.ca/) doesn't live that far away from your new place, if memory serves me right.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on June 06, 2010, 05:55:07 PM
What part of Ottawa? I know the place reasonably well, although I've been gone a while.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: pookie on June 06, 2010, 09:43:36 PM
DBO - that's a good idea!

Boom Boom - I'm going to be in Old Ottawa South - two blocks from the canal.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on June 06, 2010, 09:57:33 PM
Oh, I know that area well, my grandmother lived there, and I stayed at her place quite a bit. Lovely area, great for walking and cycling. I envy you!
 
 
ETA: You're close to the annual flower display near the Canal I guess.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on June 07, 2010, 01:00:40 AM
pookie, I thought that your Ottawa house was in the vicinity of Holland/Civic Hospital area.  Miss Vicky is a proud Hintonburger. No matter.  Everything in central Ottawa is relatively easy and quick (except for peak traffic times) to travel to - car, bus, cycle or foot.
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: pookie on June 07, 2010, 03:15:50 PM
Hmm, DBO you may well be correct. I'm not really familiar with the neighborhoods. The real estate listing did say Old Ottawa South which is why I'm using the term. We're at the corner of Sunnyside just a few streets west of Bank - does that clarify?
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: deBeauxOs on June 07, 2010, 03:30:37 PM
No, it's my mistake - I peeked at some of the other houses you were considering; one of them is near the Civic Hospital.

But as I said, all points in central/old Ottawa are quite accessible from each other; even GDKitty is not that far from your new digs in Ottawa South.  My daughter's m-i-l lives a few blocks from where you'll be; she has a green thumb and could prolly give you pointers for easy maintenance, as well as provide info about the neighbourhood, if you like.

There is an absolutely amazing, to-die-for baker/caterer a couple of blocks south of you, on a residential street (I think it was a corner store in a previous life).  It's called Life of Pie (http://www.lifeofpie.ca/Home_Page.php).
Title: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on June 07, 2010, 06:18:05 PM
Quote from: pookie;183513
We're at the corner of Sunnyside just a few streets west of Bank - does that clarify?

Okay, I know where you are now. I lived there while working at Manpower & Immigration Canada in the 1970s. While Sunnyside itself was rather ordinary, the surrounding district is quite nice, especially the closer you get to the Canal.
 
ps: My bosses at M&I were Brice Mackasey, Otto Lang, and, finally,  Robert Andras - a motley crew if ever there was.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on August 30, 2010, 07:01:57 PM
I haven't been using enough of my basil -- it's starting to go to seed. I plant six or seven plants so that I'll have enough to do a huge batch of pesto by the end, but you gotta keep up with the wee plants in the meantime, and I haven't, so I've just had to top a bunch of them off. Nice work, mind you, and I smell really good at the moment. I even washed my hands, and yet I smell like basil.

A bunch of crows were shouting at me while I was out there. I'm not sure why they're mad at me -- not enough crow food? What would crow food be?
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: k'in on August 30, 2010, 09:23:50 PM
I planted a globe basil this year for the first time.  It's thriving.  I'm hoping (wondering?)---will it will be less temperature sensitive than the Genovese basil that's already looking a bit weary?

Crows---have witnessed once a few, not quite a proper murder, playing "soccer" with a plump garbage bag.

What does one do with a bumper crop of jalapeño peppers?  The lone plant is loaded up with at least a couple dozen.  The backyard varmints are way too smart.  No attempts to sample. 
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: lagatta on August 30, 2010, 09:37:24 PM
What are globe basil - the Greek variety with the tiny leaves?

Basil is about the first herb to go.

Hang the Jalapeños up to dry on a thread, or process them some other way. Don't worry about eating them now.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: brebis noire on August 30, 2010, 09:48:10 PM
I'll trade you some mega amounts of squash for your basil.  :o  I spent too much of a Saturday cutting them up and preparing them for cooking and freezing. Problem is, nobody really likes squash around here except for me, so I have to sneak it into everything. Soup, sauces, stews, etc. How can you object to squash? It barely tastes like anything.
I don't have any basil...
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: lagatta on August 30, 2010, 10:01:12 PM
Squash is one of the Three Sisters, the staples among agricultural peoples hereabouts. Remember that the seeds are very nutritious, though some are too small to bother with.

Basil goes very fast. You can chop it up fine and freeze it with some olive oil.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: k'in on August 30, 2010, 10:05:23 PM
lagatta-yes-tiny leaves, looks like this:

(http://growingc.com/Images/Photos/Herbs/Large/GlobeBasil.jpg)


Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on August 30, 2010, 10:21:33 PM
Oy! k'in! That looks wonderful! I've never seen a basil plant look that healthy.

It's a shame that basil is so tender here. I try to keep some going indoors during the fall; I've got a cute li'l oblong pot going right now in the kitchen, and its virtue is that it perfumes the whole kitchen whenever I just give it a tweak. But it won't make it to Christmas; I just know it won't. It's already getting leggy, and there's no effective way to prune it back. Basil just cannot cope with Canada, y'know?

The good thing about it, brebis noire, is that the perfume is so intense that the dried stuff is perfectly wonderful through the winter. Commercial dried basil is still most tasty/smelly imho.

I have this weird 1950s kitchen in severe need of renovation, but it has one feature I really like, a tall but very shallow cupboard with many shelves, which I took to be a spice cupboard and which is where all my spices and herbs and some big jars of staples, like rice and sugar, now are. All those things are in tightly sealed glass jars, and yet when you open the door to that cupboard, you are floored by the wonderful smell.

Nothing wrong with dried herbs. I have sage growing in the garden, but I need my sage in the kitchen too.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on November 02, 2010, 04:20:11 PM
In spite of the slaughter of teh nasties and many other plants last night (our first frost), the parsley and the chives are still perking away. (I have a mouthful of parsley and chives at the moment -- Debra's chives.)

I think I'll leave the sprouting parsley to see whether some of it might reseed -- sometimes it does that.

Chives are supposed to be perennial here, but I planted mine too late for them to flower. Can anyone tell me whether that means they will or won't come back next year? They're very tasty right now. Omelettes, here I come!
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Debra on November 02, 2010, 04:24:02 PM
They should be ok since they grow from the bulb. Some people never let them come to flower so as to maintain the taste in the leaves.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on November 02, 2010, 04:46:00 PM
The flowers are actually very tasty in salads too, crunchy crunchy. Chives are a plant that just keeps on giving. :)
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on April 08, 2011, 12:30:00 PM
I'm getting antsy for some colour. And the redwing blackbirds are back, sending shivers up my spine. So I took a look at the long range forecast (http://www.theweathernetwork.com/weather/caon0289) and saw nothing below zero at all, at all. Think I can get away with icicle pansies?

Wow eh, 19 and 20 and thunderboomers on wknd. wOOt!!
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on April 08, 2011, 01:14:46 PM
Do you think we can start doing our guerrilla nasturtium planting? It looks as though we're past freezing overnight, eh? Go scuff a few rows in your nearest alley. ;)
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on April 09, 2011, 09:58:06 AM
 :)) A non-profit, non-organized group of renegade gardeners with chapters in Hammertown and Oshawa are going to plant Nastie seeds all over public spaces in a bid to induce laughter filled blurry hungover passerbys; they ask passerbys to please dead head the flowers to encourage secondary blooms. Because nasties are actually  fond of less-than-great-quality soil you will see them in unexpected places, such as alleyways, rubbish piles, even sand dunes. They can grow horizontally so mind your step. They are of the Morning Flory family.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on April 09, 2011, 10:27:15 AM
Gosh, I've never dead-headed the nasties just for that purpose, although I have picked flowers and leaves both as decorations for, eg, a poached salmon, or for salads -- the leaves are superb salad greens, very crunchy and peppery.

I love that they grow as creepers, horizontally. The walkway to Monet's house at Giverny is lined on both sides with gazillions of nasties, which spread towards each other across the walk by high summer, so that you're looking at a carpet of amazing colour. Would love to work up to that.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on April 09, 2011, 10:40:13 AM
I don't deadhead either skdadl. I just watch them grow hands and do it themselves.
Indeed in the future I would love to find the spot to do what Monet did. Of course one can just start the opposite rows and then build a walkway in between with a pergola overhead and train hanging wisteria (http://www.flickr.com/photos/leerentz/4600161104/)  to climb the pergola. What an amazing space that would create, gosh I love to crayola garden dream. A neighbour across the street has an old old wisteria (more like a tree now) and it hangs over her sturdy fence.

Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on April 09, 2011, 11:02:54 AM
You remind me of something I have to say to lawn person this year. There is something -- not quite sure what it is -- that creeps over my fence from the neighbour's place. I like it. I was about to find out what it was last year when I looked out one morning to see that overly conventional lawn person had trimmed the full creep off! Gah! Bare fence where once I had a nice creeper!

People here are very big on trimming things. I am not very big on trimming things. ;)
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on April 09, 2011, 11:11:59 AM
I am not very big on trimming things. ;)

Me either. I'm off to find icicle pansies (well after I read pogge). Have fun kids.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Croghan27 on April 09, 2011, 11:15:48 AM
My garden consists of a flower box on my veranda ..... As it has no earth underneath to protect the plants from the cold coming up I am hesitating to put anything in it until I can be sure there will be no frost.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on April 09, 2011, 02:41:56 PM
Not sure about Ottawa, Croggy. May 1 should be ok. In Toronto we can sort of risk 15 April, although I have seen very nasty sleet storms here in late April. The gardening issue is whether the ground is frozen, and I think it no longer is. Seeding should be safe soon, although little plantlets that are already green and leafy could be beaten down by a late sleet storm.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on April 09, 2011, 03:29:56 PM
Two little parsley heads are making a brave attempt. I will plant more b/c one can never have too much parsley, but it is so much fun to watch a few annuals/not-quite-biennials reseed themselves sometimes, and parsley might do that if you overplant. Occasionally nasties will do that too, although not much. You wanna nastie hedge, you gotta reseed every year.

The parsleys are very cute. They are so wee and curly. They are the little engines that could.

Some crocii in full bloom, others trying. Scillas hidden under bush almost out. Some tulips appear to be ahead of daffs, which is just wrong.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: lagatta on April 09, 2011, 06:51:08 PM
Ottawa and Mtl are a zone colder than TO, but here in central districts we do have some microclimates and hot spots. I don't think I'd even plant in the balcony planters before May Day, and it is really not wise to put  anything in the ground before Victoria Day aka La Fête des Patriotes...
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on April 09, 2011, 08:19:54 PM
and it is really not wise to put  anything in the ground before Victoria Day aka La Fête des Patriotes...
  Victoria Day? May 2-4? Nonsense, you don't have to wait for Victoria Day or even the last frost date for your area. Once the ground has thawed and robins are tweeting after sunset you can plant perennials, trees and shrubs and many annuals including pansies and petunias, and you can go ahead and scatter seeds for hardy annuals. Any annual that reseeds itself is hardy enough to put seeds down before the last frost. You better wait until it's good and warm for impatiens though. I think I've been following that advise since forever, which I learned from grams in altogether different zone than I am in now. Hers was colder.

And if people wonder why some spring bulbs bloom earlier/later in typically same soil conditions, roughly same amount of sun, it's because some of us plant bulbs deeper to keep the critters from snatching.         
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on April 11, 2011, 02:41:42 PM
The crocii and chionodoxas are full out -- it's 22C here today, and that may wear them out too fast.

Somebody is gnawing my tulip leaves, but they're way up, not flowering yet but bigger than the daffs, which bothers me.

Teh cherry tree buds are very close to opening, I think. That was such a surprise to me last year, that I grow cherries! But I do, and they're good, the ones I can reach. Alcoholic birds love me for the ones I leave to ferment high up.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on April 15, 2011, 11:25:51 PM
Dam f'ing squirrels nibbling tops off!  :mad2 I just noticed today tops of lillies laying on the ground.  But it's Time, we can now plant nasties!
And I'm gonna, in the rain. If anyone else does, say so, then we can compare their splendid uppance.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on April 17, 2011, 12:44:26 PM
Well I'm glad I DIDN'T plant the nasties today after all. Isn't this rain/snow/ice pellets/wind exciting?
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on April 17, 2011, 12:56:53 PM
I didn't even notice until someone in TO tweeted. We had a brief bout of snow, but mostly it's just very windy here. Mind you, it's usually pretty windy here.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on April 27, 2011, 02:11:35 PM
So wondered if nasties could be soaked just for a few hours before plopping in or must be at least overnight. Anyways went to get gardening books - GONE  :confused Went to get next reading book I bought 3 weeks ago - GONE. Where r my books? Dunno.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on April 30, 2011, 10:17:02 AM
I found one book. Someone is cutting the grass and omg it is glorious to take in.
Off to the garden centre.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Antonia on April 30, 2011, 05:33:20 PM
Just went to Loblaw's Garden Centre where they're selling ''Ontario Natives'' in compostable pots. $3.99. Trilliums, jack in the Pulpit, wild Cranesbill, Black Cohosh .... Bought a dozen because my front is so shady it might as well be a woodland.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on April 30, 2011, 05:57:57 PM
Oh that sounds wunnerful Antonia. I planted some viola pansies, couldn't care less of the date, I need some colour. And I did a planter for back steps, cutting geraniums, snaps and a gerber, all in the same colour zone.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Antonia on May 01, 2011, 12:31:51 PM
My back, which is half concrete and the rest super shaded with granite flat stones -- the whole thing is like 8 feet wide between tall fences -- is constantly the victim of Mr. PeePee, aka Jericho. I am pleased to report that, although none of the muguets I planted have survived, the bleeding heart looks robust, the climbing hydrangea is a monster, the Solomon's Seal, Astilbe, yellow spikes and hosta are looking good. Not sure about last year's single clematis. I used to fight the wild violets but no more. I am gonna spread them around where Mr. PeePee likes to go and see what happens. I am not spending another cent back there.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 01, 2011, 02:09:03 PM
The wild violets in TO are great, aren't they? I stopped minding them in the lawn, just let them go. I wish I had some here. Not sure they are so common here, but the guy who does my lawn is sort of anal retentive and would probably kill them anyway. :(
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Debra on May 01, 2011, 02:37:42 PM
I love the violets in the grass and garden too. and I love creeping phlox at this time of year.. well not so much this year, but then I don't think there is any flora I don't like.  :p

Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on May 01, 2011, 03:05:12 PM
I'm sweating like a nun in a sex shop. Just planted all of my nasties, dug up every single dandelion weed, planted more nastie seeds in a big planter, and transplanted this big succulent flower (I wish I knew what it was) into a big planter and surrounded with viola pansies. The big succulent is RED, it was a nabe condolence plant, I don't even know what to google to find it. The RED flower is in center, big spiky thing and there are 2 wee new purplish ones coming out at the bottom.

I do all of this early, early because I can't standz the sun on me. Great dirty day, and even tho I used the nail scrubber my nails still feel dirty underneath, I lurves it.

eta - skdadl, what exactly does your anal retentive guy do with your lawn? I don't geddit.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Antonia on May 01, 2011, 04:50:26 PM
I hope you are rinsing and steaming those dandelions!
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: k'in on May 01, 2011, 04:55:18 PM
Large patches of the violets here too on both sides of the yard.  They mostly don't interact with the grass which is too bad as they are pretty much the perfect ground cover---intensely green (and pretty when in bloom), no maintenance (or mowing) required, and don't mind being trampled.

Be there any Asparagus yet?  I keep looking, and not finding.  Yesterday excepted, it continues to be bleak, cold, and rainy.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on May 01, 2011, 05:07:34 PM
I hope you are rinsing and steaming those dandelions!

Ha-Ha A! Grammas dead now, so I can just deposit into the green bin. Dandelion Root 500mg - 60 Capsules only cost 6 bucks now.

K'in I had fresh asparagus last wknd at Easter, surely some must be coming your way by now.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 01, 2011, 07:14:59 PM

eta - skdadl, what exactly does your anal retentive guy do with your lawn? I don't geddit.

Guy knows he's not allowed to do anything poisonous (although I think he's used to doing that to other ppl's lawns). So he keeps coming up with bio-friendly things to do to mine b/c he has a hate-on for anything that isn't grass. Atm, eg, we have a grain-based thing simmering away for a couple of weeks -- that is supposed to stop everything that isn't grass. Don't ask. I take path of least resistance. The birds love it, btw. Every morning, they're all over the lawn -- I figure it's now porridge for them.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on May 12, 2011, 10:06:45 AM
I planted nastie seeds in two places this spring. One is under the box LR window, really shitty soil, dirt really. The other in a big planter full of good soil with boost.

Today 2 nastie seeds are already up in the shitty soil, nothing in the planter.  :p
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 14, 2011, 12:14:10 PM
First time I've done this: yesterday, I got two sets of plugs (starter plants) from Vesey's, some lavender and some old-fashioned pelargoniums (geraniums). They arrive interestingly, in a plastic case of six plugs, each in its own little compartment. They were a bit squished in there, but they look good and should revive quickly.

Going to put the geraniums in a longish planter and let them summer outside; by fall they should be big enough for me to take cuttings and start a few more single pots, so from now on I can has geraniums inside through the winter.

And if it doesn't rain too much this aft, I'll go out and plant my little lavender farm. Don't know whether they'll flower this year, but I want a lavender farm!
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Holly Stick on May 14, 2011, 02:51:36 PM
Ahem. I hope you realize that this is World Naked Gardening Day  :garden
 
http://www.yourhome.ca/homes/outdoorliving/gardeningandlandscaping/article/990615--no-need-to-roll-up-the-sleeves (http://www.yourhome.ca/homes/outdoorliving/gardeningandlandscaping/article/990615--no-need-to-roll-up-the-sleeves)
 
Thanks to leftdog who was almost heart-broken when Blogger delayed him posting about it:
 
http://buckdogpolitics.blogspot.com/2011/05/blogger-was-down-for-days-i-almost.html (http://buckdogpolitics.blogspot.com/2011/05/blogger-was-down-for-days-i-almost.html)
 
 :garden1
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 14, 2011, 03:15:51 PM
I read leftdog's plaint yesterday on Alison's post at Dawg's, so I tweeted the link and credited him. Will go to tweet his own post now.

Gardening naked here might work -- it's very warm, but we have mist that is some of the way towards being fog -- ie, neighbours might rub their eyes just to be sure of what they were seeing. But, um, mainly, I think I'll pass.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on May 14, 2011, 04:12:40 PM
Trust me, my neighbours don't want to see me nekkid in my garden! And I don't wnat to give them heart attacks. :o
 
re: Veseys
 
I'm waiting until I get my truck fixed up to see what it will cost before I make a big order from Veseys this year. Another week or two to wait. But the ground is still too frozen here, although I do have some flowers popping up here and there.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Croghan27 on May 14, 2011, 10:12:42 PM
Decided to do my nudie gardening thang today - so dressed appropriately I opened the door to my veranda.
 
Serious rain, major wind and all sorts of cold out there.
 
Nah - went back inside ..... got cold feet (so to speak)  8)
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 15, 2011, 03:46:39 PM
Is it true that the French for acorn is "gland"?
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on May 15, 2011, 04:58:37 PM
I think it is, as in small desserts, no? Latin glans, meaning "acorn."
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Antonia on May 15, 2011, 05:31:46 PM
I'm so excited!!! I thought that the gilt edge toad lilies (http://www.waysidegardens.com/gardening/PD/48091/) I planted last year were a write off but they're coming back like gangbusters!!

In fact, everything has come back except one (of three)  ligularia and the foxglove Enbridge trampled. Even the two bleeding hearts that I thought Enbridge destroyed as they completely disappeared last July after the dig are back!

I think that, after 18 years of pouring money in the ground, my garden in front is settled. All shade-loving plants -- lilies of the valley, hostas, cohosh, heliobores etc. -- are established. Yippee!

In back, the clematis I planted last year is now a foot high, the climbing hydrangea threatens to choke the dog and the astilbe has exploded.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on May 15, 2011, 05:45:53 PM
That's great A, but 18 years? Holy Shite, what your describing takes 4.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Antonia on May 15, 2011, 05:56:53 PM
Not really.

I started with a lawn and a tiny just-planted tree, south-facing. Hot, sunny, dry. Every year, it kept changing, especially due to the growth of my tree and the just planted trees to either side on the neighbours' front lawns.

So flocks that flourished for years, peonies, daisies, coreopsis, aloe, and other sun-loving plants I tried eventually died off. Also things happened, a hydro dig. The Enbridge catastrophe.

But finally, I have the balance of plantings and shade.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on May 15, 2011, 08:00:40 PM
My flower gardens are overrun with grass. I pulled one mat of grass that covered where my lillies had been coming up, and the lillies came up with it - broken in pieces. I don't know how the heck the grass got into the garden.  :mad2
 
I think I'll plant some flowering bushes where the lillies were.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 15, 2011, 08:22:08 PM
Grass is a constant weed -- won't fill itself in on bare patches where you want it, but it will invade your cultivated patches where you don't want it. Grass is frustratin'.

If by lilies you mean the bulbs, you should be able to replant those, even if they separated themselves -- lilies need separating every few years, so try again?

We're going through a week of rain according to predictions, very warm most of the time, although tomorrow is going to be a cool singularity. The rain is very light, sometimes just fog or mist. I have to brave it to put out the few other plants I've had from Vesey's for a bit -- I may containerize more than I expected to b/c I can work with the containers under a covered deck.

Still don't have my full complement of herbs -- those I'll get locally, but I haven't been up for the trip much b/c it's so dark so much of the time. Silly, really, since it would probably be ideal to hit the garden centres right now -- no one else there.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Antonia on May 15, 2011, 08:51:39 PM
I am loving this weather because everything is so so so green and I am sure the drought will come eventually. Also, the coolness is keeping me from sweating up a swarm lugging this moonbootcast around
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: brebis noire on May 15, 2011, 09:08:43 PM
We had a three-day window of beautiful weather last week that should've had me outside tending the lawn and gardens. But wah! I caught some kind of respiratory flu and I've just barely been hanging in there. And now the weather matches my mood and energies: cool, dank and dark. Unrelenting rain.
I've even started reading Doris Lessing again.  :crying Woe is moi.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Debra on May 15, 2011, 10:24:06 PM
ah brebis that sucks  :hug   take care of yourself  :getwell hopefully you will be back out there soon.  :garden
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on May 16, 2011, 07:05:33 AM
But wah! I caught some kind of respiratory flu and I've just barely been hanging in there.

Hope you're better soon.
 
ps: I've avoided crowds here (winter carnival, etc...) for the simple reason I know I'll get whatever bug happens to be going around. I live alone, and really don't want to be laid up while having to do every single thing (housework, etc...) by myself.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 16, 2011, 09:28:53 AM
Sorry to hear you've been so sick, brebis noire. *hugs* What do you do about the boys when you just can't get up for them? Are they able to run the show now for themselves? And help you?
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Antonia on May 16, 2011, 05:00:21 PM
Brebis Noir said
Quote
I've even started reading Doris Lessing again.

Jeez, I hope you haven't opened your wrists. Feel better!
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Mandos on May 16, 2011, 08:23:45 PM
Re: Lessing. I loved her "Canopus in Argos: Archives" books, particularly The Sirian Experiments.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: brebis noire on May 17, 2011, 01:23:46 PM
Re: Lessing. I loved her "Canopus in Argos: Archives" books, particularly The Sirian Experiments.
I haven't been sick long enough to get back into that series.  :p  There's something lacking in my brain, I don't have the key to decoding SF.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Mandos on May 17, 2011, 02:11:04 PM
It's actually not typical of SF, but SF written with a high degree of literary pretension plus a whole lot of metaphysics that are too inconsistent for typical SF, but it was entertaining for the first three books.  The fourth book (The Making of the Representative from Planet 8) was a little dry and depressing, so naturally it became a Philip Glass opera.  I never made it through much of the fifth book, The Sentimental Agents in the Volyen Empire.

I thought it was a more valiant effort than Atwood's ongoing MaddAddam trilogy, which just has the high literary pretension but a conventional postapocalyptic-SF plotline trodden long ago even in feminist form by Suzette Haden Elgin and many others, although I do like Atwood's style, and the plot improved through the second book. 
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Croghan27 on May 17, 2011, 03:15:42 PM
Back in the day I would avidly consume anything dubbed Science Friction. I even read all of L. Ron Hubbard I could find (did not think he should have bothered putting pen to paper).
 
Lessing was considered mature art rather than SF so I did not know she existed for years - her books were in the mature art part of the library. She was off with Orwell and Huxley - not mere SF.
 
Big disappointment when I did find her she had not the fabulous prose of Bradbury/Theodore Sturgeon, not the boom and bang of Heinlein and the rest. She could not even move my romantic just teen eyes to tears like A.C. Clark could. (see Childhood End).
 
Mostly I remember her because they filmed one of her books just down the street from me.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Mandos on May 17, 2011, 04:26:34 PM
(Woo garden thread SF hijack!)]

I consume large quantities of SF when RL gives me time but am also somehow fairly picky about it.  There's a lot of SF books these days that are at the level of pulp Harlequin romance and mystery potboilers, a real proliferation of it, which is I guess the fate of any genre that achieves success.  And I don't mean e,g, the Star Trek-universe novels, which have a hierarchy of quality that parallels any other genre---some very good Trek SF (career starters for new talent)  and a whole lot of formula pulp. 

I'll read almost anything by C.J Cherryh and L. M. Bujold, but have become a Charles Stross addict as well.  For some reason I never manage to finish a novel by Iain Banks despite his continual critically-acclaimedness...
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Croghan27 on May 17, 2011, 04:35:34 PM
Quote
There's a lot of SF books these days that are at the level of pulp Harlequin
romance and mystery potboilers, a real proliferation of it, which is I guess the
fate of any genre that achieves success.

such was once the fate of detective/mystery stories .... some of them were very good indeed, and some, that frequently got the good press - were drek. (Never could appreciate The Thin Man.)
 
as for now - I have to make a decision on what three flowers to install in my flower box. - and decide if I should get new soil.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Holly Stick on May 17, 2011, 04:57:18 PM
There has always been a lot of pulp SF, which probably contributed to the development of great SF writers. Look at the old SF magazines which published some pretty crappy stuff, but also good stuff.
 
Compost, in other words (seeing where we are at).
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 17, 2011, 06:08:01 PM
Still have not finished the lavender farm. It feels warm out there when you're walking around, but working in the ground leaves you with very stiff fingers. Do have all the germanimums planted, though, four in a planter and two in a cutesy little pot. So much else I have to do, but the soil has to warm up before I can do this bare-handed, which is the best way.

One lonely tulip survives out back after combined onslaught of squirrels and rain. The daffs are giving up the ghost -- they truly are the toughest flowers and the squirrels don't care about them, but I think their time is over for this year. Tulips at the front are ok but never opening these days because we just don't get enough bursts of sun. Probably just as well -- if they open, the next burst of rain will take them down.

Almost all the cherry blossoms are gone with the wind and the rain. Didn't get a photo, again. Och, weel. Soon there will follow ... cherries! Free cherries!
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Holly Stick on May 17, 2011, 06:31:29 PM
Don't you need cherry blossoms to get cherries?
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Mandos on May 17, 2011, 06:46:17 PM
One of the most disappointing experiences once I had moved to DC was discovering that cherries did not actually follow the Cherry Blossom Festival.  It turns out that the cherries in question were only fake decorative cherries.  Pah! Useless!
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 17, 2011, 08:27:02 PM
Don't you need cherry blossoms to get cherries?

Oh, yes, and I had them, looking splendid for about a week. I'm just sorry that the last several days have been dark and drizzly, so that the blossoms finished off by drizzling away instead of flying through sunlight, or something like that.

There will be cherries, lots of them -- last year, too many for me to eat, especially the ones high up. Those are for the birds. ;)
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Croghan27 on May 17, 2011, 08:52:06 PM
One of the most disappointing experiences once I had moved to DC was discovering that cherries did not actually follow the Cherry Blossom Festival.  It turns out that the cherries in question were only fake decorative cherries.  Pah! Useless!

The tulips out now for the tulps festival are certainly real.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Mandos on May 17, 2011, 09:19:23 PM
So were the cherry blossoms.  My error was thinking that cherry blossoms necessarily lead to cherries.  Apparently, they do not.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 17, 2011, 09:29:11 PM
Mine certainly do. Washington is apparently unfortunate that way. It isn't rocket science, as they say.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Mandos on May 17, 2011, 11:38:59 PM
That's because yours aren't Japanese decorative cherries.  The trees here *do* grow "cherries", they are just tiny, hard as rock, and vile-tasting.  "Look, don't eat."  They smell pretty though, but I am still disappointed in them.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Antonia on May 18, 2011, 12:58:34 AM
Somebody may have posted this already but I stumbled across it just know as was poking around looking for info for a plant that I'd forgotten the name of, another one that was wiped out in the Enbridge debacle but it's back. Anyway it's an ...

An excellent guide to plants (http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/plants/plant_finder/)
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: arborman on May 18, 2011, 05:02:16 PM
Last week I planted a few things:

Cherry tree grafted with 5 varieties of edible cherry (whee).

2 varieties of Saskatoon berry (or 'serviceberry as some easterners call it for inexplicable reasons).

1 Koch grapevine - planted next to the raspberries.

1 Fruiting red currant bush.

And 1 flowering red currant bush next to the property line.

The above were all Mothers day gifts from the boys & myself to R (though truth be told the Saskies were a gift to me as she does not know them).

Now we'll see if they grow.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Antonia on May 18, 2011, 06:42:11 PM
Is that why they call you Arborman?
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: lagatta on May 18, 2011, 09:39:36 PM
Antonia, if I recall from babble, our arborfriend was a tree planter in his callow youth. Nice to see he is keeping it up!
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: arborman on May 19, 2011, 01:03:06 AM
Antonia, if I recall from babble, our arborfriend was a tree planter in his callow youth. Nice to see he is keeping it up!

The name came from my ten summers as a treeplanter - it was an email address for my crew to contact when on the road.  Ye gods but that was awhile ago.

Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Antonia on May 19, 2011, 03:33:13 AM
I planted trees on summer in the Laurentians. It was a great summer, most of which I don't remember. 1970.  8)
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: skdadl on May 19, 2011, 06:04:30 AM
As they say, if you can remember it, you weren't there. ;)
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Croghan27 on May 22, 2011, 11:49:02 AM
Fun with stereotypes.
 
For those troubled by the omnipresent dandelion - here is what the Citizen thinks: (http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/royal-wedding/Kelly+Egan+dandelions+make+crazy/4823039/story.html)
 
among other things:
 
Quote
Conservatives, I would venture, want to pull up, imprison or outright kill every
 dandelion ...

Quote
Liberals, as you might expect, are all over the place on this on this

and:
 
Quote
New Democrats, of course, will not harm them, except to gently harvest them for 
eating or fermenting, or for braiding in the hair. It’s a flower-power
thing.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: lagatta on May 22, 2011, 01:14:06 PM
I suppose the Greens and the Bloc are pretty much onside with the NDP, but the Greens say NDPers are more interested in resource-extraction (hey, that dandelion wine!) than in the welfare of the dandelion, and the Bloc is concerned above all with the welfare of the DISTINCT pissenlit québécois...

The Cons will figure out a way of making car fuel from the poor fermented dandelions while ruining the dandelion habitat and the people who consume them (a huge mob of Southern European grannies will rise up in anger) and the Liberals will still claim they are the Natural Dandelion Party. (Someone will point out to them that this spells NDP...).
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Antonia on May 22, 2011, 02:28:17 PM
Oh God, I have turned into my southern European Granny. I am seriously eyeing all the dandelions and it is only my fractured ankle that is keeping me from picking them as I can't walk on uneven ground and, if I bend too far over in my moonboot, I literally roll forward and do a face plant.

Meanwhile, yesterday, we went to Canadian Tire and bought the most awesome galvanized steel fencing, by the panel and the pole. We had to go to three different stores to get all the pieces -- and we still don't have enough -- but I just love this thing! It's a new product and I suspect CT did not expect it to be so hot. The rest of the fence stuff will be available in a couple of weeks.

Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Croghan27 on May 22, 2011, 04:15:23 PM
20 years of living in middle class bliss taught me that dandelions are smarter than I - the best that can be hoped for is to live in some kind of tolerant co-existence.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: kuri on May 24, 2011, 12:34:28 AM
I'm sort of OK with the dandelions - at least they are sort of manageable. One of the main things making me want to switch to a container-only garden is quack grass. Nothing eliminates it. It came up through my eco-friendly, lasagna garden boxes, and when I decided to bring out the big guns I discovered that even Round Up is powerless against it.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on May 26, 2011, 11:40:04 PM
It is just POURING once again. Yet today I got out so many times to admire my pretties and do more weeding. The mozzies are going to be everywhere, just today I noticed the low flying swallows having a mozzie eating fest in the park today. Sadly the lilacs are about to turn brown, but the asparagus is in!
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: lagatta on May 26, 2011, 11:43:40 PM
What are mozzies?
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on May 26, 2011, 11:59:55 PM
 :)) mosquitoes
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on May 27, 2011, 12:04:35 AM
Been working in the garden all week. Sore bones and muscles.  :o
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Herr Magoo on May 30, 2011, 11:56:12 AM
Last year, for the lulz, I planted some seeds from my spice cupboard, and they grew.  I didn't take really good care of them, mind you, and they were in too wee a pot, but they definitely grew.
 
This year I felt lazy, so I planted a spice blend -- Panch phoran (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panch_phoran) -- and already the pot they're in looks like a chia pet.
 
Only problem is I don't know which sprout is which of the five seeds.  But if I get some fenugreek leaf, that'll be good.  Last year my fenugreek actually seeded, so I have my own fresh fenugreek seed, about enough for a small pot of dal.  :)
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on June 13, 2011, 01:36:33 PM
Fun with illusions. Wouldn't it be fun to watch 'high' friends encountering THIS fantastic Stockholm street illusion in your backyard? (http://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/daily-buzz/swedish-artist-erik-johansson-creates-incredible-optical-illusion-193042159.html)
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on June 15, 2011, 01:33:48 PM
Tonights the night for those with Moon Gardens.

NA won't see the lunar eclipse but you can watch livestream here (http://www.livestream.com/swansiliguri)
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on June 25, 2011, 03:29:43 PM
I'm tuckered; weeding, pinching, deadheading, transplanting, re-arranging gnomes and oh yeah hey Skdadl, if your reading, my nasturtiums are all abloom!  :p
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on November 15, 2011, 12:58:43 PM
I've just harvested all my dill, hung to dry now. The nosecones (Echinacea) need thinning out and I've dug a new spot for them. That frost-resistant white daisy perennial outdid itself, very beautiful and worth getting more. They bloom in November and they are all over the house now. It's going to the new spot as well. Well, gonna start digging.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on January 30, 2012, 12:22:13 AM
The USDA has put out a new hardiness planting zone map. You won't see the new map on seed packets this year, not til next year. Thing is the 'new' map is already 7 years old.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/25/planting-zone-map-updated_n_1230893.html (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/25/planting-zone-map-updated_n_1230893.html)


If Canada puts one out, surely they will be more updated than this one. Someone in Toronto reports seeing snowdrops coming up already. Dormancy must be a problem this winter ferrsure. We're at minus 8 right now, but going up to plus 7 on Tuesday, with sun, so we'll see if it gets higher. What a strange winter.  :confused
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: arborman on March 25, 2012, 04:07:10 PM
Our crocuses are coming up and making me happy.  R was out in the garden digging and such over the last few (gorgeous) days. 

Sadly, a big windstorm a couple weeks ago knocked over our aging Eucalyptus tree.  It left a stump and some smaller shoots, which we'll leave for visual interest, but the poor thing was badly rotten at the base.  Now I have to fire up the evilsaw and cut it up, though I've no idea if it is good for firewood (perhaps very fragrant firewood?).

Haven't built the greenhouse yet, I think I'll build a few small boxes with glass tops for the tomatoes, using scrap glass.  R will like that, methinks.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Antonia on March 26, 2012, 05:13:02 PM
My peonies are 8 inches high.  :o
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: lagatta on March 26, 2012, 06:09:28 PM
Antonia, I have seen so many crocuses up and the beginnings of tulip flowers. I hope they won't die tonight as it is predicted to go down to -8 ... just tonight, after it will get warmer again but not as spectacularly hot as it was for a bit. No peonies anywhere yet (except big buds) but of course we are in a colder zone than you. Even the snow crab is two weeks early.

Arborman, very good to hear from you. I'm sorry about your Eucalyptus. Perhaps some craftsperson would love what is useable from that wonderful wood. I remember living in a flat with eucalyptus woodwork. It was so very lovely.

I assume R is your spouse/companion, not one of the little arborpeople... (Sorry, it has been a while).
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on March 26, 2012, 07:43:11 PM
The Daffs and Tulips and Ground Cover are gorgeous everywhere I cycle. I'll be checking mid day as well to see if all is frostbitten. I dug up my hydrangea and my moon fall perennials, which are outside in big pots. Yikes.


P.S. Arborman, perhaps make some wonderful wooden spoons from the Eucalyptus. They would be so pretty. I once carved out a gorgeous maple spoon with a flat edge, rather than round and it is still doing a great job.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Berlynn on March 27, 2012, 01:03:50 AM
AZ or any Torontonian, what are those white blooming trees I'm seeing around Yorkville?
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on March 27, 2012, 01:33:43 AM
AZ or any Torontonian, what are those white blooming trees I'm seeing around Yorkville?


LOL, could be anything Berlynn, maybe white forsythia or dogwood.  petals or soft and fuzzy?
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Berlynn on March 27, 2012, 12:18:46 PM
Well, I haven't touched them but they seem to be soft, like a peony, sort of, but not that big.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: arborman on March 27, 2012, 01:08:33 PM

I assume R is your spouse/companion, not one of the little arborpeople... (Sorry, it has been a while).

R is indeed my spouse, the little people being L and T.  They are becoming steadily less little, however.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: arborman on March 27, 2012, 01:12:21 PM
P.S. Arborman, perhaps make some wonderful wooden spoons from the Eucalyptus. They would be so pretty. I once carved out a gorgeous maple spoon with a flat edge, rather than round and it is still doing a great job.

Well, I'm sorry to say that I cut it into logs and lugged it over to a neighbour's house for them to use as firewood (we have a pellet stove).  The favour economy is a thing of worth.  I suppose I might have made something of them, but to be honest I've got a project list for this year that will keep me very busy.
-treehouse
-staircase
-maple dressers
-greenhouse (maybe not this year)

Those will keep me busy enough, especially the treehouse.  If I have enough scrap and enough chutzpah I might put together a wee chicken coop too, but the town might get sniffy.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on March 27, 2012, 02:56:29 PM
Oooo where will the staircase lead to? Or is that for the treehouse? We had rope steps, ugh, more than a few falls.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: arborman on March 27, 2012, 03:39:51 PM
The staircase will replace the current deathtrap of a staircase down from our deck to the ground (no railing, uneven steps, tiny landing at bottom). 

The treehouse will have a ladder or possibly a net thingy.  Though not technically a treehouse (no tree), it will be an elevated platform with a little house thing in which a bunk bed and a table with a couple chairs will fit.  I'll insulate, but not wire it for fear of a zoning foofaraw - extension cords will work find.  The kids will love it.  If I'm able I'll stick a few kid things onto it, like a slide and a pole.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Berlynn on March 27, 2012, 04:33:01 PM
We had a treehouse built for our kids when they were younger.  It was also not built in a tree, but under the awning of a neighbour's tree so it had the feel of a treehouse.  The kids loved it, particularly when they played pirates!  I never questioned that...  :confused

Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on May 09, 2012, 02:52:14 PM
This wonderful idea would not cost too much if you either built them yourself or hired a friend to do it. I love them.
Pyramid Planters - no more bending to weed or harvest herbs/whatever, pointed north catches sunlight all day.


http://eartheasy.com/triolife-plant-pyramid-3-levels (http://eartheasy.com/triolife-plant-pyramid-3-levels)
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on May 09, 2012, 03:28:44 PM
The only difficulty I see in building a pyramid planter at home is how to support each on top of one another. I'd have to look at one to get an idea. I wouldn't want to plant a plywood box directly on the soil of the one below - that would make the wood rot, eventually.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Antonia on May 09, 2012, 06:01:52 PM
I have been walking the dog in the hood and seeing all these people weeding raking digging mowing trimming edging and I've been thinking YAY! I don't have to do that anymore.

That said, i do wonder how my plants are doing this spring after that dry winter.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on May 09, 2012, 06:19:31 PM
The only difficulty I see in building a pyramid planter at home is how to support each on top of one another. I'd have to look at one to get an idea. I wouldn't want to plant a plywood box directly on the soil of the one below - that would make the wood rot, eventually.


No BB, there is no red cedar box planks under each level. The pyramid offers levels to plant in. The plant roots all grow down together to the bottom (if need be).
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on May 21, 2012, 07:38:46 PM
What a magnificient day and early evening! Lord, but I can't get enuf of it lately. Birds, walking, water everywhere, cafe talks, it's so wonderful. Okay so got home and was checking all my plants on the balcony, as in what they needed. To my HUGE surprise currently there are 7 nasturtiums coming up!! in the Hydrangea I dug up from Hamilton! I can't believe it. It's as if the cosmos says 'you must have them'. They are darling to be there, but how? It's true that the Nasties planted on the Other Side of the back staircase in H often would travel Under the staircase and move to the wee garden with the Rose of Sharon tree and the Hydrangea. But still, this is Odd.  :confused
I hope I get some cherry and lemon yellow out of them. I will baby them with lots of love-talk. Meantime I had to pull some parsley out of a large pot with basil and one geranium in the middle, the one was not balancing correctly, ha! The paper chinese lantern has had lots of sun for its solar to light up, I will see tonight after sunset.


The dam squirrels around here actually Approach You, far too friendly for my liking. The red/yellow blackbirds actually perch on the walkway and don't fly away if you get within 2 feet of them. So that's weird, but I Love to see them so close up. The swans have hidden their babies, the goslings are turning into brats just like their parents. Idiot people feed them bread bits, which just bungs up their bowels and has no nutrition, idiots. But they do it to get that 'picture' on their digital cameras. There is no point in telling peeps that, they couldn't care less. Fireworks for 2 nights and now tonight again. I'm skipping this one, too much.


Nasturtiums!  :popcorn
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Boom Boom on June 22, 2012, 04:32:03 PM
There are folks here with really spectacular gardens - mine is smaller, but I'm happy with it. I have wild flowers, chives, mint, roses, Hosta bushes, and lot of  lillies. The lillies are going to be awesome this year.  I only have a tiny greenhouse, so I just have carrots, cucumber, and cabbage in it.   :garden
 
 
 
 
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Toedancer on July 27, 2012, 03:33:30 PM
Check out these gorgeous macro photographs of the tiniest garden creatures during rain. I'd love the 2nd pic as a poster. It's a reminder of the butterfly effect.


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/gardeningpicturegalleries/9432354/Macro-photographs-of-snails-and-insects-in-the-rain-by-Vadim-Trunov.html?frame=2290145 (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/gardeningpicturegalleries/9432354/Macro-photographs-of-snails-and-insects-in-the-rain-by-Vadim-Trunov.html?frame=2290145)
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: Debra on July 27, 2012, 04:11:57 PM
that second one is gorgeous! I hope you were ok after he dipped you in the water  :p


I can't pick a favorite they are all amazing..
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: lagatta on July 27, 2012, 05:22:13 PM
I am signed up for high-speed internet, but need a friend to come over and set up my little modem - I have no idea how to do that. So alas I still can't see Toe's wee garden creatures. I'll go look at them tomorrow at the library.

We were at the Mtl Botanical Gardens today, for a picnic and then a stroll around a few of the gardens - it is really hard to do all in one shot - we visited the Japanese Garden, the First Nations gardens and the "useful" gardens along one side (monastery, different kinds of edible and otherwise useful plants etc). With my Access Montreal card (for residents) I can visit it free of charge (except for the small fee for the card) so I really must go more often. It is easily accessible from chez moi via bicycle paths; either across on the St-Zotique path and down, or down to the Rachel path (via Boyer or St-Urbain paths) all the way to the gate.

I'll have to find out the opening hour; in the summer I like to cycle to destinations like that really early.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: sparqui on July 28, 2012, 01:47:02 PM
Those insect photos are gorgeous.
Title: Re: Outdoor gardens
Post by: lagatta on September 04, 2012, 08:23:12 AM
A remarkable story - a homeless man cultivating a garden here, under a railway viaduct:

http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/regional/montreal/201209/03/01-4570679-un-sans-abri-cultive-son-potager-sous-un-viaduc.php

Sin Le (who is Vietnamese) has about twenty different kinds of vegetables in his "potager" (vegetable or market garden) under a railway viaduct near the Lachine Canal and Bonaventure autoroute.